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Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

Posted - 10 Sep 2021 :  17:21:53  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
GAMBIA-L Digest 107

Topics covered in this issue include:

1) Gambians shot
by Marie Gillen <marie.gillen@swipnet.se>
2) Re: Registering With The Embassy in DC
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
3) Re: New Memeber
by KTouray@aol.com
4) Re: Government and Gambian Shot
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
5) Re: INTRODUCTION
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
6) The Tragedy among us!
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
7) Re: INTRODUCTION
by SANG1220@aol.com
8) Condolences
by "astrid christensen-tasong" <attatas@hotmail.com>
9) CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
10) Re;Government & Gambian Shot
by Famara Demba <f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net>
11) African Cup of Nations' Results
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
12) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
13) Re:subscribe
by ADEMBA@aol.com
14) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by Ousman Gajigo <gajigoo@wabash.edu>
15) Subscription
by Anna Secka <secka@cse.bridgeport.edu>
16) The Embassy & Other matters
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
17) New Member
by M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
18) New Member
by M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
19) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
20) RE:CITIZEN FM CLOSED
by Basiru Ndow <bn0005@unt.edu>
21) GRHRP for 1998
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
22) Condolence messages
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
23) Re: Excerpt of News Coverage of Loum Brothers. (fwd)
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
24) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by Latir Downes-Thomas <latir@earthlink.net>
25) Leadership Conference
by "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
26) Re: The Embassy & Other matters
by Latir Downes-Thomas <latir@earthlink.net>
27) SV: Neo-Nazi Attacks in Germany
by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
28) Re: Leadership Conference
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
29) Re: ON PA MUSA JALLOW'S REACTION
by "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
30) Re: Gambians shot
by CAMARA BAKEBBA <cb714@greenwich.ac.uk>
31) closure of Citizen FM Station
by "hellam@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
32) Re: INTRODUCTION
by Solomon Sylva <ssylva@emory.edu>
33) Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
by Solomon Sylva <ssylva@emory.edu>
34) African Americans and US Policy Toward Africa (fwd)
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
35) Re: Are US Bombs Falling on Bagdad Once Again? Reply: Part 1
by MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
36) Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
37) Re: African Cup of Nations' Results -Reply
by "William Roberts" <wcroberts@osprey.smcm.edu>
38) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
39) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by BAKSAWA@aol.com
40) Re: African Americans and US Policy Toward Africa (fwd)
by JENGFANNEH@aol.com
41) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by Francis Njie <c3p0@xsite.net>
42) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by JENGFANNEH@aol.com
43) Condolences
by Anna Secka <secka@cse.bridgeport.edu>
44) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
45) Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
by "archibald.graham@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
46) Fwd: Africa: Regional Executives Statement
by momodou@inform-bbs.dk (Momodou Camara)
47) Africa/Economy. Asia, Europe and Africa's CFA Franc. 2 Feb 98
by "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
48) France Revises African Relationship. WashPost. 6 Feb 98
by "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
49) Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
by Solomon Sylva <ssylva@emory.edu>
50) Thousands flee Freetown fighting
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
51) Re: Thousands flee Freetown fighting
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
52) France Revises African Relationship. WashPost. 6 Feb 98
by "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
53) Fighting in Sierra Leone
by Thomas Forster <T.Forster@mang.canterbury.ac.nz>
54) Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
55) Re: Can't we just be honest?
by "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
56) [Fwd: [Fwd: Happy V-Day!]]
by sjennings@gardner-webb.edu (Sharon Jennings)
57) Poor choice of words
by JENGFANNEH@aol.com
58) GRA, Univ. of Washington, Seattle (fwd)
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
59) Re: The Embassy & Other matters
by MJagana@aol.com
60) Wanted urgently: Starker Program
by "archibald.graham@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
61) Re: The Embassy & Other matters
by MJagana@aol.com
62) Re: Wanted urgently: Starker Program
by M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
63) Artillery Shells Pound Sierra Leone
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
64) The first ugly moment of the Olympics
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
65) Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
by "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
66) Unwarranted Mail
by "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
67) Sierra Leone and west Africa
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
68) ON THE ARREST OF BABOUCARR GAYE AND EBRIMA SILLAH OF CITIZEN FM
by "foroyaa@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
69) Re: Sierra Leone and west Africa
by "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
70) Re: Unwarranted Mail
by "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
71) Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
by "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
72) Re: Wanted urgently: Starker Program
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
73) Re: Unwarranted Mail
by Sarian Loum <Sarian.Loum@Corp.Sun.COM>
74) Re: Sierra Leone and west Africa
by mmjeng@image.dk
75) Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
76) Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
77) RE:Neo-Nazi/"WhitePower"
by h.pflueger@gam-line.win.net (H Pflueger)
78) Re: ON THE ARREST OF BABOUCARR GAYE AND EBRIMA SILLAH OF CITIZEN FM
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
79) Re: The Embassy & Other matters
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
80) AFRICAN CUP OF NATIONS
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
81) UNSUBSCRIBE GAMBIA-L
by Olafiaklinikken Olafia <olafia@online.no>
82) MRC
by "Babou Njie" <babounjie@hotmail.com>
83) Re: MRC
by lamin marenah <keita@rocketmail.com>
84) Re: Neo-Nazi/"WhitePower"
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
85) My Commentary On The Closure of FM-Citizen Radio !
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
86) SV: Gambians Shot
by "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
87) SV: The Embassy & Other matters
by "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
88) SV: Are US Bombs Falling on Bagdad Once Again? Reply: Part 1
by "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
89) About Gaye & Sillah
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
90) E.mail address change
by COMPAQ CUSTOMER <seela@oz.net>
91) FWD:Junta leaders flee as ECOMOG takes Freetown
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
92) AFRICAN CUP OF NATIONS
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
93) Re: Sierra Leone and west Africa
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
94) Re: FWD:Junta leaders flee as ECOMOG takes Freetown
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
95) Re:Neo Nazi"white power"
by Famara Demba <f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net>
96) Re: About Gaye & Sillah
by Lamin Camara <radise@accessv.com>
97) [Fwd: http://www.sub-rosa.com/white-power/]
by Bala S Jallow <bala@algonet.se>
98) RE: Unwarranted Mail
by Sailey_Sey <SeyS@husson.edu>
99) New members of the Week
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
100) Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
101) Re: My Commentary On The Closure of FM-Citizen Radio !
by MODOUMASS@aol.com
102) Re: SV: The Embassy & Other matters
by MODOUMASS@aol.com
103) Re:Unwarranted letters
by Famara Demba <f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net>
104) SSHFC - Brusubi Housing Project
by "archibald.graham@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
105) Fwd: Sierra Leone: Civilians deliberately killed as fightingengulfs
by momodou@inform-bbs.dk (Momodou Camara)
106) Re: SSHFC - Brusubi Housing Project
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
107) Citizen FM........Independent Media
by JENGFANNEH@aol.com
108) Re: Unwarranted letters
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
109) Re: Citizen FM........Independent Media
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
110) Re: Citizen FM........Independent Media (fwd)
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
111) Re: SSHFC - Brusubi Housing Project
by Gunjur@aol.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 10:14:04 +0100
From: Marie Gillen <marie.gillen@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Gambians shot
Message-ID: <34DD775C.76BA@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am extending my deppest sympathy to the Loum Family
May their Saules rest in Peace.
Marie Gillen.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 05:48:07 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Registering With The Embassy in DC
Message-ID: <36356ba7.34dd8d6a@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

I hope others will follow your examples:

Important contacts:

The Gambia Embassy
1155 15th Street, # 1000
Washington DC 20006-2076

Tel: (202)785-1399
Fax: (202) 785-1430


The Gambia High Commission
57 Kensington Court
London W8 5DG
Tel: 44-171-937-6316
Fax: 44-171-937-9095

The Gambia Embassy
3F, No. 92 & 94 Hwang Chi Street
Sec. 6, Tien Moo, Taipei, Taiwan
The Republic of China
Tel; 886-2-833-2451/ 2434
Fax: 866-2-833-6303

The Gambia Embassy
PARIS
Tel: 331-4294-8238,/ 0930
Fax: 331-4294-1191

The Gambia Consul General
Geneva, Switzerland
Tel; 4122-312-4347
Fax: 4122-312-4347

The Gambia Consul General
Montrial, Canada
Tel: 514-731-5775, 518-297-4000
Fax: 514-731-4374, 518-297-2634

The Gambia Consul General
Finland
Tel: 45-3391-6224, 3617-5620

More important numbers are in the web page of The Gambia Embassy in Washington
DC: www.gambia.com

Peace

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 12:13:41 EST
From: KTouray@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: New Memeber
Message-ID: <6b276ae8.34dde7c8@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Can you please add Lamin Kanteh to the list. He would follow with the
customary self intro.

Thanks

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 01:55:58 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Government and Gambian Shot
Message-ID: <34DFF9FE.436B@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
> =

> Gambia-l,
> =

> The death of the Loum brothers is indeed another sad moment for all Ga=
mbians,
> particularly the immediate family members and friends. I am deeply sad=
dened by
> it, not only because they were very young, but also I happen to know t=
hem very
> well. We were in DC together and Saul used to be one of our leading go=
al
> scorers, and he was a fun guy. I am extending sympathy to the family a=
nd may
> their Souls Rest in Peace.
> =

> This tragic death and others that befell the Gambian Community in the =
past
> should be a galvanising force that will unit all Gambian
> Associations/Organisations to form an umbrella organisation that could=
take
> care of matters arising from such tragedy or other matters. It is very=

> embarrassing for us to be appealing and asking for contributions any t=
ime some
> one dies or someone is in trouble and needs legal or financial help. T=
he
> Gambia Foundation based in DC, which I co-founded, was geared to perfo=
rm such
> a function. This role of the Foundation could still be facilitated wit=
h the
> full support of the Gambian Community. Even though some things happene=
d and
> there are other splinter organisations, now is the time to address thi=
s issue
> and I hope it will be addressed during the up-coming Leadership Confer=
ence
> being organised by Latjor and co. in the DC Area.
> =

> I was however disappointed by Moe S. Jallow's post on this tragic even=
t. His
> first sentence read:
> =

> "More important, I think The Gambia Government must not remain mute on=
this
> latest act of victimisation of foreigners in America=85=85=85=85=85..I=
do not know what
> the Gambian Embassy's stance is on this tragedy=85=85=85=85=85=85=85"
> =

> the above was unwarranted, why did Moe assume that The Gambia Governme=
nt was
> "mute on this"? The best thing any body could have done was to contact=
the
> Embassy in DC and find out about this or inform them of the tragedy. I=
wonder
> how many of us have the telephone numbers of the Embassy, much more co=
ntacted
> them. It is always wise to contact the Embassy immediate when such thi=
ngs
> happen. I would like for all Gambia-lers to know that the APRC Go
> where they are, and even the President
> is in the picture. The Embassy in DC is involved and presently the Fin=
ancial
> Attach=E9, Mr. Lamin Bojang is in Kansa to liase with the authorities.=
I am
> quite sure some of you were aware of the action the Government took wh=
en the
> British Policed killed Biran Sey in London, and also the case of Labag=
e, who
> was killed 1996 in Tifton, Georgia. This Government is never mute on i=
ssues
> concerning Gambians, especially those in foreign lands. After all this=

> Government is here for all Gambians.
> =

> I would like to advise all Gambians to register with the Embassy or Co=
nsular
> Office within their jurisdictions. This is very important and would be=
nefit us
> all. Less than 10% of Gambians in the US, for instance, registered wit=
h the
> Embassy, and this is bad. An accurate count of Gambians in any foreign=

> country, would assist the Government in dealing with the foreign gover=
nment
> concerned when such matters arise. How many of us have registered with=
the
> nearest Gambian Embassy or Consular Office? I would advice those with =
Gambian
> Passports to read what is written on the last page of their passports =
may be
> this would help. Whether one supports the Government or not, we need t=
o
> register with the Embassy.
> =

> Once again may Allah bless their Souls and guide them to eternal peace=
=2E
> =

> =

> PEACE
> =

> Tombong Saidy
> =


Tombong
Registering at the Gambian Embassy is the FIRST thing I do especially
when I visit Nigeria (each trip). You are right. =

I even go further to ask if there are any Gambians in the areas I visit
here in the USA. For example I will be ib the Wichita ,Kansas arear for
two day from tuesday to thursday, then to wset Palm beach area from the
14 th to the 16th.
If there are any Gambians in the Area please call me at 703 288 1489 and
please give me your tel numbers or simply e mail me before I leave on
Monday .
The next thiing I also do and strongly reccomend is to find out the
closest mosque or Muslim Community center and just drop by to pray and
say hello and kind osf exchange info with the brothers.
Tombong ,I am glad you bring this matter up and and may I also add that
in DC when we had the death of Momodou Jallow you (on behalf of the
Embassy ) gave us a lot of support.
Let's get together for our common interests at least-( for Islam and as
Gambians ) =

-- =

Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 02:03:29 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: INTRODUCTION
Message-ID: <34DFFBC1.6B28@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

adama jombel wrote:
>
> Hello everyone,
> To conform with the list's protocol I introduce myself , I'm Dagmar
> Christensen - no surprise to many of you from The Gambia also. I
> currently live in the Metro DC area with my family.
>
> My Alma Mater is St. Joseph's - class of 1971 .
>
> I'Il stay connected for the cyber-chat.
>
> Many Thanks.
> Dagmar
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
Welcome Dags and Lamin
I am glad you are on the net and am sure it will be refreshing to
occationally go back to the good old days of St Joseph's . Do you know
is Sister Margaret is around???
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 14:16:13 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: The Tragedy among us!
Message-ID: <199802081916.OAA24383@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text


My deepest sympathy to the Loum family. It is indeed heart-breaking to hear about yet another
brutal killing of our own on foreign soil. May their Souls Rest in Peace.

I do recognize that this is not a time for stock taking or pointing fingers at one another,
however, we must try and do a little more than just sending letters of condolences. In the past
12 months alone we learnt of untimely death of atleast 6 young Gambians within the USA
alone. In all cases we flood the list with condolence messages and requests for assistance to
help the families and friends they left behind to return the remains to the Gambia. This is by
no means unimportant as it is part of our culture. However we are living in a different world.
Even in the Gambia, transporting your dead to the countryside is not easy.

As able individuals we must recognize that death (accidental or natural ) must come and that
when it comes the people most affected are our love ones we leave behind. As such we must try
and do whatever it takes to reduce the pain and suffering. One way to do this is provide them
with means to support themselves to take care of us.

Some months ago after another tragic case the
list received some information on ways to get basic insurance coverage in stuations like this at
affordable costs. Another brilliant suggestion came from sister regarding setting up some fund
or organization. These, like many other brilliant ideas got swept under the carpets of
Cyber-bantaba.

I find that attitude really SCARY and VERY SAD indeed.

The bottomline is there is no excuse to see ourselves as community in situations like these. We
must realize that if we want to live for our love ones then we must not allow ourselves to go
without life Isurance.

Malanding Jaiteh



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 15:11:32 EST
From: SANG1220@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: INTRODUCTION
Message-ID: <6f3c87ef.34de117b@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

DAGMA, WELCOME TO THE BANTABA. HOW IS YOUR BROTHER, GEORGE,IS HE IN THE GAMBIA
OR THE U.K. LOOK FORWARD TO READING YOUR POSTINGS.OH ACCEPT MY BELATED
CONDOLENCES ON DEATH YOUR MOM
SHE WAS QUITE A LADY. MAY HER SOUL REST IN PEACE.
GOD BLESS
DADDY SANG

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 12:24:49 PST
From: "astrid christensen-tasong" <attatas@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Condolences
Message-ID: <19980208202449.10345.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

To The Loum Family:

The passing of loved ones is a very difficult time to endure. Please
accept my deepest sympathy on the loss of your loved ones. My prayers
are with you.

May their souls rest in perfect peace.

Astrid Christensen-Tasong

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 17:12:18 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <226e4bc9.34de2dc4@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Gambia-l,

The Department of State for Works, Communication and Information has closed
Citizen FM, one of the five private radio stations in The Gambia. It is closed
for the following reasons:

1. Failure to pay taxes
2. Failure to pay social security deductions for his employees
3. Failure to pay 1997 license fee
4. Failure to register the radio station with the registrar of companies
(Attorney Generals Chamber - Justice Department)
5. For announcing an unconfirmed story notifying the public about a shake-up
in National Intelligence Agency (NIA), a story with national security
implications.

Citizen FM was closed on Friday, following the arrest and detention of Mr.
Baboucar Gaye, the propriety and Ebrima Sillah, News Editor on Thursday,
February 5th, 1998. They were arrested following a news report on their 'News
at 10', claiming that a director at the NIA, Lamin Jobarteh, has been sacked
from the agency in connection with alleged 'counterfeit scandal' amounting to
about D26, 000 (bribery). They are still in detention and may be they will be
released tomorrow after securing a bail.

Mr. Jobarteh has actually been dismissed from the service and the interesting
thing is that he is married to Baboucar Gaye's younger sister.

You will be updated on further development on this case. I will post the full
press release as soon as i lay my hands on it.

PEACE

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 17:15:57 -0500
From: Famara Demba <f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re;Government & Gambian Shot
Message-ID: <B0000135850@merlin.netexp.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Mr. Tonbong Saidy wrote:

"This Government is never mute on issues concerning Gambians, especially
those in foreign lands. After all this Government is here for all Gambians."

Mr. Saidy did you really mean the above statements? Let us hope not because
it will be very insulting otherwise. You sound pretty smart, but certainly
not smart enough to fool everyone on this forum. Your claims are evidently
synthetic and only a dim-wit will believe in them. History is there to
remind us all. A few year ago a much loved young Gambian Diplomat was cold
bloodily burnt to death whilst on official trail in the heart of his
motherland and the perpetrator(s) are still at large. Did this young man
receive any justice? Certainly not and until justice is done, this
Government will never be forgive or trusted. The authorities have been
taking countless excuses since day one of that vicious crime because they
simply do not want to uncover the truth. Are they in fact, responsible of
this crime? Well that's where the question remain and that's why many of us
will never trust them because they fail to clear the doubts which circle
them. I do hope and pray that one day the family of the deceased will at
least get day since there is no condition permanent. My firm belief is that
"where there's will there's a way." If this Government is truly for us all,
then let justice prevail for every single person.

May the deceases souls rest in peace of perfection.

Famara Demba
Columbus, Ohio.


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 17:19:53 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: African Cup of Nations' Results
Message-ID: <dc7d46cd.34de2f8b@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

I will try to be providing a daily report on the results of the Africa Cup of
Nations currently taking place in Burkina Faso. The Tournament started on
Saturday, February 7th and results so far are:

Cameroon Vs Burkina Faso 1 - 0
South Africa Vs Angola 0 - 0
Namibia Vs Cote d'Ivoire 3 - 4
Guinea Vs Algeria 1 - 0

PEACE

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 17:37:48 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <34DE33BC.4E7B@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
>
> Gambia-l,
>
> The Department of State for Works, Communication and Information has closed
> Citizen FM, one of the five private radio stations in The Gambia. It is closed
> for the following reasons:
>
> 1. Failure to pay taxes
> 2. Failure to pay social security deductions for his employees
> 3. Failure to pay 1997 license fee
> 4. Failure to register the radio station with the registrar of companies
> (Attorney Generals Chamber - Justice Department)
> 5. For announcing an unconfirmed story notifying the public about a shake-up
> in National Intelligence Agency (NIA), a story with national security
> implications.
>
> Citizen FM was closed on Friday, following the arrest and detention of Mr.
> Baboucar Gaye, the propriety and Ebrima Sillah, News Editor on Thursday,
> February 5th, 1998. They were arrested following a news report on their 'News
> at 10', claiming that a director at the NIA, Lamin Jobarteh, has been sacked
> from the agency in connection with alleged 'counterfeit scandal' amounting to
> about D26, 000 (bribery). They are still in detention and may be they will be
> released tomorrow after securing a bail.
>
> Mr. Jobarteh has actually been dismissed from the service and the interesting
> thing is that he is married to Baboucar Gaye's younger sister.
>
> You will be updated on further development on this case. I will post the full
> press release as soon as i lay my hands on it.
>
> PEACE
>
> Tombong Saidy


Tombong:

"Enquiring minds want to know:"
(1) why Mr. Jobarteh was fired
(2) why the government waited until the NIA story to shut down the
radio station if it has not been in compliance with tax laws for
quite a while
(3) why the government took such drastic measures (arresting Mr. Gaye
and his News Editor) and shutting the radio station.

I believe the action is a significant setback for press freedom and free
expression in The Gambia. If nothing else, the arrests will have a
further chilling effect on the independent media. Recall the excerpt I
sent to the list from the US State Department which stated that the
official media is largely a propaganda tool of the government? If
that's the case, this new development would worsen the situation.

Salaam!
Amadou SJ

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 17:51:47 EST
From: ADEMBA@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:subscribe
Message-ID: <4b4c5042.34de3705@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

List Managers,
Can please subscribe this address to the list.
WANGOFRESH@HOTMAIL.COM

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 18:17:25 -0500 (EST)
From: Ousman Gajigo <gajigoo@wabash.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <CAE45325F0@scholar.wabash.edu>
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT


> The Department of State for Works, Communication and Information has closed
> Citizen FM, one of the five private radio stations in The Gambia. It is closed
> for the following reasons:
>
> 1. Failure to pay taxes
> 2. Failure to pay social security deductions for his employees
> 3. Failure to pay 1997 license fee
> 4. Failure to register the radio station with the registrar of companies
> (Attorney Generals Chamber - Justice Department)
> 5. For announcing an unconfirmed story notifying the public about a shake-up
> in National Intelligence Agency (NIA), a story with national security
> implications.
>
> Citizen FM was closed on Friday, following the arrest and detention of Mr.
> Baboucar Gaye, the propriety and Ebrima Sillah, News Editor on Thursday,
> February 5th, 1998. They were arrested following a news report on their 'News
> at 10', claiming that a director at the NIA, Lamin Jobarteh, has been sacked
> from the agency in connection with alleged 'counterfeit scandal' amounting to
> about D26, 000 (bribery). They are still in detention and may be they will be
> released tomorrow after securing a bail.
>
> Mr. Jobarteh has actually been dismissed from the service and the interesting
> thing is that he is married to Baboucar Gaye's younger sister.
>
> You will be updated on further development on this case. I will post the full
> press release as soon as i lay my hands on it.
>
> PEACE
>
> Tombong Saidy

I don't buy this. I believe most of the reasons given by
Tombong (#s 1-4) were only investigated (or made up, it's possible!)
only after the radio station reported the news. How could the radio
station be allowed to operate for years without registering with the
Attorney Generals Chamber? How can there be any independent
confirmation of this story "with national security implications"
from the government? The only explanation I can gather from this, is
that the government is trying to censor the new media or using them
as propaganda tool.

Ousman

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 18:32:55 -0800
From: Anna Secka <secka@cse.bridgeport.edu>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Subscription
Message-ID: <34DE6AD7.CFA9326C@cse.bridgeport.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

List Managers,
Could you please subscribe Isatou B. Jallow to the list. Her email
address is isatou@cse.bridgeport.edu.
Thanks.

--
Anna Secka
secka@cse.bridgeport.edu

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 18:39:22 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: The Embassy & Other matters
Message-ID: <6f3d3067.34de422c@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit


Gambia -l,

Thank you Amadou for your contribution and the issues raised from the excerpts
of the US State Department report need to be dealt with objective by us. I
will comment on both since I am the Director of The Gambia Radio and
Television Services (GRTS) and I also have first hand knowledge on the issue
of using false information for the so-called asylum seekers.

I will be the first person to admit that there is some truth to the report on
the matter of GRTS. This report was compiled over a long period of time and it
does not reflect the present situation or the changes made since I took over
in August. Prior to my appointment, there were some bias toward the APRC and
the Government. This was not, however, by design. It was mainly due to self-
censorship and job security. Some of the staff was not quite sure how
Government would react certain to things and as such they would not take any
chances. I would not blame them, for it could be difficult to find a job in
The Gambia. Another factor was that my predecessor, Mr. Ebrima Sagnia, is the
brother of Mr. Sidia Sagnia of the UDP, and whatever he does could be
misinterpreted as a sabotage and as such he was overly careful to the point
that the public suffers by not getting balanced information. As for me, I
think every body knows where I loyalty lies.

One of the main reasons why I was identified to head this important
institution was the make it more of a national radio and television and make
it accessibly to all Gambians and to serve all political views. From my own
judgement (I could be wrong) we are now doing that. We are reporting the views
of the opposition and other views. We covered PDOIS' congress and we also
covered a UDP workshop on Youths. Since I came to GRTS, these were the only
two times that a request for coverage was made by the opposition. Things are
getting better and I will admit we have a long way to go. We will cover
rallies of any party as long as we are given sufficient notice, which is at
least 48 hours. The interesting thing is the neither the radio or the
television has reported on any APRC rally since I took over, and there have
been quite a few.

I find it very disgusting when people use their own self driven interest in
the name of national interest. This has been the case with many so-called
patriotic citizens clamouring for justice and equal rights in The Gambia. I
have known some who have done and written things with the hope that they will
be given an asylum in the US or other Western countries. It is a shame, but it
is happening and I have written evidences, in black and white. Some of you may
remembered that before 1994 Gambians did not need visas to visit the United
Kingdom as long as one is staying for less than 90 days and even when visas
were required, they were issued free of charge. It was also easier to get a
visa to the US as well. This has stopped because of a few selfish individuals.
How many members of the list have applied for asylum under false pretext
(political reasons)? Some claim that they will be imprisoned and other even
claim that they will be executed once they come back to The Gambia.

No matter what we think or which party we belong to, we should always place
the national interest on top of the agenda. Let's remember what the Late
Nkurumah, to paraphrase -'seek ye first the political kingdom and all else
come second'.

PEACE
Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 19:16:51 -0500
From: M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New Member
Message-ID: <34DE4AF2.4D2C3DEC@mindspring.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Would the list managers kindly add Seedy Saidykhan to the list. He will
follow with a brief introduction. His address is:
SeedyTS@juno.com

Thank you.


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 19:19:08 -0500
From: M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New Member
Message-ID: <34DE4B7C.4B74CAAD@mindspring.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Would the list managers kindly add M. Jarjou to the list. A brief
introduction will follow. His email address is:

mjarjou@aol.com

Thank you.

M W Payne


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 21:08:56 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
Cc: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>, ;
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.980208205211.2750K-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


I totally agree with with what Amadou said. I think nothing should be done
to restrict the freedom of expression. At this stage in our history, the
spaces for free inquiry and expression should be increased, not
restricted. If it is suspected that there has been abuse of that freedom, the correct thing to do is to investigate and take the matter to
before the courts. The quality of a government is guaged partly in the way
it relates with people holding different views. High-handed methods should
be a thing of the past that we do should not even want to remember.

Thanks, Tombong, for posting this information to the list. But I,
personally, am not interested in the family connections between the
spouse of Mr Jobarteh and Baboucar Gueye: that is
simply not the issue.

With all best wishes,

Ebrima Sall.

On Sun, 8 Feb 1998, A. Scattred Janneh wrote:

> TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
> >
> > Gambia-l,
> >
> > The Department of State for Works, Communication and Information has closed
> > Citizen FM, one of the five private radio stations in The Gambia. It is closed
> > for the following reasons:
> >
> > 1. Failure to pay taxes
> > 2. Failure to pay social security deductions for his employees
> > 3. Failure to pay 1997 license fee
> > 4. Failure to register the radio station with the registrar of companies
> > (Attorney Generals Chamber - Justice Department)
> > 5. For announcing an unconfirmed story notifying the public about a shake-up
> > in National Intelligence Agency (NIA), a story with national security
> > implications.
> >
> > Citizen FM was closed on Friday, following the arrest and detention of Mr.
> > Baboucar Gaye, the propriety and Ebrima Sillah, News Editor on Thursday,
> > February 5th, 1998. They were arrested following a news report on their 'News
> > at 10', claiming that a director at the NIA, Lamin Jobarteh, has been sacked
> > from the agency in connection with alleged 'counterfeit scandal' amounting to
> > about D26, 000 (bribery). They are still in detention and may be they will be
> > released tomorrow after securing a bail.
> >
> > Mr. Jobarteh has actually been dismissed from the service and the interesting
> > thing is that he is married to Baboucar Gaye's younger sister.
> >
> > You will be updated on further development on this case. I will post the full
> > press release as soon as i lay my hands on it.
> >
> > PEACE
> >
> > Tombong Saidy
>
>
> Tombong:
>
> "Enquiring minds want to know:"
> (1) why Mr. Jobarteh was fired
> (2) why the government waited until the NIA story to shut down the
> radio station if it has not been in compliance with tax laws for
> quite a while
> (3) why the government took such drastic measures (arresting Mr. Gaye
> and his News Editor) and shutting the radio station.
>
> I believe the action is a significant setback for press freedom and free
> expression in The Gambia. If nothing else, the arrests will have a
> further chilling effect on the independent media. Recall the excerpt I
> sent to the list from the US State Department which stated that the
> official media is largely a propaganda tool of the government? If
> that's the case, this new development would worsen the situation.
>
> Salaam!
> Amadou SJ
>


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 20:15:02 -0600 (Central Standard Time)
From: Basiru Ndow <bn0005@unt.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE:CITIZEN FM CLOSED
Message-ID: <SIMEON.9802082002.A@unt-server.jove.acs.unt.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII

It is not surprising to me that CITIZEN FM is closed
after many attempts by the government to cease its operation.
I strongly agree with Ousman that reasons #s 1-4 came as a
loop hole after the news was reported, one would therefore
ask whether reporting such a news will prompt the closure of a
radio station. It is however very clear that due to the
recent popularity of CITIZEN FM and their efforts to monitor
government actions and even air out live debates of the
national assembly prompted the recent tax increased for
private radio stations from 10,000 to 25,000. This is another
setback in Gambian democracy.
Ofcourse the best thing the government should
have done is to appear on national TV and clarify the issue
instead of closing the radio station,since the national radio
and television station which should have been a major source
of information (ie.broadcasting live debates in the national
assembly.) has been transformed as JAMMEH'S TV. This recent
victimization of the press will be added to the list of many
more (ie. The 94 trial of two foroyaa editors , the
deportation Mr Ellicot(observer editor),the trial of the
point editors....)
Finally the government should realize that the Gambia
belongs to all of us, governments come and go,but the Gambia
and the Gambian people will remain..

thanx!!!!!!!

Basiru ndow!!





------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 21:27:05 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: GRHRP for 1998
Message-ID: <34DE6979.284F@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 21:50:06 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Cc: <FWKOOIST@FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU>
Subject: Condolence messages
Message-ID: <199802090352.VAA00102@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi folks,

i'm writing to say that the outpouring of grief about the killing of the
Loum brothers has been overwhelming. i've forwarded your condolence
messages to the e-mail box of Frank Kooistr, Zainabou Loum's husband. i'm
sure he'll print them out and pass them on to Zainab.

i talked to Frank and Zainab an hour or so ago, and told them asked Frank
if it will be O.K. to send out his e-mail address, for those of you who
want to write to him directly. he said it was fine, and so here's the
address:

FWKOOIST@FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU

also, you can reach them by phone at home at: (608) 827-5469. i think the
same phone number was in the African Assoc. of Madison mailing list posting
i forwarded but i guess some might have missed it.

we also had a memorial/fund-raiser gathering here in Madison yesterday
(Sun. Feb. 8) and it went well. if anything, it was reassuring to see such
a diverse crowd united in purpose and sharing a deep sense of loss. if
only we could do for each other in normal times what we do in grief.

finally, Frank told me that plans are to send the bodies back home to The
Gambia this Friday. so you can still send your donations in. given the
extraordinary costs involved, every little bit helps.

i guess that's about all for now. again, thanks so much for everything.

Katim

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 01:44:34 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Excerpt of News Coverage of Loum Brothers. (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.980209013848.9140K-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Hi Folks,

I passed the news of the death of the Loum brothers to an African-American
friend, and here is her reaction. She feels that there is a striking
resemblance to other racially motivated crimes. Thought you might be
interested.

Ebrima.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 1998 16:42:49 -0500 (EST)
From: Lisa M Aubrey <aubrey@oak.cats.ohiou.edu>
To: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
Subject: Re: Excerpt of News Coverage of Loum Brothers. (fwd)

Hi Ebou,

How are you? Thanks for sending me the info on the Loum brothers murders.
It is really tragic, and has the signs to me of another race-hate killing.
I don't know how much you know of this country's history of lynching, but
there are definited patterns. This, to me, fits a pattern.

Have you seen Rosewood/Mississipi Burning/Time to Kill? Although those
are movies and are not exact replicatons of history in 100% accuracy, they
tell alot about race-hate crimes--there is also the Medgar Evers story.

Anyway, all my sympathy to the family. It is a terrible shame. I do hope
that some progress will be made in the investigation...


Lisa.


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 02:03:02 -0500
From: Latir Downes-Thomas <latir@earthlink.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <34DEAA26.D16FC6BC@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:

> The Department of State for Works, Communication and Information has closed
> Citizen FM, one of the five private radio stations in The Gambia. It is closed
> for the following reasons:
>
> 1. Failure to pay taxes
> 2. Failure to pay social security deductions for his employees
> 3. Failure to pay 1997 license fee
> 4. Failure to register the radio station with the registrar of companies
> (Attorney Generals Chamber - Justice Department)
> 5. For announcing an unconfirmed story notifying the public about a shake-up
> in National Intelligence Agency (NIA), a story with national security
> implications.
>
> Citizen FM was closed on Friday, following the arrest and detention of Mr.
> Baboucar Gaye, the propriety and Ebrima Sillah, News Editor on Thursday,
> February 5th, 1998. They were arrested following a news report on their 'News
> at 10', claiming that a director at the NIA, Lamin Jobarteh, has been sacked
> from the agency in connection with alleged 'counterfeit scandal' amounting to
> about D26, 000 (bribery). They are still in detention and may be they will be
> released tomorrow after securing a bail.
>
> Mr. Jobarteh has actually been dismissed from the service and the interesting
> thing is that he is married to Baboucar Gaye's younger sister.
>
> You will be updated on further development on this case. I will post the full
> press release as soon as i lay my hands on it.

Thank you Mr. Saidy for sharing this news with us. I also thank you in advance
for posting the full press release when you receive it.

Apart from the interesting questions raised earlier by Amadou SJ, I would like to
know what the "national security implications" were in the "News at 10" story
about Mr. Jobarteh and the NIA. Is the media prohibited from reporting *any* news
about the NIA because it seems as though anything related to the agency could,
within a reasonably broad definition, have a national security implication.

Does the NIA still detain people in this manner based on the authority given to it
in AFPRC decrees (i.e. are they still law) or have new laws been enacted giving
the Agency the mandate to continue this practice?

Also, what is the policy of the Department of State for Works, Communication and
Information on such matters? Will the station be closed until the matter is
brought to justice or has the station been closed permanently?

This news is still fresh and I realize that details are still forthcoming but I
find it troubling nevertheless. Alluding to what Amadou SJ mentioned earlier,
proponents of the current administration would find it rather difficult to defend
allegations of press repression that have been made time and again by
international human rights and free press advocacy organisations when events like
this continue to take place.

As our government pushes further for due international recognition for its
achieved strides in promoting democracy and human rights in The Gambia, one
wonders why such drastic and sudden moves are taken especially in light of the
historic meeting that took place last week in Banjul with Ambassador Richardson
and Gambia's new role on the international scene.

I understand that as a people we must determine our own style of democracy and
perhaps even work on our own definition of human rights but arresting people
because part of a news story was inaccurately reported is contrary to what I
believe most Gambians would accept.

I might be wrong but to the best of my knowledge, Citizen FM was not only one of a
few private radio stations, it had *the only* independent domestic news broadcast
in the country. Its closure now leaves the airwaves, both radio and television,
with only one voice where the news is concerned: The Government!

Gambia has very strict libel laws that could have been used in this case and while
I do not condone tax evasion, I hope the government Department concerned gave Mr.
Gaye and his company time to make payments on any arrears. I believe a stiff fine
and a retraction would have sufficed as a penalty in lieu of depriving the country
of another independent voice.

There are many of us who cannot wait for the day when we can return home with the
required education and experience to contribute what we can to our beloved nation
but when incidents like this happen, many of us, especially those with backgrounds
in the arts and media, have little choice but to pause and ponder: Is it worth it?

Latir Gheran



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 23:32:36 PST
From: "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Leadership Conference
Message-ID: <19980209073238.19879.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Greetings:
I have been receiving tremendous feedback from the entire D.C. community
in response to the call for this conference. While there is much to be
done yet, the response to participate from all sectors of the community
is a positive sign. The Gambia People's Association, The Gambia
Foundation, The Gambia Support Group, Gambia Muslim Organization have
all welcomed this dialogue. I want to also commend Dr. Muhammadou Kah,
Dr. Nyang, Dr. Sukai Prom-Jackson, Dr. Ousu Jah, Mrs. Lizzy Eunson-Ibe,
Miss Adam Ndure, and all the other members of the community for their
encouragement and input. I only make mention of these to spur us all
further towards finding common ground.
The issues to be deliberated on, while far ranging will be tempered with
an emphasis on depoliticizing it. It will not focus on political issues
not because one is afraid of dealing with this, rather it would be
inappropriate when the focus is more on building harmony in the
community and working towards the possibility of establishing D.C. as
the national headquarters for gambians throughout the U.S. I have no
doubt that there will be other fora in which political issues will be
discussed. On second thought, I think I should qualify my statement
about this conference being non-political, after all one could view all
human activity as political. What I do mean is partisan politics will
not be the focus.

In the past year, we in gambia-l have generated and explored many
significant ideas some of which have led to the proposal of projects
some of which have already begun to be initiated. Too often though,
there has not been a structure in place outside of cyberspace to better
coordinate these. For example, the book project proposed and initiated
by Dr. Ebrima Sall needs a centralized location to collect these books
(at least for us in the U.S.) No doubt some of the material that would
be donated would also be useless and as Ancha noted perhaps we would
need to sift through the material to ensure that out-dated and useless
information is not haphazardly dumped in The Gambia in the name of a
noble cause. I remember some of the useless out-dated material that was
dumped at Gambia High from the Ranfurly(?) library in UK (some of my
former sixth form classmates, Alpha & co. may recall) and I would not
want to be a willing participant in such. The shipping costs of these
would also be an added waste. Needless to say, what is relevant or not
requires the coordinated effort of a large pool of expertise in the
various disciplines.

The need to establish viable (i.e. economically self-sustaining)
communities abroad as well as at home has also received extensive
discourse in our bantaba. The challenge to engage gambian professionals
in the various fields related to this issue living abraod needs to be
sharply put in focus. I marvel at the list of gambian professionals
working in institutions such as the World Bank, IMF, Universities, and
so on. I cannot help but wonder if we were able to find a mechanism
through which we would tap into this viatl human resource of The Gambia
to contribute meaningfully to the socio-economic developmental issues
that beset our dear country on the one hand, and also focus on the
empowerment issues facing gambian communities abroad.
There is indeed a large pool of Gambian professionals living and working
abroad. The challenge to develop a network to pool their resources
together for meaningful contribution to The Gambia
(and our communities abroad) would certainly be a positive development.
We do need heavy doses of professionalism in the many diverse activities
we are engaged in.
The educational, scientific and technical attainment of Gambians living
abroad continues to increase. However, we are not returning home in
large numbers upon attaining such. The challenge to create mechanisms to
get this very important segment of diasporan Gambians to contribute
their know-how to the Greater Gambia (communities abroad and The Gambia)
'nation' would certainly go far towards the 'reversal of the
brian-drain' (to borrow my friend in this cause, Dr. Muhammadou Kah's
phrase). Dr. Katim for example had raised an important topic (disguised
as a hypothetical) in the discussion of Information Technology, by say,
training Gambians by other Gambians, Computer Programming Languages and
related classes to attract foreign companies involved in the ever
growing I.T. industry to invest in The Gambia. He sighted Asian
countries like India who are doing extremely well in this regard. I am
fully convinced due to the survey I took a few months ago that we do
have the numbers to initiate several projects of this sort if a few
preconditions are satisfied. The need to further develop ideas
surrounding Science and Technology issues and a vehicle to translate
these into concrete realities must be addressed.
Ethnic strains as impediments towards collective unity has been amply
discussed and will continue to be discussed as rightly it should. In
large Gambian communities abroad, this problem has often lurked its ugly
head. Reaffirming our common bond as Gambians while celebrating our
diversity needs to be further amplified.
It is our hope that the above mentioned issues will be adequately
addressed (understanding though that it is a process) at this Leadership
Conference so that we in D.C. will emerge from it resolved to lead the
way towards impacting our communities and nation in a positive manner.
As you can see, all of these issues have been at one point or other
touched upon in our bantaba. Gambia-l is certainly THE marketplace for
ideas. Translating these into concrete reality remains the challenge for
all of us living, not in cyberspace and mental space, but on terrestrial
earth.
Please contribute your ideas and input towards the success of this
Conference.

LATJOR
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
Gambian Independence Anniversary
Sat. Feb. 21, 1998

> Is there Leadership in The Gambian Community?
> Building a Community of Gambians
> The Challenge to Contribute Meaningfully to the Progress of The
Gambia while Living Abraod.
> Economic Empowerment in our Community
> Towards a Gambian National Federation?
> Reaffirming our Common Bond as Gambians
> Time to Speak about 'The Gambia House'?
> Bridging the Generation Gap
> Education, Science, Technology and Development in The Gambia and
Abroad

DATE: SAT. FEB 21, 1998
PLACE: THE FORUM - BLACKBURN CENTER
(HOWARD UNIVERSITY CAMPUS)
TIME: 2:30 P.M.

Participants: Professionals, Academicians, Community Activists,
Organizations, Entrepreneurs, Youths, Community at large

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 03:42:21 -0500
From: Latir Downes-Thomas <latir@earthlink.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: The Embassy & Other matters
Message-ID: <34DEC16D.A75FC5FF@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:

> I will be the first person to admit that there is some truth to the report on
> the matter of GRTS. This report was compiled over a long period of time and it
> does not reflect the present situation or the changes made since I took over
> in August. Prior to my appointment, there were some bias toward the APRC and
> the Government. This was not, however, by design. It was mainly due to self-
> censorship and job security. Some of the staff was not quite sure how
> Government would react certain to things and as such they would not take any
> chances. I would not blame them, for it could be difficult to find a job in
> The Gambia. Another factor was that my predecessor, Mr. Ebrima Sagnia, is the
> brother of Mr. Sidia Sagnia of the UDP, and whatever he does could be
> misinterpreted as a sabotage and as such he was overly careful to the point
> that the public suffers by not getting balanced information. As for me, I
> think every body knows where I loyalty lies.
>
> One of the main reasons why I was identified to head this important
> institution was the make it more of a national radio and television and make
> it accessibly to all Gambians and to serve all political views. From my own
> judgement (I could be wrong) we are now doing that. We are reporting the views
> of the opposition and other views. We covered PDOIS' congress and we also
> covered a UDP workshop on Youths. Since I came to GRTS, these were the only
> two times that a request for coverage was made by the opposition. Things are
> getting better and I will admit we have a long way to go. We will cover
> rallies of any party as long as we are given sufficient notice, which is at
> least 48 hours. The interesting thing is the neither the radio or the
> television has reported on any APRC rally since I took over, and there have
> been quite a few.

Mr. Saidy,

It truly heartens me to read of the new policies that you have instituted in your
administration of The Gambia Radio and Television Services. Since you speak on
such a personal note allow me to respond in a similar manner.

Do excuse me but I must acknowledge that I was rather bemused in hearing of your
appointment because through several inquiries I could not detect any media
experience in your background but the point you make about the decision to appoint
you and your actions since confirm both your capability and capacity for what I
believe is a demanding and significant post.

I also agree with you on your points about what was then The Gambia TV and the
self censorship that seemed to exist. I honestly take you at your word when you
say that changes are taking place in the quality and balance of your news coverage
as I am not there to gauge for myself. My concern is in the depth and analysis of
the coverage. Does the GRTS news department still simply inform its audience of
events, like the recent dismismal at the National Intelligence Agency and the
change of appointment of the Secretary of the Department of External Affairs that
upon some analysis might reflect negatively on the government, or does it offer
more in-depth coverage that informs or at least sheds light as to why the events
have occurred?

I remember from my own limited experience with The Gambia TV, including its news
coverage, that on quite a few occasions attempts like the ones mentioned above met
some resistance from those in charge. I also remember the efforts I went through
with a partner of mine in trying to produce an independent weekly news and
round-table discussion programme that would have focused on the issues of the day
in an in-depth and analytical manner.

Our efforts in promoting the programme to the station for leased time met with
some apprehension that included a convoluted process of getting it approved by the
Gamtel management and the Secretary-General at the AFPRC Chairman's office. That
apprehension could also be seen with those firms we sought as advertisers for
sponsorship of the programme.

Much of it was based on the fact that though it was designed for balanced
discussion that would have included the editor of the official AFPRC newspaper,
the other outside participants in the programme would have included Baboucarr Gaye
of Citizen FM and The Point and Ebrima Ceesay of The Daily Observer, both of whom
were widely seen as potential detractors or antagonists of the AFPRC agenda.

The project suffered a slow death and never materialised but I mention it only
because I wonder if, under your administration, such a proposed programme would
have met such resistance.

I believe that if programmes like this exist or are allowed to exist the general
public will benefit in many ways because apart from offering depth and analysis on
the issues that arise from the events in the news, other independent media houses,
both print and broadcast, will take the cue from the state run media and not feel
threatened from offering better quality coverage of the news.

Your thoughts on this matter as well as those of others on this list would be
greatly appreciated.

Latir Gheran



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 11:18:03 +0100
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Neo-Nazi Attacks in Germany
Message-ID: <9B236DF9AF96CF11A5C94044F32190311DB3D2@DKDIFS02>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Sorry to say that in my eyes it is "exploded" allready. Not only in
Germany but also in Scandinavia, France, Czeckoslovakia etc. On the =
news
last night I saw the celebrating of one-year-in power for the "Front
national" in a small frensh community. Here it=B4s legal now to
discriminate foreigners. The mayor says that france should take take of
it=B4s own "children", the frensh - who else should do so, and if not =
in
France, where else then ? That is the argumentation for given the jobs
to frenshmen, given a bonus of 5.000 FF per child to frensh parents but
not to foreigners etc. It=B4s all over Europe now. And I=B4m sorry to =
say
that we the middle-class, or the educated who has a secured life, and
who try to discuss this openly, are met with the argument, that we are
saved, and that=B4s why we have the arguments we have. But the =
unemployed,
the people who live on social wellfare they give "a ****" for us right
now. There is a serious problem here. Asbj=F8rn Nordam

> ----------
> Fra: Paul[SMTP:bgibba@interlog.com]
> Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sendt: 7. februar 1998 06:41
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: Neo-Nazi Attacks in Germany
>=20
> Dear List Members,
> Every time I listen to the BBC these days I hear about neo-Nazis
> in
> Germany attacking foreigners. For some reason, these thugs blame
> Germany's
> immigrant community for their unemployment. Blaming foreigners for =
the
> woes
> of a country is deja vue. Such things happen in many countries.
> However,
> when the blaming is accompanied by insults, name-calling,
> house-burning,
> beatings, and even murder, then the whole issue deserves a close
> attention.
> Where will such events lead to? I think it is in the interest of the
> world
> community to put a stop to this racial prejudice before the whole
> thing
> explodes in our face. Let us learn from the past. A repetitive
> history
> will be extremely catastrohic. In this age of globalization, =
residing
> and
> working in a foreign country is not a crime. After all, many foreign
> workers in many countries do jobs that are often scorned by citizens.
> Yet
> they are blamed for taking the jobs away from citizens. Something
> should be
> done.
> Paul Gibba.
>=20

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 13:27:49 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Leadership Conference
Message-ID: <01bd3545$5ec92ce0$LocalHost@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Latjdor,
I think you have said it all and in a very clear manner.So,I am
hoping and praying that something concrete and substantial comes out of this
Conference.

It looks like diasporan Gambians have finally become tired of being
incapable of organising themselves and are now prepared to do something for
themselves and the land of their mothers.God! please,help them.It looks like
they are serious this time.

Lat, Power To All Of You and Keep Up The Good Work Down There!


Regards Bassss!
-----Original Message-----
From: latjor ndow <latjor@hotmail.com>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Monday, February 09, 1998 4:27 PM
Subject: Leadership Conference


>Greetings:
>I have been receiving tremendous feedback from the entire D.C. community
>in response to the call for this conference. While there is much to be
>done yet, the response to participate from all sectors of the community
>is a positive sign. The Gambia People's Association, The Gambia
>Foundation, The Gambia Support Group, Gambia Muslim Organization have
>all welcomed this dialogue. I want to also commend Dr. Muhammadou Kah,
>Dr. Nyang, Dr. Sukai Prom-Jackson, Dr. Ousu Jah, Mrs. Lizzy Eunson-Ibe,
>Miss Adam Ndure, and all the other members of the community for their
>encouragement and input. I only make mention of these to spur us all
>further towards finding common ground.
>The issues to be deliberated on, while far ranging will be tempered with
>an emphasis on depoliticizing it. It will not focus on political issues
>not because one is afraid of dealing with this, rather it would be
>inappropriate when the focus is more on building harmony in the
>community and working towards the possibility of establishing D.C. as
>the national headquarters for gambians throughout the U.S. I have no
>doubt that there will be other fora in which political issues will be
>discussed. On second thought, I think I should qualify my statement
>about this conference being non-political, after all one could view all
>human activity as political. What I do mean is partisan politics will
>not be the focus.
>
>In the past year, we in gambia-l have generated and explored many
>significant ideas some of which have led to the proposal of projects
>some of which have already begun to be initiated. Too often though,
>there has not been a structure in place outside of cyberspace to better
>coordinate these. For example, the book project proposed and initiated
>by Dr. Ebrima Sall needs a centralized location to collect these books
>(at least for us in the U.S.) No doubt some of the material that would
>be donated would also be useless and as Ancha noted perhaps we would
>need to sift through the material to ensure that out-dated and useless
>information is not haphazardly dumped in The Gambia in the name of a
>noble cause. I remember some of the useless out-dated material that was
>dumped at Gambia High from the Ranfurly(?) library in UK (some of my
>former sixth form classmates, Alpha & co. may recall) and I would not
>want to be a willing participant in such. The shipping costs of these
>would also be an added waste. Needless to say, what is relevant or not
>requires the coordinated effort of a large pool of expertise in the
>various disciplines.
>
>The need to establish viable (i.e. economically self-sustaining)
>communities abroad as well as at home has also received extensive
>discourse in our bantaba. The challenge to engage gambian professionals
>in the various fields related to this issue living abraod needs to be
>sharply put in focus. I marvel at the list of gambian professionals
>working in institutions such as the World Bank, IMF, Universities, and
>so on. I cannot help but wonder if we were able to find a mechanism
>through which we would tap into this viatl human resource of The Gambia
>to contribute meaningfully to the socio-economic developmental issues
>that beset our dear country on the one hand, and also focus on the
>empowerment issues facing gambian communities abroad.
>There is indeed a large pool of Gambian professionals living and working
>abroad. The challenge to develop a network to pool their resources
>together for meaningful contribution to The Gambia
>(and our communities abroad) would certainly be a positive development.
>We do need heavy doses of professionalism in the many diverse activities
>we are engaged in.
>The educational, scientific and technical attainment of Gambians living
>abroad continues to increase. However, we are not returning home in
>large numbers upon attaining such. The challenge to create mechanisms to
>get this very important segment of diasporan Gambians to contribute
>their know-how to the Greater Gambia (communities abroad and The Gambia)
>'nation' would certainly go far towards the 'reversal of the
>brian-drain' (to borrow my friend in this cause, Dr. Muhammadou Kah's
>phrase). Dr. Katim for example had raised an important topic (disguised
>as a hypothetical) in the discussion of Information Technology, by say,
>training Gambians by other Gambians, Computer Programming Languages and
>related classes to attract foreign companies involved in the ever
>growing I.T. industry to invest in The Gambia. He sighted Asian
>countries like India who are doing extremely well in this regard. I am
>fully convinced due to the survey I took a few months ago that we do
>have the numbers to initiate several projects of this sort if a few
>preconditions are satisfied. The need to further develop ideas
>surrounding Science and Technology issues and a vehicle to translate
>these into concrete realities must be addressed.
>Ethnic strains as impediments towards collective unity has been amply
>discussed and will continue to be discussed as rightly it should. In
>large Gambian communities abroad, this problem has often lurked its ugly
>head. Reaffirming our common bond as Gambians while celebrating our
>diversity needs to be further amplified.
>It is our hope that the above mentioned issues will be adequately
>addressed (understanding though that it is a process) at this Leadership
>Conference so that we in D.C. will emerge from it resolved to lead the
>way towards impacting our communities and nation in a positive manner.
>As you can see, all of these issues have been at one point or other
>touched upon in our bantaba. Gambia-l is certainly THE marketplace for
>ideas. Translating these into concrete reality remains the challenge for
>all of us living, not in cyberspace and mental space, but on terrestrial
>earth.
>Please contribute your ideas and input towards the success of this
>Conference.
>
>LATJOR
>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
>LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
>Gambian Independence Anniversary
>Sat. Feb. 21, 1998
>
>> Is there Leadership in The Gambian Community?
>> Building a Community of Gambians
>> The Challenge to Contribute Meaningfully to the Progress of The
>Gambia while Living Abraod.
>> Economic Empowerment in our Community
>> Towards a Gambian National Federation?
>> Reaffirming our Common Bond as Gambians
>> Time to Speak about 'The Gambia House'?
>> Bridging the Generation Gap
>> Education, Science, Technology and Development in The Gambia and
>Abroad
>
>DATE: SAT. FEB 21, 1998
>PLACE: THE FORUM - BLACKBURN CENTER
> (HOWARD UNIVERSITY CAMPUS)
>TIME: 2:30 P.M.
>
>Participants: Professionals, Academicians, Community Activists,
>Organizations, Entrepreneurs, Youths, Community at large
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 10:27:32 -0000
From: "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: ON PA MUSA JALLOW'S REACTION
Message-ID: <B0000050682@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Pa Musa Jallow" <pmj@commit.gm>
via Commit


Folks,
In so so many words, Mr Sallah has derived, implied and inferred so many
??? from my few santences (in comparison); so I will only reiterate my
opinion again in as few statements as possible...
some of us remember the good ole days of pwd, guc, etc..in the general do
nothing..now contrary to what Mr Sallah has derived from my statement, I
want to say (in few words) that public corporations were used to create
employment for relatives and party stalwarts, who most did nothing or next
to nothing being mostly unqualified and unskilled...now Public corporations
work in say Singapore where their Performance is higher that some of the
Private sector?? why have they failed here ..for the very reasons I
cited..and our social attitude is partly to blame..Aunts and Uncles expect
their MD-nephew to employ thier cousins etc and resisting this kind of
pressure is harder that going along as most people do (for example) I am
currently employed in one of the Public corporations Mr Sallah cited and I
can assure him that the practice is not changed just maybe less
conspicuous..
on the Road to Hell....I meant that even though most programs or projects
are drawn up with great intentions, the end result may not also be
so..examples of these are the Social Welfare programs in the West,
International Aid etc..which have created a malaise to the extent that the
original intention is suspect..
on taxes, I belive that instead of 40% tax on 1000, a 4% tax on 10,000 will
be better and raise more, I also do not believe that GOvt. knows BEST, when
I make D100.00 I spend 90% of what the State leaves in my hands on my
family in terms of food, clothing and shelter, I believe that I have my
family's interest more at heart than some nameless, faceless and
number-crunching or ideological bureaucrat or say the Secretary of State
for Finance;so I believe that TAXATION should the minimum possible for the
reqquired purpose..say if we need to raise D100 million over 5 years to
build a UNiversity, do that, accomplish the TASk and then stop the TAX; but
to raise perpetually say D20 million a year first for a Univ., and after
that, you don't bother to explain, increase salaries of bureaucrats, buy
more guns and tanks etc...
so Mr Sallah, there are indeed other ways to increase revenues without
increasing TAXES or TAXING the few people who have not only employed
themselves but help development by employing others and maybe even
producing something

My final point is the issue of most concern to this nation (in my humble
opinion) should be what to do with up and coming almost 50% of our
population with little education and next to no skills, and within a
decade, they will be childbearing ( a potential social explosion)...what is
most needed is the creation of opportunities in terms of edcation, training
and jobs and unless we do something soon, all our THEORIZING will not mean
a HILL of BEANS to them..

i can go on forever but I will conclude by saying to Mr Sallah, please do
not try to read my mind just read what I say as I believe I have stated my
points clearly enough and amply enough, and have to go now as I have a lot
of work to catch up with after being down with the FLU for the past 4 days
Peace
ps
You rightfully queried the wisdom and basis of increasing expenditures and
raising income from debt and taxes, an economically unsound practice but
your proposed remedy is where we disagree..and we reserve the right to our
opinions, let us agree to disagree amicably without inferring too much or
divining mentalities etc



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 14:51:31 GMT
From: CAMARA BAKEBBA <cb714@greenwich.ac.uk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambians shot
Message-ID: <5BABAC85C96@gre-wo-stu2.greenwich.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Dear List Members,
I would like to send my condolence to
the Loum family for the recent death of their two beloved sons in
USA. I know all Gambians would share this pain, particularly the
mother and father of the victims. I suggest this would never be out
of our minds, it was a tragedy for all Gambians and we must start
looking at ways to sensitise people knowing the places they should
live in case of similar events in the future. Some places are
seriously dangerous for foreigners, especially if you are a minority
in some communities.

This is quite devasitating and much more worring to see your fellow
country man brutally killed in this manner. I hope their killer or
killers would one day be brought to justice. May I thank all Gambians
for their wonderful comments since this news came out. We the
Gambians in the UK, rejected these killings, and call on the American
authorities to review their policies governing the lives of the
immigrants. All lives are equal to God, either you are black or
white. So fair treatment is therefore needed for all human race.

In the meantime, we should all comfort the family of the
deceases and wish them for a quick recovery. May Almighty Allah rest
their soul in perfect peace. Amean!

Bakebba Camara
UK.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 13:57:19 -0000
From: "hellam@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: closure of Citizen FM Station
Message-ID: <B0000050798@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Hellam Enterprises Ltd." <hellam@commit.gm>
via Commit




NO FREE PRESS


I refer to the recent developments Baboucar Gaye (Proprietor) Citizen FM
Radio and Citizen newspaper versus the government of The Gambia and in
particular the Gambia National Intelligence Agency (NIA).

The problem I believe could have been easily and amicably sorted out
without the
drastic steps that wastaken i.e. closure of Citizen FM, the only
intelligent listening radio station in The Gambia.

Where is our country heading to? Unemployment is high so why add more to
it. For humanity sake please think of the employees whose livelihood
depend on the operation of both these concerns.

Since this issue is so hurtful to the government, why don't the courts
decide on the alleged incorrect news broadcasting and until then, please
bring back our Radio and put the smiles back on our faces.

Merely singing the word democracy is meaningless, practice is what matters.
Peace brothers. Freedom is the property of the people.

Yeah, Mr Gaye is alledged to have neglected payment of certain levies but
would the Citizen FM radio and Citizen newspaper been in this mess if it
was dancing to the tune of the so-called National Intelligence Agency which
in numerous cases ashamedly fail to answer to its name.

Who advices the government on these issues? Someone out there is playing
God Please think twice.

Love Mates

Amina Jagne.





------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 11:51:10 -0500
From: Solomon Sylva <ssylva@emory.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: INTRODUCTION
Message-ID: <34DF33FE.58F1@emory.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello Dagmar

Welcome to the bantaba. I hope you will find it worth-while and
interesting.

How is your family? I just heard from Rolf, via e-mail. He seems to be
doing very well.

Once again welcome and talk to you soon.

Solomon




adama jombel wrote:
>
> Hello everyone,
> To conform with the list's protocol I introduce myself , I'm Dagmar
> Christensen - no surprise to many of you from The Gambia also. I
> currently live in the Metro DC area with my family.
>
> My Alma Mater is St. Joseph's - class of 1971 .
>
> I'Il stay connected for the cyber-chat.
>
> Many Thanks.
> Dagmar
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 13:15:33 -0500
From: Solomon Sylva <ssylva@emory.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
Message-ID: <34DF47C5.1D7@emory.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thanks Tombong,

For being on this side of the world, these up to the minute sports news
updates are seldom to come by, especially on African sport happenings.

I have been panning east to west on our satelite system, to see if I can
find anything from the European satelites in regards to this tornament
in Bokina Faso, but no luck. I have even tried the cable companies, who
I know can arrange to get this event. But their response a question of
interest, marketability, and sponsors. Oh well, so much luck in that!!!

Looking forward to these prompt updates, cause anything would help us
the Sports Fanatics in the US.
Thanks alot.

Peace
King Solomon.
TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
>
> I will try to be providing a daily report on the results of the Africa Cup of
> Nations currently taking place in Burkina Faso. The Tournament started on
> Saturday, February 7th and results so far are:
>
> Cameroon Vs Burkina Faso 1 - 0
> South Africa Vs Angola 0 - 0
> Namibia Vs Cote d'Ivoire 3 - 4
> Guinea Vs Algeria 1 - 0
>
> PEACE
>
> Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 13:52:19 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: i31776@inet.uni2.dk, kabiri.ngeta@yale.edu
Subject: African Americans and US Policy Toward Africa (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.980209134723.27253B-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII




---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 11:00:49 -0500 (EST)

Subject: African Americans and US Policy Toward Africa

Dear Comrades and Colleagues,

What is Brother Jesse doing in Kenya on behalf of the US government and
Clinton Administration? Please support the position of the Boston
Universal Rights Centre. Not only is brother Jesse being used, he is
allowing himself to be used. What have we learned from our history as
Black folks in these United States?

JACKSON BEING USED TO EXPLOIT BLACK RACE SAYS BOSTON UNIVERSAL RIGHTS
CENTRE

The Universal Human Rights Centre in Boston, USA has accused the Clinton
Administration of exploiting the black race by sending his special Envoy
for
Democratisation in Africa, the Rev Jesse Jackson to Africa. The Centre
said
the visit was a cheap attempt to exploit the black race and glorify
tribalism.

The Centre called on all Africans to reject the ploy and demand respect."
as
rational human beings capable of making, moral logical and ethical
decisions
without regard to race, religion, or national origin." The Centre said it
was
angered by the Jackson visit which it described as a move to divert
attention
from domestic woes and scandals.

"The use of the 'colour' of Africa-American politicians and celebrities
to
influence political views in Africa while turning a blind eye to the
plight
of African victims of 'colour' languishing at the door-steps of America
amounts to glorified tribalism, and a cheap exploitation of the black race
for further political agendas," said the Boston Rights Centre in a
statement
sent to various media in Kenya Sunday.


JESSE JACKSON PLEADS FOR RECONCILIATION IN KENYA

U.S. special envoy Jesse Jackson Sunday called on the Kenyan government to
halt tribal conflicts in which about 100 people have been killed and
hundreds
brutally injured since January 11. He said it was debatable who started
the
violence but it is up to President Daniel Moi to stop.

"The government must bring order back and stop the violence," he said
after
touring three Nakuru hospitals to console victims of the ethnic violence.
Kenyan President Daniel Moi should exert his influence immediately to stop
bloodshed and tragedies which have also scared foreign investors away,
noted
Jackson.

"It's healing time (Let) people live... one Kenya, one people!" Jackson
repeatedly appealed to the crowd he addressed in Nakuru. All Kenyans
should
choose reconcilitation rather than retaliation if they are to fight
poverty
and build the country together.

Jackson noted that the country's second multi-party general elections,
despite its flaws and related disturbances," went through basically in a
democratic manner."



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 00:01:11 -0800
From: MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Are US Bombs Falling on Bagdad Once Again? Reply: Part 1
Message-ID: <34E00947.1C64@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Tosh!
Thank you for taking the time despite business pressures to respond to
my post. I shall try to respond to the points you raised. However, your
remarks such as:

> Your logic reasoning here is almost to cooked up for me to really be ab=
le > to answer to here..

and: =


> or whatever god damn color

etc. are not worth my response simply because I have respect not only
for myself and you but for the rest of the members on this list.
Responding in kind would therefore display disrespect on my part.

(NOTE: The sources quoted in this reply have been acknowlwdged but have
not been properly referenced due to the fact that some are internet
downloads which I have made some time ago and do not have their URLs and
others are photocopies from magazines which I also made earlier but
which lack complete reference information.)

To answer the issues you raised. First, you wrote:

> You are actually misinterpreting me, what I am saying is that the gener=
al
> public did not know about the devestating effects from these types of
> weapons.
> Therefore there would not be any public pressure against using these ki=
nd
> of weapons.

I do not agree with you here. Knowledge of the devastating effects of
such weapons led to the creation of laws long before WW2. Article XXIII
Section A of the Convention with Respect to the Laws and Customs of War
on Land, Laws and Customs of War on Land (Hague, II) ratified by the US
Senate on March 14th. 1902 states: "Besides the prohibitions provided by
special Conventions, it is especially prohibited:
a. To employ poison or poisoned arms;" (International Law on the Bombing
of Civilians).
On September 30, 1938, the League of Nations Assembly unanimously passed
a resolution (Protection of Civilian Populations Against Bombing From
the Air in Case of War) which among other things gave the Bureau of the
Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments the job of
coming up with an agreement concerning among other things chemical
weapons. The resolution states: "The Assembly ... II. Also takes the
opportunity to reaffirm that the use of chemical or bacterial methods in
the conduct of war is contrary to international law, as recalled more
particularly in the resolution of the General Commission of the
Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments of July 23rd
1932, and the resolution of the Council of May 14th, 1938."
(International Law on the Bombing of Civilians)

There was of course knowledge of the devastation of weapons of mass
destruction and public knowledge could not have been absent if the
governments discussed and ratified these provisions in their individual
countries.

Second, your wrote:

> Based on this I would rather say that the reason why Japan was bombed =

> and not Europe was that by the time the bombs where dropped =

> the european "enemy" countries had surrendered and only Japan (Asia) wa=
s
> left as the final war-frontier. =


And

> Your strong ideas of how the war stood really baffles me..
> It might be "basically evident" for you today, but how can you be so su=
re
> about how they viewed it 50 years ago?
> =



Here too, I cannot but disagree. According to Mick Hume, "the first
American discussion about possible targets for an atomic attack took
place in May 1943, at a meeting of the high-powered Military Policy
Committee. At that time, a year before the D-Day invasion and two years
before VE-Day, Hitler=B4s Germany was still very much a player in the war=
=2E
Yet the committee=B4s automatic assumption was that Japan was the target.=

General Grove=B4s summary of the meeting records how =B4[t]he point of us=
e
of the first bomb was discussed and the general view appeared to be that
its best point of use would be on a Japanese fleet concentration in the
Harbour of Truk. General Styer suggested Tokyo...=B4." (Hume, Mick (1995)=

"Hiroshima: the White Man=B4s Bomb" Living Marxism issue 81, July/August)=

The decision to bomb Japan was therefore made when Germany was as much a
force in the war as Japan was. Hume further points out British prime
minister Winston Churchill and US president Roosevelt, at a meeting in
September 1944, affirmed the targeting of Japan and there was no mention
in the official summary of the meeting of any possible use against
Germany.
I further put it to you that Japan had offered to surrender before the
atomic bombs were dropped. According to Dr. Leo Szilard, the
Hungarian-born physicist who helped to convince Roosevelt to launch the
atomic bomb project, "all I knew at that time was that we had won the
war, that Japan had not the ghost of a chance of winning it and that she
must know this." He further said "my point is that violence would not
have been necessary if we had been willing to negotiate. After all,
Japan was suing for peace." (Interview with Dr. Leo Szilard, "President
Truman Did Not Understand", US News and World Report, August 15, 1960,
pp. 68-71) In an Asia Week (August 4, 1995) article, it was stated:
"weeks before the Aug. 6 attack, Tokyo had already offered to talk
peace, but the Allies, keen to immediately dismantle the Japanese war
machine, would accept nothing less than an unconditional
surrender....Since defenseless civilians had been, after much
soul-searching, deemed to be morally acceptable targets, how they were
eventually dispatched - by nitro, napalm or nuclear fission - seemed a
technical point." Dr. Leo Szilard believes that even though Japan would
not have have unconditionally surrendered, if the US had offered Japan
the peace treaty it was offered after the bombs, a negotiated peace
could have been achieved.
According to a report by the American government=B4s Strategic Bombing
Survey, Japan was on the verge of surrender. The report states: "based
on a detailed investigation of all the facts and supported by the
testimony of surviving Japanese leaders involved, it is the Survey=B4s
opinion that certainly prior to 31 December 1945, and in all probability
prior to 1 November 1945, Japan would have surrendered even if the
atomic bombs had not been dropped, even if Russia had not entered the
war, and even if no invasion had been planned or contemplated." (Living
Marxism issue 81, July/August 1995)
According to Gar Alperovitz, US president Truman=B4s recently discovered=

diary `leaves no doubt that Truman knew the war would end "a year sooner
now" and without an invasion.=B4 (Nation, 10May 1993)
To further put it you that the atomic bombing of Japan was
notnecessary, a TIME Magazine (August 20, 1945) article gives a
description of the near collapse of the Japanese army. It lists among
others that:
a Japanese army of 900, 000 had been reduced by continued withdrawals
south of the Great Wall in China, 150, 000 Japanese were cut off in
Indo-China and Thailand by a probing finger of Chinese columns, 120, 000
Japanese soldiers were counted dead in Burma with the disease-ridden
remnants ready to surrender to Mountbatten, 300, 000 troops, scattered
through the islands of Indonesia and Melanesia and engaged by the
Australians, were just trying to live, 142, 000 troops were bypassed and
withering on the vine in the Philippines, Carolines etc.

Third, you wrote:

> Just to "comfort" you I could perhaps give you the statistics of how ma=
ny =

> "ethnic european"(or even "arian" people..just a joke, DBU) were killed=
by
> their "fellow" Europeans and Americans?? =


I respectfully decline your offer of "comfort" among other things on the
following grounds:
1) I do not need you to comfort me.
2) I am not a racist and would never in any circumstance take comfort in
people, no matter what their colour, being killed. I believe in equal
justice for all peoples of the world including but not limited to white
people. What I am against is the notion of white supremacy.

Fourth, you wrote:

> Actually, I think the meaning was to drop three bombs, but b'cause of
> clouds over one city they only dropped two...

I think you are mixing your facts here. America developed only TWO
atomic bombs during the war. The then American War Secretary, Stimson,
in an article he wrote in Harper=B4s Magazine after Hiroshima, says that
it was impossible to demonstrate the atomic bombs because the US had
only two and if they had demonstrated them and failed, they would have
lost face. (US News & World Report, August 15, 1960) I think that what
you have confused is that when bad weather made it impossible for Major
Charles W. Sweeney to hit his primary target, he had only enough gas to
hit Nagasaki, his second-choice target. (TIME Magazine, August 20, 1945)
It was thus just because of bad luck that Nagasaki was hit. The original
targets for the atomic bombs were: Kyoto, Hiroshima, Yokohama, Kokura
Arsenal and Niigata with the first four being the first choices
(declassified minutes of the second meeting of the Target Committee, Los
Alamos, May 10-11, 1945).

Fifth, on my assertion that the decision to drop the bombs on Japan was
motivated by racist tendencies you replied:

> Simply because when they dropped the bombs on Japan, Berlin was roaming=

> with allied and russian troops..how's that for logic...:-)
> =


I do not buy that "logic". In a letter justifying his decision to bomb
the Japanese cities on 11 August 1945, US president Harry S. Truman
wrote: "the only language [the Japanese] seem to understand is the one
we have been using to bombard them. When you have to deal with a beast
you have to treat him as a beast. It is most regrettable but
nevertheless true". (Living Marxism issue 81, July/August 1995) In
trying to understand the racist tendencies behind the bombing of Japan,
one has to take into consideration the threat Japan represented to the
idea of white supremacy in Asia. Japan=B4s victory over Russia in 1905
made it a force to be reckoned with on the world stage. This plus the
victories that Japan achieved against the Americans, British, French and
Dutch between 1941 and 1943. The loss of prestige plus potential loss
of colonies that this represented prompted Antony Eden, who was to later
become a Tory foreign secretary and prime minister, to emphasise the
importance of "effectively asserting white-race superiority in the Far
East." (Living Marxism issue 81, July/August 1995) A top British
official in China, Sir Frederick Maze, described the conflict as "not
merely Japan against Great Britain" but also "the Orient against the
Occident- the Yellow race against the White race:" (Living Marxism issue
81, July/August 1995) =

Many of the Western leaders so believed in the sub-human nature of the
Japanese that they believed that Japan wouldn=B4t dare to fight the white=

powers. The British commander-in-chief of the Far East, peering into
Japanese-occupied China from Hong Kong in 1940 described seeing "various
sub-human species dressed in dirty grey uniform, which I was informed
were Japanese soldiers... I cannot believe they would form an
intelligent fighting force". (Living Marxism issue 81, July/August 1995)
Now tell me Torstein if there wasn=B4t the hint of racism in dropping the=

atomic bombs on Japan. You see, Japan posed a threat not only
militarily. It also posed a political challenge to white power that
could release Asian nationalism. As a result the Western powers were
"fighting a race war, in which the enemy had to be not just contained,
but crushed if the white powers were to maintain any authority in Asia."
(Living Marxism issue 81, July/August 1995) As Churchill bluntly put it,
Asian people were "dirty baboos" and "chinks" in need of a good
thrashing with the "sjambok". (Living Marxism issue 81, July/August
1995)

I=B4ll stop here now because it is getting late and I have to go to work
tomorrow. I=B4ll send the continuation in part 2 around Thursday/Friday
because I=B4ll be very busy tomorrow and Wednesday. Until then, have a
good evening. Thanks.
Buharry.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 18:26:26 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
Message-ID: <3674015.34df90a5@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

The results today are:

Dem. Rep. of Congo(Zaire) Vs Togo 2 - 1
Ghana Vs Tunis 2 - 0
Zambia Vs Morocco 1 - 1

Peace

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 18:57:05 -0500
From: "William Roberts" <wcroberts@osprey.smcm.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: African Cup of Nations' Results -Reply
Message-ID: <s4df51ab.083@osprey.smcm.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline

Hi Tombong -
Just a quick note from your friend at St. Mary's College of Maryland. I =
have a copy of *Tubabs Under the Baobab* written by the students who went =
to Gambia in the summer of 1996 for you. Please let me know where to send =
it.

Best Regards,
Bill Roberts, assistant professor of Anthropology
St. Mary's College of Maryland


>>> <TSaidy1050@aol.com> 02/09/98 06:26pm >>>
The results today are:

Dem. Rep. of Congo(Zaire) Vs Togo 2 - 1
Ghana Vs Tunis 2 - 0
Zambia Vs Morocco 1 - 1

Peace

Tombong Saidy


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 20:08:24 -0800
From: "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <199802100227.UAA00740@mailhost.cyberramp.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr.Sall:
I wholeheartedly concur with your views on the closure of the radio
station. If the closure stemmed from political motives, we are headed in
the wrong direction. Attempts on the part of the government to censor the
media is the complete antithesis of what they professed to want to create
in the Gambia; a just society.
On the other hand, in all fairness if the closure is due to the reasons
stated by Mr. Saidy, I must say it was irresponsible on the part of the
station.
Whatever the case may be, I hope they find a solution to the problem.
The station provides an alternate listening choice for large group of
listeners. Any delays to resume operation will be a grave disappointment to
a large number of listeners.
Morro Krubally
----------
> From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
> Date: Sunday, February 08, 1998 6:08 PM
>
>
> I totally agree with with what Amadou said. I think nothing should be
done
> to restrict the freedom of expression. At this stage in our history, the
> spaces for free inquiry and expression should be increased, not
> restricted. If it is suspected that there has been abuse of that freedom,
the correct thing to do is to investigate and take the matter to
> before the courts. The quality of a government is guaged partly in the
way
> it relates with people holding different views. High-handed methods
should
> be a thing of the past that we do should not even want to remember.
>
> Thanks, Tombong, for posting this information to the list. But I,
> personally, am not interested in the family connections between the
> spouse of Mr Jobarteh and Baboucar Gueye: that is
> simply not the issue.
>
> With all best wishes,
>
> Ebrima Sall.
>
> On Sun, 8 Feb 1998, A. Scattred Janneh wrote:
>
> > TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
> > >
> > > Gambia-l,
> > >
> > > The Department of State for Works, Communication and Information has
closed
> > > Citizen FM, one of the five private radio stations in The Gambia. It
is closed
> > > for the following reasons:
> > >
> > > 1. Failure to pay taxes
> > > 2. Failure to pay social security deductions for his employees
> > > 3. Failure to pay 1997 license fee
> > > 4. Failure to register the radio station with the registrar of
companies
> > > (Attorney Generals Chamber - Justice Department)
> > > 5. For announcing an unconfirmed story notifying the public about a
shake-up
> > > in National Intelligence Agency (NIA), a story with national security
> > > implications.
> > >
> > > Citizen FM was closed on Friday, following the arrest and detention
of Mr.
> > > Baboucar Gaye, the propriety and Ebrima Sillah, News Editor on
Thursday,
> > > February 5th, 1998. They were arrested following a news report on
their 'News
> > > at 10', claiming that a director at the NIA, Lamin Jobarteh, has been
sacked
> > > from the agency in connection with alleged 'counterfeit scandal'
amounting to
> > > about D26, 000 (bribery). They are still in detention and may be they
will be
> > > released tomorrow after securing a bail.
> > >
> > > Mr. Jobarteh has actually been dismissed from the service and the
interesting
> > > thing is that he is married to Baboucar Gaye's younger sister.
> > >
> > > You will be updated on further development on this case. I will post
the full
> > > press release as soon as i lay my hands on it.
> > >
> > > PEACE
> > >
> > > Tombong Saidy
> >
> >
> > Tombong:
> >
> > "Enquiring minds want to know:"
> > (1) why Mr. Jobarteh was fired
> > (2) why the government waited until the NIA story to shut down the
> > radio station if it has not been in compliance with tax laws for
> > quite a while
> > (3) why the government took such drastic measures (arresting Mr. Gaye
> > and his News Editor) and shutting the radio station.
> >
> > I believe the action is a significant setback for press freedom and
free
> > expression in The Gambia. If nothing else, the arrests will have a
> > further chilling effect on the independent media. Recall the excerpt I
> > sent to the list from the US State Department which stated that the
> > official media is largely a propaganda tool of the government? If
> > that's the case, this new development would worsen the situation.
> >
> > Salaam!
> > Amadou SJ
> >
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 22:11:06 EST
From: BAKSAWA@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <694521f7.34dfc54c@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Brother Morro:

That was a point well made, and borrowing Bass' trademark - "Keep Up The Good
Work Down There!!!!"

Peace


Awa Sey
******************************************************************************
**************

In a message dated 98-02-09, Morro wrote:
<<
Mr.Sall:
I wholeheartedly concur with your views on the closure of the radio
station. If the closure stemmed from political motives, we are headed in
the wrong direction. Attempts on the part of the government to censor the
media is the complete antithesis of what they professed to want to create
in the Gambia; a just society.
On the other hand, in all fairness if the closure is due to the reasons
stated by Mr. Saidy, I must say it was irresponsible on the part of the
station.
Whatever the case may be, I hope they find a solution to the problem.
The station provides an alternate listening choice for large group of
listeners. Any delays to resume operation will be a grave disappointment to
a large number of listeners.
Morro Krubally
----------
> From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
> Date: Sunday, February 08, 1998 6:08 PM
>
>
> I totally agree with with what Amadou said. I think nothing should be
done
> to restrict the freedom of expression. At this stage in our history, the
> spaces for free inquiry and expression should be increased, not
> restricted. If it is suspected that there has been abuse of that freedom,
the correct thing to do is to investigate and take the matter to
> before the courts. The quality of a government is guaged partly in the
way
> it relates with people holding different views. High-handed methods
should
> be a thing of the past that we do should not even want to remember.
>
> Thanks, Tombong, for posting this information to the list. But I,
> personally, am not interested in the family connections between the
> spouse of Mr Jobarteh and Baboucar Gueye: that is
> simply not the issue.
>
> With all best wishes,
>
> Ebrima Sall.
>
> On Sun, 8 Feb 1998, A. Scattred Janneh wrote:
>
> > TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
> > >
> > > Gambia-l,
> > >
> > > The Department of State for Works, Communication and Information has
closed
> > > Citizen FM, one of the five private radio stations in The Gambia. It
is closed
> > > for the following reasons:
> > >
> > > 1. Failure to pay taxes
> > > 2. Failure to pay social security deductions for his employees
> > > 3. Failure to pay 1997 license fee
> > > 4. Failure to register the radio station with the registrar of
companies
> > > (Attorney Generals Chamber - Justice Department)
> > > 5. For announcing an unconfirmed story notifying the public about a
shake-up
> > > in National Intelligence Agency (NIA), a story with national security
> > > implications.
> > >
> > > Citizen FM was closed on Friday, following the arrest and detention
of Mr.
> > > Baboucar Gaye, the propriety and Ebrima Sillah, News Editor on
Thursday,
> > > February 5th, 1998. They were arrested following a news report on
their 'News
> > > at 10', claiming that a director at the NIA, Lamin Jobarteh, has been
sacked
> > > from the agency in connection with alleged 'counterfeit scandal'
amounting to
> > > about D26, 000 (bribery). They are still in detention and may be they
will be
> > > released tomorrow after securing a bail.
> > >
> > > Mr. Jobarteh has actually been dismissed from the service and the
interesting
> > > thing is that he is married to Baboucar Gaye's younger sister.
> > >
> > > You will be updated on further development on this case. I will post
the full
> > > press release as soon as i lay my hands on it.
> > >
> > > PEACE
> > >
> > > Tombong Saidy
> >
> >
> > Tombong:
> >
> > "Enquiring minds want to know:"
> > (1) why Mr. Jobarteh was fired
> > (2) why the government waited until the NIA story to shut down the
> > radio station if it has not been in compliance with tax laws for
> > quite a while
> > (3) why the government took such drastic measures (arresting Mr. Gaye
> > and his News Editor) and shutting the radio station.
> >
> > I believe the action is a significant setback for press freedom and
free
> > expression in The Gambia. If nothing else, the arrests will have a
> > further chilling effect on the independent media. Recall the excerpt I
> > sent to the list from the US State Department which stated that the
> > official media is largely a propaganda tool of the government? If
> > that's the case, this new development would worsen the situation.
> >
> > Salaam!
> > Amadou SJ
> >
>

Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

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R >>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 22:41:51 EST
From: JENGFANNEH@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: African Americans and US Policy Toward Africa (fwd)
Message-ID: <3b5be993.34dfcc81@aol.com>
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Thank you Mr.Sall for the information. You seem to be a very smart and
reasonable person, and I am sure you will agree that the position of the
Boston Centre is an extremist, out of character, baseless and unfounded view.

Sir, what only puzzle me is why would you even waste your time to think that
this view deserve to be heard, and don't get me wrong,every position can be
fair game as long as it is atleast within the realm of constructiveness. Jesse
Jackson, to be used by the Clinton Administration to exploit
Africa............This is a riduculous statement.

Musa Jeng

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 23:11:54 -0600
From: Francis Njie <c3p0@xsite.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19980209231154.0075e368@xsite.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
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If the freedom and livelihood of the detained proprietor and news editor of
Citizen FM were not at stake, I would probably not have acknowledged the
ridiculous justifications for their summary arrest.

What exactly is the legal basis of government-sanctioned summary detention
for libel?

- Francis



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 23:54:25 EST
From: JENGFANNEH@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <5d0cd03c.34dfdd83@aol.com>
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Thanks again for the information about the hot issue between Citizen FM and
the Government. Time is rather scarce but I can't help to throw in a word or
two. My daughter told me not to trust most Gambians over thirty years old. It
would be unfair to judge you, bit I am trying to reconcile the Tombong of the
early eighties and the one that sometimes sound like someone playing survival
politics. As a media person, one would have expected you to be on the same
fense with Baboucarr. Close down for not paying taxes, and you for a moment
think anyone would belive that.

Musa

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 01:17:58 -0800
From: Anna Secka <secka@cse.bridgeport.edu>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Condolences
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Hello All,
I would like to thank everyone for being supportive at a time like
this. It was indeed a shock for all the family and most of their peers.
It is hard for people to accept the loss of a loved one in
their prime. Nevertheless, it is Allah's rule so we cannot do anything
about it but pray for them. Once again, thanks a lot for all the
support.

-----
Anna Secka
secka@cse.bridgeport.edu

* Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent.
-- Salvor Hardin

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 03:52:34 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <788843f7.34e01554@aol.com>
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Musa,

Your daughter might be right and you should start by trying to reconciling
yourself first. Why not try to reconcile the Musa Jeng of Mr. Faal's days at
Kaur from Musa Jeng of today.

You better go back to my posting and read it carefully before assuming on
which side I am. I reported what happened, and not stating an opinion on the
matter.

PEACE

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 08:04:05 -0000
From: "archibald.graham@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
Message-ID: <B0000051334@south.commit.gm>
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Sent by "Archibald H. R. Graham" <archibald.graham@commit.gm>
via Commit


King Solomon

You earlier wrote:

> I have been panning east to west on our satelite system, to see if I can
> find anything from the European satelites in regards to this tornament
> in Bokina Faso, but no luck. I have even tried the cable companies, who
> I know can arrange to get this event. But their response a question of
> interest, marketability, and sponsors.

Oh dear, sorry about that. What a world we live in with little regard for
events other than War in this part of the world!!

You can try CFI - Canal France International. Your chances of viewing the
events with them throughout are high. Otherwise some of us here like
Tombong Saidy may have to fill you on the events as they unfold.

Regards
Archi


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 13:43:05 +0100
From: momodou@inform-bbs.dk (Momodou Camara)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Fwd: Africa: Regional Executives Statement
Message-ID: <3634212767.9168292@inform-bbs.dk>

---forwarded mail START---
From: apic@igc.apc.org,Internet
To: apic@igc.org,Internet
Date: 09/02/98 15:04
Subject: Africa: Regional Executives Statement
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Africa: Regional Executives Statement
Date distributed (ymd): 980209
Document reposted by APIC

+++++++++++++++++++++Document Profile+++++++++++++++++++++

Region: Continent-Wide
Issue Areas: +economy/development+ +security/peace+
Summary Contents:
This posting contains the text of the Joint Statement made by
the Chief Executives of the Organisation for African Unity,
United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, and African
Development Bank at the end of their meeting in Abidjan, Cote
D'Ivoire, on 23 January 1998.

+++++++++++++++++end profile++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

JOINT STATEMENT
OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVES OF THE OAU, ECA AND ADB

Introduction

1. We, the Chief Executives of the Organization of African
Unity (OAU), the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), and
the African Development Bank (ADB), met in Abidjan, Cote
d'Ivoire on 23 January, 1998, for our 8th Consultative
Meeting. We set out below our views on recent developments in
the region, and also indicate the measures we believe our
countries should consider to assure the economic and social
development of the people of Africa in peace and stability.

Political Developments

2. In reviewing the political, social, and economic progress
in the region in the last few years, we note, with
satisfaction, the strong commitment to political stability,
pluralism, and democracy by an increasing number of countries.
Nonetheless, we are concerned by the continued instability and
conflict in some of our countries and their cost in human and
material terms, as well as their adverse impact on economic
and social progress. We are, however, heartened by the efforts
being made by African leaders to take action to find African
solutions to the various conflicts in the region. We are also
greatly encouraged by the role that the institutions of civil
society are playing.

3. We wish, in this connection, to underscore the need to take
measures to avoid the recurrence of conflicts, provide
humanitarian assistance, and mobilize resources for
post-conflict reconstruction and rehabilitation. This is, in
particular, the case with the Great Lakes Region. We wish to
emphasize here the importance of adequate support by the
international donor community to help this region, as well as
other regions emerging from periods of severe strife and
conflict. With a view to coordinating our efforts, and
bringing to the attention of the international community the
need for action in this area, we have decided to establish a
committee to recommend practical measures for our
consideration.

4. Sustaining the political, economic, and social progress
that our countries have made calls for promoting the practice
of good governance. We are, in this respect, encouraged by the
increasing commitment in the region to this goal. We,
nonetheless, urge our countries to continue to promote good
governance, uphold the rule of law, and fight the scourge of
corruption, as an integral part of their efforts to promote
socio-economic progress in the continent.

Economic and Social Trends

5. We are pleased to note that, in comparison to the first
half of this decade, the economic performance of a large
number of African countries has, in the past few years, been
quite encouraging. While in part underpinned by a favourable
external environment, the progress being made is, nonetheless,
mainly a reflection of the major economic reforms undertaken
by a large number of countries. We urge our countries to
deepen and sustain these reforms, as difficult as they
sometimes are.

6. We also urge our countries to pursue policies to accelerate
economic growth, as this is essential to improve the social
conditions of the large number of Africans who live in
absolute poverty. In this regard, our countries will also need
to create an environment conducive to private sector
development, as well as for attracting foreign capital flows,
which still account for less than two percent of global flows.

7. An issue of great concern to our three institutions is the
external debt of African countries, which is hampering their
growth. This is estimated to have reached $315 billion in
1997, with the debt service of countries accounting, on
average, for a quarter of export earnings. We are encouraged
by the start in the implementation of various debt-reduction
initiatives, including the Highly Indebted Poor Countries'
Initiative (HIPC) -- a joint initiative of the Bretton Woods
Institutions, the African Development Bank (ADB), and
bilateral donors -- as well as the Special Financing Mechanism
(SFM) of the ADB. Nonetheless, we urge the international
community to adopt a more flexible stance, and to consider
additional initiatives, as well as ensure that adequate
resources are made available to resolve the debt problem of
African countries.

8. With respect to regional co-operation and integration, we
note the encouraging steps recently taken by countries and
sub-regions. Nonetheless, much needs to be done to make this
goal a reality. Accordingly, we have renewed our commitment to
jointly work together to assist our countries in the
rationalization of the activities of Regional Economic
Communities (RECs), the harmonization of policies at the
regional level, the mobilization of resource for regional
integration, and the promotion of a greater role for the
private sector. We have also decided to establish a joint
working group to coordinate the activities of the three
institutions in this area.

9. And in the light of the important role of air transport
(and the transport and telecommunication infrastructures in
general) to regional integration efforts, we have agreed to
sensitize our governments on the importance of taking various
measures to bring about a reform of the industry and to
develop safe, accessible and affordable air service. There is
also a need to gradually liberalize traffic rights within
Africa and to promote cooperation in the air transport
industry. With a view to achieving this goal and mobilizing
the requisite resources, we have agreed to work closely with
other concerned regional and international organizations.

10. While urging our countries to pursue domestic economic
policies conducive to rapid economic growth and poverty
alleviation, we wish to stress the continuing important role
of external concessional resources. We thus urge the
international donor community to continue to provide adequate
replenishment to such funds as the African Development Fund
(ADF), the International Development Association (IDA), and
the Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility (ESAF). And,
cognizant of the need to ensure that African countries have
adequate access to existing resources, such as the European
Development Fund (EDF) under the Lome Convention and the
Global Environmental Facility (GEF), we have agreed that our
three institutions will cooperate to provide the requisite
technical assistance, as well as initiate capacity-building
measures, to enhance the negotiating capability of African
countries.

11. We are encouraged by the increasing interest shown in the
development of Africa as reflected in such initiatives as the
System-Wide Special Initiative for Africa of the United
Nations as well as those of the OECD countries. In this
context, we note that Africa's developmental needs will be
discussed at the second Tokyo International Conference on
African Development (TICAD II). We expect the Conference to be
open to all African countries and to take up a number of
important issues relating to the development prospects of the
region. We have also agreed that our three institutions will
undertake preparatory work in four important areas, namely,
the continued availability of concessional resources to
African countries, international market access for African
goods and products, private sector participation in
infrastructural development, and conflict management, peace,
and development.

Joint Secretariat

12. To enhance coordination and a better exchange of
information between our three institutions, we have agreed to
strengthen our Joint Secretariat. In addition, we have agreed
to deepen our working relations by setting up working groups,
by encouraging contacts between our various organizational
units, and promoting co-operation at the expert level.

13. In conclusion, we reaffirm our commitment to develop
further a common approach, as well as deepen our collaborative
efforts, to assist our countries meet better the challenges of
economic and social development.

Signed:

- Salim A. Salim, Secretary General, OAU
- K.Y. Amoako, UN Under-Secretary General and Executive
Secretary, ECA
- Omar Kabbaj, President, African Development Bank

Abidjan 23 January 1998

For more information, please contact:

Peter K.A. da Costa, Senior Communication Adviser
UN Economic Commission for Africa
P.O. Box 3001 (official) or 3005 (personal)
Addis Ababa Ethiopia
Tel: +251-1-51 58 26 (direct) or: +251-1-51 72 00 ext. 35486
Fax: +251-1-51-22-33
E-Mail: ipspdc@harare.iafrica.com,
daCosta@un.org,ecainfo@un.org
Web: http://www.un.org/depts/eca

************************************************************
This material is being reposted for wider distribution by the
Africa Policy Information Center (APIC), the educational
affiliate of the Washington Office on Africa. APIC's primary
objective is to widen the policy debate in the United States
around African issues and the U.S. role in Africa, by
concentrating on providing accessible policy-relevant
information and analysis usable by a wide range of groups and
individuals.

Auto-response addresses for more information (send any e-mail
message): africapolicy-info@igc.apc.org (about the Africa
Policy Electronic Distribution List); apic-info@igc.apc.org
(about APIC); woa-info@igc.apc.org (about WOA). Documents
previously distributed, as well as the auto-response
information files, are also available on the Web at:
http://www.africapolicy.org

To be added to or dropped from the distribution list write to
apic@igc.apc.org. For more information about material cited
from another source please contact directly the source
mentioned in the posting rather than APIC.

For additional information: Africa Policy Information Center,
110 Maryland Ave. NE, #509, Washington, DC 20002. Phone:
202-546-7961. Fax: 202-546-1545. E-mail: apic@igc.apc.org.
************************************************************
---forwarded mail END---






--- OffRoad 1.9v registered to Momodou Camara




------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 15:10:36 +0100
From: "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
To: Gambia-L@U.Washington.edu
Subject: Africa/Economy. Asia, Europe and Africa's CFA Franc. 2 Feb 98
Message-ID: <C12565A7.004DB5F0.00@wfp.org>
Mime-Version: 1.0
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List Manager,
Please forward for info. only. Housainou.
---------------------- Forwarded by Housainou Taal/OD/WFP on 10-02-98 15:07
---------------------------

From:

To:
cc:
Subject:



AFRICA/ECONOMY - CFA ZONE

Asia, Europe and Africa's CFA Franc [FEATURE ARTICLE]
01:08 a.m. Feb 02, 1998 Eastern

By Alan Raybould

ABIDJAN, Feb 2 (Reuters) - The dramatic falls in Asian currencies have
added a new twist to the debate over the future of Africa's CFA franc
after the likely demise of the French franc to which it is linked.

The CFA franc is used by 14 African states, former French colonies for
the most part and competitors of southeast Asian countries in markets
such as cocoa, coffee, timber and palmoil.

The finance minister of Ivory Coast -- the world's biggest cocoa
producer -- said in January that Europe's move to a single currency
would not affect the CFA franc, which would be fixed against the euro at
a rate ``mechanically'' derived from its current fixed parity of 100 per
French franc.

However, N'Goran Niamien added: ``What's happening in Asia concerns us
to the highest degree.''

Other observers recognise the new factor in the equation.

``The Asian crisis is going to pose a problem of competitiveness for our
economies, and that's where the real debate on any adjustment of the CFA
franc in the context of the euro will be situated,'' said Michel
Abrogoua, manager of the new West Africa Growth Fund which is committed
to the Franc Zone.

The CFA franc is used by Benin, Burkina Faso, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory
Coast, Mali, Niger, Senegal and Togo in West Africa, and Cameroon,
Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea and Gabon in
Central Africa.

The Comoros Islands also belong to the Franc Zone but do not use the CFA
franc.

AN AFRICAN HARD CURRENCY -- IN THEORY

The French Treasury guarantees to exchange the CFA franc for French
francs, making it -- in theory -- a rare African hard currency.

Its parity went unchanged for 45 years until 1994 at 50 to one French
franc, a source of stability for the mostly French firms that did
business in the Zone.

But by the 1980s, low commodity prices and high external debt burdens
had brought stagnation into the Franc Zone, and that stability was no
longer such a virtue for countries that needed to diversify their
exports and their trading partners.

The African countries were forced to swallow a devaluation by the World
Bank, International Monetary Fund and France, whose about-turn was seen
as a betrayal in Africa.

Rumours are rife in the Zone that the advent of the euro could be the
occasion for another parity adjustment.

Bankers in Africa say some businesses are switching funds into French
francs as a precaution, and the central banks of the Zone -- the BCEAO
in West Africa, the BEAC in Central Africa and the Bank of France -- are
tightening the screws.

It has become increasingly difficult to get even small amounts of French
francs in exchange for CFA francs in Ivory Coast's commercial capital,
Abidjan. Sometimes banks demand a flight ticket to Paris as proof the
need is ``genuine.''

``The BCEAO is supposed to change CFA into French francs on demand, but
it says there aren't any, come back in a month. It's a deliberate policy
on the part of the Bank,'' the treasurer of one Abidjan bank said.

In fact, full convertibility of the CFA franc was never really
established after it was halted in 1993 to stop capital flight when
devaluation began to look inevitable.

THEORY DIFFERS FROM PRACTICE

Alain Le Noir, who heads a club of francophone African bank chiefs, said
this made a nonsense of the Franc Zone edifice.

``Recently, a French consultant, paid in CFA francs for work done in
Ivory Coast, was unable to exchange his CFA francs for French francs,
not only at the best banks in France, but more seriously at the Bank of
France itself,'' he said.

The crunch may come at the beginning of May, when European countries
meet to decide which of them will be eligible to join European economic
and monetary union (EMU) in 1999, and to set bilateral exchange rates as
a basis for their euro parities.

Some European countries are unhappy about the CFA franc being attached
to their new currency, but French ministers and officials have travelled
to Africa to promise that both the link and value of the CFA franc will
be assured when the euro comes.

HOW MUCH LONGER WILL SYSTEM LAST?

However, one African financier, with experience of both the private
sector and the multilateral agencies, doubted the system would stay as
it is for very much longer.

``The French Treasury's guarantee might be given for now, but I don't
think the French are going to accept this situation over the medium
term, because they don't have the means,'' he said.

``What you might see, as a kind of half-way solution, is a link with the
euro but with a margin of manoeuvre, so the CFA franc will no longer be
tied into a too rigid system.''

The two parts of the Zone may even split in two -- officials in West
Africa, moving fast towards economic union, increasingly qualify their
support for the CFA franc rate to their own area.

But in the meantime Antoine Pouillieute, head of French development
agency Caisse Francaise de Developpement, dismisses rumours of
devaluation in either region linked to the advent of the euro as
``flights of fancy.''

``The economies of the Franc Zone, whether in Central or West Africa,
are going in the right direction,'' he said in Cameroon in January.
``The rate...poses no problem of competitivity in the zone. Technically,
unlike in 1994, there is no economic reason to justify a devaluation.''

($ - 600 CFA francs)

Copyright 1998 Reuters Limited





------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 15:34:21 +0100
From: "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
To: Gambia-L@U.Washington.edu
Subject: France Revises African Relationship. WashPost. 6 Feb 98
Message-ID: <C12565A7.004F8B5B.00@wfp.org>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii




List Manager,
Please forward to members for info. only. Housainou.
---------------------- Forwarded by Housainou Taal/OD/WFP on 10-02-98 15:27
---------------------------


Housainou Taal
10-02-98 15:08

To: Gambia-L@U.Washington.edu
cc:
Subject: France Revises African Relationship. WashPost. 6 Feb 98

List manager,
Please forward for infor only. Housainou
---------------------- Forwarded by Housainou Taal/OD/WFP on 10-02-98 15:05
---------------------------

From:

To:
cc:
Subject:



FRENCH FOREIGN POLICY/AFRICA 30 January - 6 February 1998

1. France Revises African Relationship. Washington Post. 6 Feb 98
2. France overhauls aid policy for developing nations. Reuters. 4 Feb
98 [adds different details]
3. Abidjan asks France to clarify African cooperation programme. AFP.
30 Jan 98

****************************************

1. France Revises African Relationship

Reform Plan Abolishes Ministry, Separate Policy for Former Colonies

By Charles Trueheart
Washington Post Foreign Service
Friday, February 6, 1998; Page A40

PARIS, Feb. 5?The government of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin today
outlined a potentially far-reaching reform of France's relationship with
its African "back yard," a sphere of influence dating from the colonial
era that once guaranteed France the support of a major bloc of African
votes at the United Nations.

Since the French colonial empire in Africa gave way to independence
nearly 40 years ago, France has maintained close ties to most of its
former colonies through a de facto ministry for African affairs known as
the Ministry for Cooperation, a powerful agency virtually independent of
the rest of France's diplomatic apparatus.

Over the years, French leaders, beginning with President Charles de
Gaulle in the 1960s, have yearned to drive a stake through the heart of
the Cooperation Ministry. But they have always surrendered to pressures
from the bureaucracy and its constituency -- African leaders who saw the
ministry as their special conduit to political influence and foreign
aid.

The new reform plan reflects France's continuing retrenchment in Africa
as the United States becomes more active there and Paris's desire to
forge economic relationships in English-speaking African countries,
notably South Africa. It represents a new phase in France's efforts to
break out of almost four decades of quasi-colonialism and another step
in the rejiggering of global relationships in the post-Cold War era.

Jospin's eight-month-old Socialist government from the beginning has
signaled its desire to break with past policy toward Africa.

France's military presence on the continent is being cut by one-fourth,
and this month it will participate with the United States and Britain in
training French-speaking African soldiers for peacekeeping operations on
the continent -- a tacit relinquishment of France's exclusive military
domain that would have been unthinkable even five years ago.

Thus far, Jospin's government has worked effectively on the African
dossier with President Jacques Chirac, whose Gaullist party was defeated
in legislative elections last year. Although he swore three years ago on
a visit to Benin that the cherished Cooperation Ministry would exist as
long as he was president, Chirac gave his blessing to the Jospin plan.

The machinery of the reform is bureaucratic: The Cooperation Ministry
will be absorbed into the Foreign Ministry, where, at least in theory,
Africa will be a world region like any other. Charles Josselin, the
incumbent cooperation minister, said France will cease to have a
separate foreign policy for French-speaking African countries.

When the reforms are refined and put in place later this year, Josselin
will become a junior minister under Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine. But
he will keep a place at the cabinet table to reassure African leaders
who fear they will lose their clout and privileged access.

Such are the sensitivities regarding this move that every official
effort has been made to stress that France is not abandoning its special
friends. Because of its high levels of poverty, French-speaking Africa
will continue to constitute a "priority zone of solidarity" for French
development assistance, officials said today.

"No one will lose," Vedrine said at a news conference.

At stake for developing countries is French foreign aid that amounts to
almost $8 billion a year -- on a per capita basis, more than three times
the U.S. foreign aid budget. About two-thirds of it goes to African
countries.

The change also will enable France to act in concert with other donor
nations and organizations, such as the United Nations, the European
Union, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. France's aid
to African nations and others in Asia and the Caribbean has been heavily
redirected in recent years through those organizations, limiting its
direct largess to favored countries.

French officials today spoke of "coherence" as the objective of the
reform, but the relationship between France and Africa will continue to
operate at several levels.

In addition to the newly reconstituted Foreign Ministry, rival centers
of power remain at the presidential palace, which has long regarded
Africa as a special preserve, and at the Finance Ministry, whose power
over foreign aid funds has been enhanced under the new scheme.

? Copyright 1998 The Washington Post Company
____________________________________________

Some added details:

2. France overhauls aid policy for developing nations

By Francois Raitberger

PARIS, Feb 4 (Reuters) - France announced a major overhaul on Wednesday
of aid to developing countries that reflected world economic changes and
a new approach towards its former colonies.

Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin said development aid would remain
focused on Africa and would not shrink, but would be "concentrated on
those countries which most need it".

State aid units, which have often carried out their work shrouded in
secrecy as France clung to a fading aura as an African post-colonial
superpower, will be merged under the foreign ministry into "a large
diplomatic body" to make them more open and efficient.

"Africa has moved. Despite historical handicaps, and such scourges as
AIDS, it now has higher economic growth rates and stronger aspirations
to democracy," Jospin told the National Assembly.

"We had to take this evolution into account," he said.

The reform, announced at a cabinet meeting, is part of wider plans by
Jospin's seven-month-old government to review relations with Africa,
including almost halving French troops which have often acted as
kingmakers there.

The State Secretariat for Cooperation, which has sometimes been dubbed
"ministry of the colonies", will be turned into a ministry under the
direct authority of Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine, with a single
budget for both.

Under plans approved on Wednesday in a cabinet meeting chaired by
President Jacques Chirac, a committee grouping representatives of nine
ministries will aportion aid under finance ministry control.

It will define which countries qualify as members of a "Priority
Solidarity Zone" which will get the bulk of the aid, set to remain at a
total 38 billion francs ($6.3 billion) or 0.45 percent of gross domestic
product.

Jospin said the zone would include all the countries which are now
members of France's Aid and Cooperation Fund -- most of France's former
African colonies, some of the continent's other poorest states as well
as Haiti and Cambodia.

But membership could change in the future as economic conditions evolve.

Government officials said cooperation had to adapt to recent economic
changes, which left some poor countries dependent on foreign state aid
while others could rely more on private investment.

Conservative Gaullist Jacques Baumel, head of the National Assembly
Defence Committee, launched a blistering attack on the reform as
spelling the end of France's traditional links with Africa "at a time
when some countries make no mystery of their determination to edge us
out".

France has suffered recent setbacks in Africa as it backed the
overthrown Hutu government blamed for the genocide in Rwanda, and its
ally, Mobutu Sese Seko, was ousted in Zaire by the Rwanda-backed rebels
of President Laurent Kabila.

"(The reform) will weaken the exceptionally close links between the
continent and our nation by drowning French aid to Africa into the funds
we grant to all kinds of countries in the world," Baumel said.

He said that scrapping the State Secretariat for Cooperation was "a bad
blow to an essential part of Gaullist policy" towards Africa.

Under a practice set under the late president Charles de Gaulle,
France's African policy was often conducted in discreet deals made with
African presidents by secretive French presidential envoys.

Jospin said defence accords with African countries would remain in the
hands of the French defence council that groups the president, the prime
minister and the foreign and defence ministers. France announced last
July it would cut troops in Africa by 40 percent to 5,000 from 8,350.

Copyright (c) 1998 Reuters
Received by NewsEDGE/LAN: 04-02-98 17:31 gmt+2
____________________________________________

3. Abidjan asks France to clarify African cooperation programme

by Adnane Zaka

ABIDJAN, Jan 30 (AFP) - Ivory Coast, once one of France's leading
political and economic partners in Africa, took advantage Friday of a
visit by French junior cooperation minister Charles Josselin to ask for
details of planned reforms.

The French secretary of state for cooperation had talks in the economic
capital Abidjan with Ivorian Minister of Foreign Affairs Amara Essy, who
later said he had asked for clarification of the reforms due early in
February.

The French plan, which has been delayed on several occasions, notably
provides for the merger of the cooperation ministry, considered by many
French-speaking countries as "the African ministry", into the foreign
ministry.

Without going much further, Essy said of he had been told: "It is what
we had expected."

"France is a sovereign country and it is up to us to see where our own
interests lie," Essy added, stressing that "there is no problem between
Ivory Coast and France."

Francophone African leaders of former colonies have shown fears that the
extension by the Socialist Party government in Paris of the foreign
ministry's activities, henceforth expected to deal with nations of the
continent as equal partners, would leave them high and dry and end
long-standing "special relations" with Africa,

On general politics, Essy said he and Josselin had discussed
developments across the continent, notably in the ethnically troubled
Great Lakes region, where Rwanda and Burundi are swept by conflcit
between the mainly Tutsi armies and extremist Hutu rebels, and the
English-speaking countries of Liberia and Sierra Leone, in which Ivory
Coast has major regional interests.

Liberia is emerging from a brutal civil war and Sierra Leone is
currently run by a military junta allied to former rebels, who have
promised to restore power to elected civilian authorities next April.
Fighting continues in Sierra Leone, whose economy has been savaged by
the conflict.

Josselin, who arrived in Abidjan on Thursday evening, was also received
by Ivorian President Henri Konan Bedie and took part in a meeting of a
steering committee on the "Franc Zone initiative for investment" at the
Ivorian headquarters of the Central Bank of West African States.

The Franc Zone groups African nations whose CFA currency is pegged to
the French franc.

Josselin stated that "investment remains insufficient in the zone" in
spite of the 50 percent devaluation of the CFA franc in January 1994,
which took the rate to 100 CFA for one French franc, and regardless of
"numerous and important institutional reforms in the past five years".

The French minister blamed the investment shortfall mainly on a lack of
communication. He proposed to provide "the necessary technical means in
coming months to launch a promotion campaign: the opening of an Internet
web-site, the production of an investment guide and market atlas and a
major campaign in the media and in the marketing network."

"If Africa wants to avoid being sidelined by the modernisation of trade
and exchange, it must give itself modern and dynamic means of
communication," he said.

On Friday night, Brosselin is due to go to an "Africities 98"
exhibition, part of a series of events on African town and community
life. He is expected to emphasise the need for more decentralised
cooperation between France and the continent.
az-mle/fxh/nb/hl

Copyright (c) 1998 Agence France-Presse
Received by NewsEDGE/LAN: 30-01-98 15:08 gmt+2











------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 13:37:46 -0500
From: Solomon Sylva <ssylva@emory.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
Message-ID: <34E09E7A.4A2@emory.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Archi,

Is this crazy or what? Even the Canadian satelites that capture alot of
international soccer events, could not even pull this off. They do show
alot of French football games every week, and I am not sure if Canal
France International is one of them or not.

But I thank you for hint. I will give it a try. Also did found out that
the YAHOO Brothers do update the scores thru the REUTERS fairly quikly.

Oh well, heading back to our satelite room to do more searching. See you
guys are luckier than some of us out here. Hope someone is recording the
games so far.

Cheers
King Solomon






archibald.graham@commit.gm wrote:
>

> Oh dear, sorry about that. What a world we live in with little regard for
> events other than War in this part of the world!!
>
> You can try CFI - Canal France International. Your chances of viewing the
> events with them throughout are high. Otherwise some of us here like
> Tombong Saidy may have to fill you on the events as they unfold.
>
> Regards
> Archi

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 13:37:32 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Thousands flee Freetown fighting
Message-ID: <9802101837.AA32856@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Gambia-Lers,

Have you been keeping up with the war in Freetown? Seems like there has
been fierce fighting going on between the security forces (ECOMOG and CDF)
and the Junta forces (AFPRC/RUF) over the past few days.

It is really sad to note that the OAU and the UN have allowed the war in
this area to degenerate to such a level. A Rwandan and Somalian type
situation seems unevitable if these organisation do not step in to bring
about peace. The security forces have vowed to remove the Junta, at all
cost, this time, in order to satisfy the Conakry accord of restoring
Ousted President Tejan Kabba as the democratically elected leader.

Whether the security forces archieve their goal of restoring Kabba or not,
my question is, couldn't there have been an alternte way of bringing peace
without the massacre of innocent civilians? It is ironic that innocent
civilians would have to die in the process of restoring one man to power.
I guess that's what sacrifice is all about. As someone with relatives in
the region, my heart continues to bleed terribly for all the victims and
those entrapped with a "no way out".

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
****************************************************************************

Thousands flee Freetown fighting

Thousands of people are fleeing eastern Freetown
in Sierra Leone as heavy shelling and fighting
continues between Nigerian troops and forces loyal
to the military regime.

The Nigerians are clashing with the military
government's troops on several fronts in the
outskirts of the city. Dozens of people have been
killed and hundreds wounded in five days of fighting.
Some of the wounded have been taken to hospital in
wheelbarrows.

Since dawn on Tuesday the sound of shelling has
boomed around the hills above the capital and in the
eastern suburbs. Thousands of people have been
moving through the narrow streets of the city trying
to escape the artillery and small arms fire.

The Nigerians say they are determined to flush
out Sierra Leone's military regime, which was
condemned by the international community for
seizing power in a coup last May. The Nigerian
commander, Colonel Maxwell Khobie, said he was
intending to take Freetown on Tuesday.

But forces loyal to the military government are
resisting fiercely. A spokesman for the regime
said the fighting would continue to the end.

---------------------------
Source:
Associated Press

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 14:10:57 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Thousands flee Freetown fighting
Message-ID: <9802101910.AA46854@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Correction....

>
> Gambia-Lers,
>
> Have you been keeping up with the war in Freetown? Seems like there has
> been fierce fighting going on between the security forces (ECOMOG and CDF)
> and the Junta forces (AFPRC/RUF) over the past few days.

The last line should read:
.... and the junta forces (AFRC/RUF) over the past few days.
^^^^^^^^^

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 15:08:26 +0100
From: "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
To: Gambia-L@U.Washington.edu
Subject: France Revises African Relationship. WashPost. 6 Feb 98
Message-ID: <C12565A7.004D7767.00@wfp.org>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii




List manager,
Please forward for infor only. Housainou
---------------------- Forwarded by Housainou Taal/OD/WFP on 10-02-98 15:05
---------------------------

From:

To:
cc:
Subject:



FRENCH FOREIGN POLICY/AFRICA 30 January - 6 February 1998

1. France Revises African Relationship. Washington Post. 6 Feb 98
2. France overhauls aid policy for developing nations. Reuters. 4 Feb
98 [adds different details]
3. Abidjan asks France to clarify African cooperation programme. AFP.
30 Jan 98

****************************************

1. France Revises African Relationship

Reform Plan Abolishes Ministry, Separate Policy for Former Colonies

By Charles Trueheart
Washington Post Foreign Service
Friday, February 6, 1998; Page A40

PARIS, Feb. 5?The government of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin today
outlined a potentially far-reaching reform of France's relationship with
its African "back yard," a sphere of influence dating from the colonial
era that once guaranteed France the support of a major bloc of African
votes at the United Nations.

Since the French colonial empire in Africa gave way to independence
nearly 40 years ago, France has maintained close ties to most of its
former colonies through a de facto ministry for African affairs known as
the Ministry for Cooperation, a powerful agency virtually independent of
the rest of France's diplomatic apparatus.

Over the years, French leaders, beginning with President Charles de
Gaulle in the 1960s, have yearned to drive a stake through the heart of
the Cooperation Ministry. But they have always surrendered to pressures
from the bureaucracy and its constituency -- African leaders who saw the
ministry as their special conduit to political influence and foreign
aid.

The new reform plan reflects France's continuing retrenchment in Africa
as the United States becomes more active there and Paris's desire to
forge economic relationships in English-speaking African countries,
notably South Africa. It represents a new phase in France's efforts to
break out of almost four decades of quasi-colonialism and another step
in the rejiggering of global relationships in the post-Cold War era.

Jospin's eight-month-old Socialist government from the beginning has
signaled its desire to break with past policy toward Africa.

France's military presence on the continent is being cut by one-fourth,
and this month it will participate with the United States and Britain in
training French-speaking African soldiers for peacekeeping operations on
the continent -- a tacit relinquishment of France's exclusive military
domain that would have been unthinkable even five years ago.

Thus far, Jospin's government has worked effectively on the African
dossier with President Jacques Chirac, whose Gaullist party was defeated
in legislative elections last year. Although he swore three years ago on
a visit to Benin that the cherished Cooperation Ministry would exist as
long as he was president, Chirac gave his blessing to the Jospin plan.

The machinery of the reform is bureaucratic: The Cooperation Ministry
will be absorbed into the Foreign Ministry, where, at least in theory,
Africa will be a world region like any other. Charles Josselin, the
incumbent cooperation minister, said France will cease to have a
separate foreign policy for French-speaking African countries.

When the reforms are refined and put in place later this year, Josselin
will become a junior minister under Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine. But
he will keep a place at the cabinet table to reassure African leaders
who fear they will lose their clout and privileged access.

Such are the sensitivities regarding this move that every official
effort has been made to stress that France is not abandoning its special
friends. Because of its high levels of poverty, French-speaking Africa
will continue to constitute a "priority zone of solidarity" for French
development assistance, officials said today.

"No one will lose," Vedrine said at a news conference.

At stake for developing countries is French foreign aid that amounts to
almost $8 billion a year -- on a per capita basis, more than three times
the U.S. foreign aid budget. About two-thirds of it goes to African
countries.

The change also will enable France to act in concert with other donor
nations and organizations, such as the United Nations, the European
Union, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. France's aid
to African nations and others in Asia and the Caribbean has been heavily
redirected in recent years through those organizations, limiting its
direct largess to favored countries.

French officials today spoke of "coherence" as the objective of the
reform, but the relationship between France and Africa will continue to
operate at several levels.

In addition to the newly reconstituted Foreign Ministry, rival centers
of power remain at the presidential palace, which has long regarded
Africa as a special preserve, and at the Finance Ministry, whose power
over foreign aid funds has been enhanced under the new scheme.

? Copyright 1998 The Washington Post Company
____________________________________________

Some added details:

2. France overhauls aid policy for developing nations

By Francois Raitberger

PARIS, Feb 4 (Reuters) - France announced a major overhaul on Wednesday
of aid to developing countries that reflected world economic changes and
a new approach towards its former colonies.

Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin said development aid would remain
focused on Africa and would not shrink, but would be "concentrated on
those countries which most need it".

State aid units, which have often carried out their work shrouded in
secrecy as France clung to a fading aura as an African post-colonial
superpower, will be merged under the foreign ministry into "a large
diplomatic body" to make them more open and efficient.

"Africa has moved. Despite historical handicaps, and such scourges as
AIDS, it now has higher economic growth rates and stronger aspirations
to democracy," Jospin told the National Assembly.

"We had to take this evolution into account," he said.

The reform, announced at a cabinet meeting, is part of wider plans by
Jospin's seven-month-old government to review relations with Africa,
including almost halving French troops which have often acted as
kingmakers there.

The State Secretariat for Cooperation, which has sometimes been dubbed
"ministry of the colonies", will be turned into a ministry under the
direct authority of Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine, with a single
budget for both.

Under plans approved on Wednesday in a cabinet meeting chaired by
President Jacques Chirac, a committee grouping representatives of nine
ministries will aportion aid under finance ministry control.

It will define which countries qualify as members of a "Priority
Solidarity Zone" which will get the bulk of the aid, set to remain at a
total 38 billion francs ($6.3 billion) or 0.45 percent of gross domestic
product.

Jospin said the zone would include all the countries which are now
members of France's Aid and Cooperation Fund -- most of France's former
African colonies, some of the continent's other poorest states as well
as Haiti and Cambodia.

But membership could change in the future as economic conditions evolve.

Government officials said cooperation had to adapt to recent economic
changes, which left some poor countries dependent on foreign state aid
while others could rely more on private investment.

Conservative Gaullist Jacques Baumel, head of the National Assembly
Defence Committee, launched a blistering attack on the reform as
spelling the end of France's traditional links with Africa "at a time
when some countries make no mystery of their determination to edge us
out".

France has suffered recent setbacks in Africa as it backed the
overthrown Hutu government blamed for the genocide in Rwanda, and its
ally, Mobutu Sese Seko, was ousted in Zaire by the Rwanda-backed rebels
of President Laurent Kabila.

"(The reform) will weaken the exceptionally close links between the
continent and our nation by drowning French aid to Africa into the funds
we grant to all kinds of countries in the world," Baumel said.

He said that scrapping the State Secretariat for Cooperation was "a bad
blow to an essential part of Gaullist policy" towards Africa.

Under a practice set under the late president Charles de Gaulle,
France's African policy was often conducted in discreet deals made with
African presidents by secretive French presidential envoys.

Jospin said defence accords with African countries would remain in the
hands of the French defence council that groups the president, the prime
minister and the foreign and defence ministers. France announced last
July it would cut troops in Africa by 40 percent to 5,000 from 8,350.

Copyright (c) 1998 Reuters
Received by NewsEDGE/LAN: 04-02-98 17:31 gmt+2
____________________________________________

3. Abidjan asks France to clarify African cooperation programme

by Adnane Zaka

ABIDJAN, Jan 30 (AFP) - Ivory Coast, once one of France's leading
political and economic partners in Africa, took advantage Friday of a
visit by French junior cooperation minister Charles Josselin to ask for
details of planned reforms.

The French secretary of state for cooperation had talks in the economic
capital Abidjan with Ivorian Minister of Foreign Affairs Amara Essy, who
later said he had asked for clarification of the reforms due early in
February.

The French plan, which has been delayed on several occasions, notably
provides for the merger of the cooperation ministry, considered by many
French-speaking countries as "the African ministry", into the foreign
ministry.

Without going much further, Essy said of he had been told: "It is what
we had expected."

"France is a sovereign country and it is up to us to see where our own
interests lie," Essy added, stressing that "there is no problem between
Ivory Coast and France."

Francophone African leaders of former colonies have shown fears that the
extension by the Socialist Party government in Paris of the foreign
ministry's activities, henceforth expected to deal with nations of the
continent as equal partners, would leave them high and dry and end
long-standing "special relations" with Africa,

On general politics, Essy said he and Josselin had discussed
developments across the continent, notably in the ethnically troubled
Great Lakes region, where Rwanda and Burundi are swept by conflcit
between the mainly Tutsi armies and extremist Hutu rebels, and the
English-speaking countries of Liberia and Sierra Leone, in which Ivory
Coast has major regional interests.

Liberia is emerging from a brutal civil war and Sierra Leone is
currently run by a military junta allied to former rebels, who have
promised to restore power to elected civilian authorities next April.
Fighting continues in Sierra Leone, whose economy has been savaged by
the conflict.

Josselin, who arrived in Abidjan on Thursday evening, was also received
by Ivorian President Henri Konan Bedie and took part in a meeting of a
steering committee on the "Franc Zone initiative for investment" at the
Ivorian headquarters of the Central Bank of West African States.

The Franc Zone groups African nations whose CFA currency is pegged to
the French franc.

Josselin stated that "investment remains insufficient in the zone" in
spite of the 50 percent devaluation of the CFA franc in January 1994,
which took the rate to 100 CFA for one French franc, and regardless of
"numerous and important institutional reforms in the past five years".

The French minister blamed the investment shortfall mainly on a lack of
communication. He proposed to provide "the necessary technical means in
coming months to launch a promotion campaign: the opening of an Internet
web-site, the production of an investment guide and market atlas and a
major campaign in the media and in the marketing network."

"If Africa wants to avoid being sidelined by the modernisation of trade
and exchange, it must give itself modern and dynamic means of
communication," he said.

On Friday night, Brosselin is due to go to an "Africities 98"
exhibition, part of a series of events on African town and community
life. He is expected to emphasise the need for more decentralised
cooperation between France and the continent.
az-mle/fxh/nb/hl

Copyright (c) 1998 Agence France-Presse
Received by NewsEDGE/LAN: 30-01-98 15:08 gmt+2








------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 10:22:28 +1200
From: Thomas Forster <T.Forster@mang.canterbury.ac.nz>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Fighting in Sierra Leone
Message-ID: <7186621F54@mang.canterbury.ac.nz>
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Hi , below is some news from the happenings in S/Leone.
For more details over the events of the past days the site is:
http://www.sierra-leone.org/slnews.html


9 February: Pro-junta forces and ECOMOG battled on at least two fronts to
the south and east of Freetown Monday, while ECOMOG Chief of Staff
Brigadier-General Abdul-Ome Mohammed vowed "utter retaliation" in response
to what he termed an "unprovoked attack" on his troops on Thursday. "They
initiated the attack and we'll carry it to the logical conclusion to ensure vantage
positions where our soldiers would not be attacked," he said. Mohammed said
the clashes started Thursday after an ECOMOG patrol vehicle hit a landmine
in Kissy, then came under "concentrated fire" from junta soldiers and RUF
fighters. "We can't tolerate this unprovoked attack or unnecessary killing of
Nigerians," Mohammed told reporters in Lagos, adding that ECOMOG has
mounted an all-out offensive to overthrow Sierra Leone's military government.
"As I am talking to you our troops are moving. We are not far away from the
city center," Mohammed said. "We're tired of this and want to finish it, as it's
an opportunity to bring some sanity into the system and implement the
Conakry Accord. Our troops have advanced to Wellington, Calabar, Waterloo,
and Bengwema Training Center. These are strategic areas on the outskirts of
Freetown. We are now working hard to capture Kissy, which is the base from
which the junta gets its supplies." A junta spokesman said ECOMOG troops
were meeting stiff opposition in their attempts to enter the capital. "We have
received military intelligence via their radio that they are to enter Freetown
today," the spokesman said. "There is no end in sight to the fighting, as both
sides are determined to come on top." By late Sunday, ECOMOG troops were
reported to have reached Grassfields, about five miles from the city center.
Junta military spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel John Milton acknowledged that
property damage had been considerable, especially in the satellite towns of
Wellington, Kissy, Regent, Rokell, Waterloo, and Devil Hole. Milton denied a
claim by the opposition pro-democracy Radio 98.1, which reported an
ECOMOG advance on Freetown from three fronts. BBC West Africa
correspondent Mark Doyle reported Monday that the Nigerians are approaching
the city from the east and the south, with the key battles being fought to
control the road leading out of Freetown and the hills behind it. "If the Nigerians
succeed in cutting the main roads out of Freetown, they will effectively trap the
military government and half a million people in the Freetown peninsula," Doyle
said. After a morning lull in the fighting, Nigerian ECOMOG troops resumed
long-range artillery bombardments from their base at Lungi International
Airport. Nigerian Alpha jet fighters bombed targets in Freetown, including
Sierra Leone Broadcasting Service's transmitter on Leicester Peak. Staff were
evacuated, and there was no immediate word on casualties or damage. SLBS
radio and television have not been broadcasting since Sunday night. Radio
98.1 reported Sunday that junta soldiers were massing at Fourah Bay College
in preparation for an attack on Gloucester and Regent, as well as Leicester
Peak, all of which are reportedly now under ECOMOG control.

In the first official announcement of casualties for the Sierra Leone side,
Director of Military Health Services Brigadier James Kanu said Monday that 13
soldiers had died since the fighting started on Thursday, and that 109 people
had received shrapnel wounds. "The civilian casualty continues to increase
because of the bombardment by Nigerian ECOMOG Alpha jets," he added.
"The civilian casualties have been very high, especially in the areas which have
been hit by heavy bombardment," military spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel John
Milton told reporters. He gave no figures, but hospital sources say scores of
people have been killed since Thursday. Medical ward officer Sillah Dumbuya
said more than 80 wounded were admitted to Freetown's Wilberforce Military
Hospital, while medical officials said that over 100 others, many of them
civilians, have been admitted to Connaught Hospital. ECOMOG force
commander Major-General Timothy Shelpidi said there were heavy casualties
on the Sierra Leonean side, but put the blame on the junta. "They are not only
losing in terms of men and territory, they are now arming school children," he
said. He accused the junta of killing people whom they accused of taking
sides with ECOMOG. ECOMOG Chief of Staff Brigadier-General Abdul-Ome
Mohammed acknowledged casualties on the ECOMOG side, but gave no
numbers. "There is no doubt that in a war zone there must be casualties," he
said. "There are some wounded and some killed, but I don't have the numbers
yet." The BBC reported Monday that Freetown has become a "dead city."
Schools and shops are closed, food is scarce, and prices have increased
drastically.

ECOMOG force commander Major-General Timothy Shelpidi on Monday
denied claims by the junta to have shot down a Nigerian Alpha fighter plane on
Sunday. "All of my planes and pilots are accounted
for," he said.




------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 16:47:30 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: African Cup of Nations' Results
Message-ID: <68857ca4.34e0cb02@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

There was only one match today and the results are:

Egypt Vs Mozambique 2 - 0


Peace

Tombong

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 17:25:25 -0800
From: "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Can't we just be honest?
Message-ID: <199802102332.RAA03988@mailhost.cyberramp.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Alpha:
I must say what a pleasure it is to catch you on the net.
The last I saw you, since Muslim High, was 1990 on a visit to Gambia. In
1996 I was in Hanover visiting with Samsudeen Colley, In inquiring If there
were any other members of our class in Germany, He acknowledged that you
were around somewhere in the Bremen area. And that Sheriff Manneh(Do you
have any recollection of him?) was also in the Hanover area.
Are you still based in Duechland?
On a different note, I caught your exchange with Bass on the Bantaba. I
noticed that you are not on the same wavelength.
It is quite all right to have diverging views on the issues. I am not sure
if it is prudent to allow your exchanges to escalate to a state of
irritation.
To the extend that Bass is unable to discern the principles of PDOIS(If
this is your view) then, the task is yours to enlighten him on the real
stand of PDOIS.
I think the fundamental purpose of this Bataba is to creat a suitable
medium for the purposes of exchanging ideas, thus providing intellectual
stimulation, meeting and making new friends so on, and soforth. so lets
make it a pleasant experience.
Keep up the good contribution!!
I am glad to be able to say hello. Its been a while.
Morro Krubally
----------
> From: Alpha Robinson <garob1@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Can't we just be honest?
> Date: Tuesday, February 03, 1998 1:57 AM
>
> Bass wrote,
>
> >I find it
> >terribly amusing that you and Mr.Robison tend to think that all those
> >Gambians who disagree with what Pdois have to say do so because they
don't
> >know what Pdois is talking about.But maybe some do precisely because
they
> >know so very well what Pdois is talking about.
>
> Bass I am beggining to get irritated by your capacity to twist around
> facts. I mentioned your lack of knowledge about PDOIS' programme
> simply because it was so obvious that you have not read PDOIS'
> writnings on its economic programme before. Proof of this is found in
> your statement "as a result, the economic
> strategy it is NOW putting forward and confidently portraying as the
> only cure of the economic ailments of our nation". I underline now
> because reading through your writing critically I understood you to
> be saying that PDOIS which is after all a Semi-socialist or socialist
> party which after all is hostile (by default) to market forces, has
> NOW turned around to pretend to us that they are open to private
> ownership. That is just not true, period.
> See the point! For that reason alone have I made my contentions.
> Let me make this clear Bass, I do not at all expect everyone to
> embrace PDOIS' ideas for that would be very naive. What I wish to see
> though is an honest stand on what they say IN PRINCIPLE and not just
> slander and distortions based on one's own imaginations. Any politically
mature person will know that
> people affiliate with parties which either best serve their own
> personal interests or the collective interest of society as they see
> it. Of course
> those who wish to continue to live at the expense of the people,
> those who do not wish to make any sacrifice for the country cannot
> accept PDOIS' programme. On the other hand, those in whose interest
> PDOIS speaks will be more receptive to PDOIS' ideas. I can hear you
> saying, but why are they not in government, that's another matter.
> Once they manage to free themselves from the Shackles of the criminal
> vices of post colonial politics, it will become obvious to a
> farmer that he/she has nothing to gain by enriching a few Gambians at
> his/her own expense. If you ask the farmer with a liberated mind or
> one of those Gambians out in the streets he/she
> will tell you that nothing has changed since independence. Their
> lives remain miserable. The same colanuts they recieved from Jawara
> they recieve from Jammeh today. Such people who have not tasted the
> honeys of independence are logically (once free) bound to think
> different from educated ones like you. You have the chances to live a
> decent life and you do not want to loose those standards which you
> have aquired simply by virtue of your education. See, if you were a
> poor farmer you are bound to react differently to financial
> discipline, for that would have improved your life and give you
> dignity!
>
> So to cut the story short yes, some Gambians do not understand PDOIS'
> programme, some on the other hand disagree with it because it refuses
> them the previledge to live like kings. But in any case we must be
> honest about it and simply disagree in principle, INFORM and EDUCATE the
> Gambian people, those who were less fortunate, those who were
> deliberately and still are deliberately kept ignorant, who should be the
final judges.
> Simple!
>
> much respect,
> Alpha

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 18:11:34 -0500
From: sjennings@gardner-webb.edu (Sharon Jennings)
To: MKCORRA@VM.SC.EDU
Subject: [Fwd: [Fwd: Happy V-Day!]]
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----------------------------Original message----------------------------
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Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 11:42:56 -0500
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Message-ID: <34DF2D7D.1301@gardner-webb.edu>
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 11:23:25 -0500
From: Tammy Hoyle <thoyle@gardner-webb.edu>
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Sending this, not for good luck, but to share a really neat story!!
----------
John Blanchard stood up from the bench, straightened his Army uniform,
and studied the crowd of people making their way through Grand Central
Station. He looked for the girl whose heart he knew, but whose face he
didn't, the girl with the rose. His interest in her had begun thirteen
months before in a Florida library. Taking a book off the shelf he
found himself intrigued, not with the words of the book, but with the
notes penciled in the margin. The soft handwriting reflected a
thoughtful soul and insightful mind. In the front of the book, he
discovered the previous owner's name, Miss Hollis Maynell. With time and
effort he located her address. She lived in New York City. He wrote
her a
letter introducing himself and
inviting her to correspond.

The next day he was shipped overseas for service in World War II.
During the next year and one month the two grew to know each other
through the mail. Each letter was a seed falling on a fertile heart. A
romance was budding. Blanchard requested a photograph, but she refused.

She felt that if he really cared, it wouldn't matter what she looked
like. When the day finally came for him to return from Europe, they
scheduled their first meeting - 7:00 PM at the Grand Central Station in
New York. "You'll recognize me," she wrote, "by the red rose I'll be
wearing on my lapel."

So at 7:00 he was in the station looking for a girl whose heart he
loved, but whose face he'd never seen. I'll let Mr. Blanchard tell you
what happened:

A young woman was coming toward me, her figure long and slim. Her
blonde hair lay back in curls from her delicate ears; her eyes were blue

as flowers. Her lips and chin had a gentle firmness, and in her pale
green suit she was like springtime come alive. I started toward her,
entirely forgetting to notice that she was not wearing a rose. As I
moved, a small, provocative smile curved her lips. "Going my way,
sailor?" she murmured.

Almost uncontrollably I made one step closer to her, and then I saw
Hollis Maynell. She was standing almost directly behind the girl. A
woman well past 40, she had graying hair tucked under a worn hat.. She
was more than plump, her thick-ankled feet thrust into low-heeled
shoes. The girl in the green suit was walking quickly away. I felt as
though I was split in two, so keen was my desire to follow her, and yet
so deep was my longing for the woman whose spirit had truly companioned
me and upheld my own. And there she stood. Her pale, plump face was
gentle and sensible, her gray eyes had a warm and kindly twinkle.

I did not hesitate. My fingers gripped the small worn blue leather copy
of the book that was to identify me to her. This would not be love, but
it
would be something
precious, something perhaps even better than love, a friendship for
which I
had been and
must ever be grateful. I squared my shoulders and saluted and held out
the
book to the woman,
even though while I spoke I felt choked by the bitterness of my
disappointment.

"I'm Lieutenant John Blanchard, and you must be Miss Maynell. I am so
glad you could meet me; may I take you to dinner?" The woman's face
broadened into a tolerant smile. "I don't know what this is about,
son," she answered, "but the young lady in the green suit who just went
by, she begged me to wear this rose on my coat. And she said if you
were to ask me out to dinner, I should go and tell you that she is
waiting for
you
in the big restaurant across the street. She said it was some kind of
test!"

It's not difficult to understand and admire Miss Maynell's wisdom. The
true nature of a heart is seen in its response to the unattractive.
"Tell me whom you love," Houssaye wrote, "And I will tell you who you
are."

Send this to 3 people.... You will have good luck for an entire day.
Send this to 8 people .... You will have good luck for all of next week.
Send this 11 or more people......You will know your true love and be
happy for a long, long time.
Send this to 20 or more people ...... You and your true love are going
to be happily married for ever after.
Send this to nobody...... You will have bad luck for at least 5 years.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 20:05:18 EST
From: JENGFANNEH@aol.com
To: Gambia-L@U.washington.edu
Subject: Poor choice of words
Message-ID: <4b52eb02.34e0f950@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

I will have to admit that the Baboucarr Gaye's ordeal affected me to utilise
poor choice of words, and reading from your respond it has offended you
presonally and unfortunately that was not the intent.
I have gone back and re-read your statement, and to some extent might have
jump the guns, but I will have to say your last statement is an implication of
an opinion. But all the same, I never intended it to be personal, and talking
about Mr.Fall good old days in Kaur brought some good feeling, and I hope that
was the intention.(laugh)....

Mose

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 20:21:23 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: GRA, Univ. of Washington, Seattle (fwd)
Message-ID: <199802110121.UAA20351@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Forwarded message:
> From owner-forgrad-l-outgoing@mtu.edu Tue Feb 10 16:24:45 1998
> X-Received: MTU Resend v1.3 for forgrad-l
> Message-Id: <199802102124.QAA17849@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
> X-Sender: ajlondo@141.219.149.237
> X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Light Version 1.5.2
> Mime-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 16:24:40 -0500
> To: forgrad-l@mtu.edu
> From: "Andrew J. Londo" <ajlondo@mtu.edu>
> Subject: GRA, Univ. of Washington, Seattle
> Cc: forestry-l@mtu.edu
> Precedence: list
>
>
> >Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 12:30:17 -0700
> >Reply-To: robh@u.washington.edu
> >Sender: FORSOILS-owner@u.washington.edu
> >From: Rob Harrison <robh@u.washington.edu>
> >To: "Forest Soils" <forsoils@u.washington.edu>
> >Subject: GRA, Univ. of Washington, Seattle
> >X-To: forsoils <forsoils@u.washington.edu>
> >X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 beta -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
> >
> >Greetings list members,
> >
> >A Graduate Research Assistantship (GRA) is available to a qualified
> >student interested in pursuing a master's or doctoral degree in
> >Quantitative Resources Management within the College of Forest Resources
> >at the University of Washington. The successful candidate will perform
> >research on early growth and development in young, managed stands of
> >Douglas-fir, concentrating on stand dynamics, growth and yield
> >relationships, and population structure relationships. Opportunities
> >for
> >research on other biometrical topics are also available. A strong
> >quantitative background is desired. To be considered for this GRA,
> >students must be admitted (or must be in process of applying) to the
> >University of Washington's Graduate School. For further information
> >about
> >stipend amounts (including tuition waivers) and duration of research
> >assistantship, contact Dr. Eric Turnblom through one of the means
> >provided
> >below.
> >
> >Thanks for your consideration!
> >
> >Eric C. Turnblom, Asst. Prof.----------------------------------------
> >University of Washington ect@u.washington.edu
> >College of Forest Resources
> >232 Bloedel Hall FAX (206) 685-3091
> >BOX 352100
> >Seattle, WA 98195-2100 VOICE (206) 543-2762
> >=====================================================================
> >
> >
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 22:52:03 EST
From: MJagana@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: The Embassy & Other matters
Message-ID: <688649ea.34e12066@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 98-02-08 18:54:30 EST, you write:

<< Some of you may
remembered that before 1994 Gambians did not need visas to visit the United
Kingdom as long as one is staying for less than 90 days and even when visas
were required,

Dear Tombong,

This 90 days policy was under the Commonwealth Nations, which I believe The
Gambia is part of. However during the Prime Minsiter Maraget Thacher, some of
the commonwealths policy agreements where changed.

The UK use this policy agreement to close the loop hole on Gambians. However
other commonwealth conutries are still given the 90 days privilage.


Jagana

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 03:15:05 -0000
From: "archibald.graham@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Wanted urgently: Starker Program
Message-ID: <B0000051882@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Archibald H. R. Graham" <archibald.graham@commit.gm>
via Commit


Does anyone on the list uses Starker program?

I would be grateful to get in contact with anyone who is currently or had
been
previously using Starker (disk compression) Program.

A lead to someone who has got or uses it would also be greatly appreciated.

I had a crash on a computer with a hard disk originally compressed using
Starker without a backup.

I have scouting around for about 2 weeks now for this program but
to no avail so any assistance would be really appreciated.

Looking forward to any assistance.

Regards to all,
Archi

e-mail address:
archibald.graham@commit.gm


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 23:03:19 EST
From: MJagana@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: The Embassy & Other matters
Message-ID: <7539e90d.34e1230b@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 98-02-09 03:40:06 EST, you write:

<< One of the main reasons why I was identified to head this important
> institution was the make it more of a national radio and television and
make
> it accessibly to all Gambians and to serve all political views. From my own
> judgement (I could be wrong) we are now doing that. We are reporting the
views
> of the opposition and other views. We covered PDOIS' congress and we also
> covered a UDP workshop on Youths. Since I came to GRTS, these were the only
> two times that a request for coverage was made by the opposition. >>

Dear Tombong.

Just as suggestion " I hope you are open for Suggestion".

As head of the GRTS why not offer to each political an OPINION TIME. This
could be about five minutes after the news a member of any political party
will be given FIVE MINUTES to view their opinion with no SENSOR on a
particular event that happened over the week or so.

Just a Suggestion.

Jagana

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 23:37:43 -0500
From: M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Wanted urgently: Starker Program
Message-ID: <34E12B16.A35B5D3B@mindspring.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr. Graham,

I have not used the program (I believe you mean Stacker) for quite some time,
because it tended to precipitate some problems. Among other things, Stacking
tends to slow down the access time, which is amplified on larger drives. I
would have to look for the documentation to address your problem (if I can find
it.)

MWP

archibald.graham@commit.gm wrote:

> Sent by "Archibald H. R. Graham" <archibald.graham@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
> Does anyone on the list uses Starker program?
>
> I would be grateful to get in contact with anyone who is currently or had
> been
> previously using Starker (disk compression) Program.
>
> A lead to someone who has got or uses it would also be greatly appreciated.
>
> I had a crash on a computer with a hard disk originally compressed using
> Starker without a backup.
>
> I have scouting around for about 2 weeks now for this program but
> to no avail so any assistance would be really appreciated.
>
> Looking forward to any assistance.
>
> Regards to all,
> Archi
>
> e-mail address:
> archibald.graham@commit.gm




------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 00:30:30 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Artillery Shells Pound Sierra Leone
Message-ID: <9802110530.AA46236@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

They called it "one of the bloodiest days yet". Brothers and
sisters...there is really a fierce battle going on out there,
according to this report.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

************************************************************************
Artillery Shells Pound Sierra
Leone

By Clarence Roy-Macaulay
Associated Press Writer
Tuesday, February 10, 1998; 4:45 p.m. EST

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) -- A West
African intervention force advanced on Sierra
Leone's capital Tuesday while artillery shells
pounded the seaside city, killing civilians and
scattering frightened residents.

Although no casualty figures were available, it was
clearly one of the bloodiest days yet in the
Nigerian-led force's renewed campaign to oust a
coup-installed military regime and restore Sierra
Leone's elected government.

Residents running for shelter said at least a dozen
civilians were killed in shelling. It was unclear who
was firing, but witnesses said it appeared the
intervention force was shelling junta forces.

In New York, the U.N. Security Council called for
an immediate end to the fighting.

Source:
The Associated Press

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 00:52:38 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: The first ugly moment of the Olympics
Message-ID: <9802110552.AA42060@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

They say, "you reap what you sow". I wonder how true that is. Seems to
happen almost always. Maybe, it is always true then (though not
statistically proven by me).

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
******************************************************************

Canadian tests positive for marijuana

NAGANO, Japan - Canadian gold medallist Ross
Rebagliati of Whistler, B.C., has
tested positive for marijuana use, the
International Olympic Committee said tonight.

Richard Pound, IOC vice-president and a Montreal
native, said the snowboarder had
failed both parts of the drug tests medallists go
through at the Olympic Games.

The Canadian Olympic Association says it plans to
mount an appeal to an independent
court of arbitration. That body would have to make
a ruling within 24 hours of the appeal.

A positive drug test, if it stands, would result
in the stripping of the gold medal for the
Canadian.

Source: Unknown

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 16:13:25 +0330
From: "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: CITIZEN FM CLOSED BY THE GOVERNMENT
Message-ID: <19980211060107.AAA27036@kansala.avana.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I quite agree with Ousman Gajigo on this issue..I am about 99% sure that
the main reaon this station was shut down is bcos of the information they
gave out. The NIA; whatever it stands for I believe is denying the people
the freedom to express themselves. Without criticism, I don't see how
anybody can rectify their mistakes. The people must be allowed to say what
they have and feel like saying. Every tom dick and harry works for
NIA..what is this about.
Please help those who are trying to do something for the nation.
Lang Jr.


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 16:29:45 +0330
From: "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Unwarranted Mail
Message-ID: <19980211061337.AAA5305@kansala.avana.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi guys,
I have a couple of suggestions. I would like to ask you guys to please
direct individual mails to whoever they are supposed to go to instead of
sending it to the whole list.Please use the right means of subscribing
people to the list..I would kindly ask the list administrators to send out
a message explaining the procedure. I believe this will eliminate a lot of
unwarranted messages.
Your cooperation in this matter is highly appreciated.
Lang Jr.


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 01:58:52 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Sierra Leone and west Africa
Message-ID: <9802110658.AA31888@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Gambia-Lers,

Please allow me to say that if this message sounds provocative and
unmanneredly, kindly excuse my ignorance, for that is not an intention on
my part.

I forwarded two articles about the situation in Sierra Leone with the hope
that we can engage in dialogue about the state of Sierra Leone (as our
neighbours, brothers and sisters) and the west african region. To
surprise, however, no one seems to talk about it. Even though I will
assume that most of you have acccess to information about the war, I still
feel that we need to exchange our different views on this issue, as we
are, either directly or indirectly, connected to Sierra Leone since it is
also in West africa.

I am surprised that we are not talking about the Sierra Leone war. I am
surprised too that we are very much concerned and has talked about the
showdown between the US and Iraq, but not about the killings and
associated suffering that is going in our own back yards. I am also
surprised that we have not addressed the issue of the fact that a turmoil
(instability) in Sierra Leone is a problem for the whole of West Africa.

If you think that the discussing the "stability of west africa" is worth
your time, then let me say to you "thank you". When I read about what's
happening in/to Sierra Leone, I always fear that the consequences of this
war will have a lasting and devastating influence on the stability of West
Africa. Some rumour I heard is that Charles Taylor of Liberia is siding
with the Junta in Sierra Leone, and has reportedly sent some troops to aid
the falling Junta forces. Now even if the above is untrue, and Kabba gets
reinstated as president, what feelings will he (Kabba) harbour towards
(for) his neighbour, Liberia and Charles Taylor?

I see this as a state of instability in that region of Sierra Leone,
Liberia (and possibly Guinea). We are talking about three major components
of West Africa here. Even if the Nigerian (and other west african) forces,
(ECOMOG) decide to stay, will they be very effective, and how long will
forces remain in effect? Finally, who will be paying for the existence of
the ECOMOG forces, and how long will they maintain the peace? I pray that
it doesn't get too outrageous a condition of degredation. Even if my
prayers were answered, when will Sierra Leone completely recover from the
evils of destruction? And, at what cost?

So please, let's put up a debate on this Sierra Leonean crisis. Remember,
eventhough it is so far way from Gambia, Sierra Leone is still part of
West Africa. Anything that happens there will impact the Gambia in a
negative fashion.

Thank you for your time.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

=======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 10:24:33 -0000
From: "foroyaa@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: ON THE ARREST OF BABOUCARR GAYE AND EBRIMA SILLAH OF CITIZEN FM
Message-ID: <B0000052144@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Foroyaa" <foroyaa@commit.gm>
via Commit


The President of the Republic,
State House,
Marina Parade,
BANJUL


9 February, 1998.


THE WISE ACT ACCORDING TO THE DICTATES OF THE SECOND THOUGHT

Re: On The Closure Of Citizen FM And The Arrest Of Baboucarr Gaye And
Ebrima Sillah

There are three approaches to a problem. One is to shy away and grumble in
safe corners. The other is to ignore it as if it does not exist, and the
third is to face it and take part in solving it. The latter is the
objective of this letter.

You would agree with us that it is usually an act of great folly to act in
accordance with the dictates of the first flash in the mind. First
impression usually speaks the language of the heart. The wise listen to the
language of the second thought and act according to its dictates. We hope
these words would prove instructive.

Mr President, this letter should have been addressed to the Secretary of
State for Works, Communication and Information. However, when the crisis
broke out on Thursday, 5 February, 1998 we tried to get in touch with the
Secretary of State and discovered that he has travelled. We tried to get in
touch with the Secretary General, Office of the President, to find out who
was acting in the place of the Secretary of State, but he was at a meeting.
We, therefore, contacted other authorities to ring the alarm bell which is
an important crisis or tension prevention and management strategy in a
country where leaders respect and are open to public opinion.

Since the Secretary of State has not been at his desk up to the time of
drafting this letter, it was conceived appropriate to address this letter
to you so that it may be an ingredient for strategic thinking on how to
handle a simple matter which can become complex by wrong handling.

Mr President, all those who exercise direction and control over the affairs
of the state have sworn and have been heard swearing to do right to all
manner of people without fear or favour, affection or ill-will. This
accords with the principle of impartial justice. It affirms that a person
who is to decide the faith of others must fight his or her own human
frailties which may tend to push him or her to act because of fear,
favouritism, affection or ill-will. A leader of people must rely on second
thought and the principle of impartial judgment to decide the faith of
those placed under their jurisdiction. A leader who cannot abide by the
fairness principle cannot possibly ensure the proper administration of a
state on the basis of justice.

Before leaping into the heart of what is of major concern not only to us
but to many of our compatriots here and abroad, as you may have gathered
from the e-mail, if you are really monitoring public opinion, it is
necessary to make certain things abundantly clear.

We do not see this matter as a partisan one. We are not out to appear as
the defender of Citizen FM or score political points. We are sure that all
of us have now realised that Citizen FM has become a very independent media
establishment. The interview with Mr Ousainou Darboe when he came from his
foreign tour; the interview with Mr Hamat Bah after his provincial tour,
and the interview with Halifa Sallah after a letter was addressed to
Secretary of State Dominic Mendy confirm that no political party can use
the station as a propaganda tool. Those who sit on the hot stool and
questioned by the Citizen FM staff know that one has to have something to
say to come out without one's integrity being questioned.

We do not expect that this letter will make Citizen FM less vigorous in the
scrutinization of whatever we say in the future. In fact, the Gambian media
so overwhelmed the US Ambassador to the UN, during his press conference,
that he could not avoid saying "you have a free press".

In deed! In deed! a free press is one which asserts its objectivity in
searching for the truth in spite of whether it is tolerated by the power
that be or not. All democratic governments learn to ensure decency in
journalism by exercising the right to reply.

Of course, just as one does not have a perfect legislature, judiciary and
executive, one should not expect to have a perfect media. All
professionals, irrespective of their works of life, may behave responsibly
or irresponsibly. What is, therefore, important is for the aggrieved to
have the right to redress via the right to reply or through court action
according to the dictates of laws which are reasonably justifiable in a
democratic society. We ourselves have utilised this right to reply very
recently when allegations were made by a politician through the Daily
Observer and was broadcast over Citizen FM. This right to reply was also
exercised by the Secretary of State for Interior in connection with
allegations of torture of the UDP Candidate for Kombo South. We are sure
that each political party has had something said by one media or the other
that it does not agree with, but then there must be tolerance.

As far as we are concerned, the independent media and the executive are
like the teeth and the tongue. If both act in the public interest they will
operate independently but in harmony to enhance development. If there are
shortcomings, there will be tensions without one being able to get rid of
the other. Tolerance is the key.

In short, there was a day, during the transition period, when all
newspaper editors were taken to court and no private owned newspaper found
itself in the streets. How did it appear to you?

Allow us to paint the picture this way. Suppose all the pens in a country
were broken; all the books torn; all the computers crushed; all the radio
stations closed; all the ears plugged; all the eyes closed; all the mouths
sealed, except for occasional right to eat food to survive, what would be
the state of affair? We would all live in a world of silence and emptiness
in misery. No country can have integrity where people do not have the right
to express their views freely and be restrained so as to do so responsibly
by just laws administered by independent and impartial courts.

Pardon us for the long preamble which is designed to draw valuable lessons
just to help the mind and heart to be more fertile to envelope what is to
follow.

Mr President, the delivery of impartial justice may be fettered by the
commission or omission of an act. This is why those who act on behalf of
the state should have their actions grounded on what is legally provided.
You would agree with us that the media should not act as a prosecutor and
judge, and the executive also should not act as a prosecutor and judge.

Hence, when there is reason to believe that any media practitioner has
violated the law, he or she should be taken to a police station and told
the offence he or she is suspected to have committed, charged and then
taken before a court for hearing. This is a simple process which does not
require any alarm.

What we cannot comprehend is why the arrest of baboucarr gaye was done by
the National Intelligence Agency (NIA) and not the police and why he was
detained at the NIA headquarters in ex-communicado, instead of being taken
to police headquarters. It is important for you to know that his wife was
going through emotional strain when we spoke to her after she tried to take
lunch to his husband on Thursday 5 February, 1998 without being able to
trace him. No one could know the place of detention of Mr Gaye and Ebrima
Sillah at that time as if they were security threats. This, Mr President,
leads to psychological torture for a wife, children and loved ones. It was
not until Friday, 6 February, 1998 that the wife could see her husband
when they escorted him to Citizen FM to pick up some documents.

On that same day, armed paramilitary troops were brought to take over the
radio station. The workers were sent away and the station occupied as if
the country was in a state of war.

Mr President, we were monitoring Citizen FM on Friday. All of a sudden the
Focus on Africa programme went to an abrupt halt. After sometime, strange
programmes in a different language could be received, then a BBC programme
came on again.

Bear in mind that the station does not only broadcast news; it broadcasts
social and religious programmes on Fridays. You may wish to imagine the
number of people who cannot tune and get BBC and who rely on Citizen FM for
international news.

We tried to call the station, but the phone kept ringing. No one took it.
Can you imagine the psychological state one is put in to have a phone
ringing without any answer.

Mr Sam Sarr went to the station and found it occupied. No one was allowed
in. The people in the neighbourhood were peeping to know what was
happening. Sam Sarr tried to talk to some of them, but they would not
entertain discussion about what they saw.

Mr President, many people tried to bail Baboucarr Gaye and Ebrima Sillah on
Saturday. Ebrima Sillah was granted bail, but Baboucarr, for some strange
reasons, continued to be in detention until Monday morning, 9 February,
1998, exceeding the seventy-two hours limit established by the
Constitution.

We hope, Mr President, that you will have reporters who will go about to
find out what the public opinion is on the closure of Citizen FM. We can
assure you that it has not put your government in a favourable light.

Clearly, what your government hopes to achieve by the measures used does
not permit easy comprehension. If the action was meant to combat what it
deems to be irresponsible journalism, one must say that the measures can
scarcely be judged prudent. The disadvantages of the action far outweigh
the advantages, if there are any. The reason of this is simple.

Gambians are becoming a very constitutional people.

Section 19 of the constitution states categorically that:

"(1) Every person shall have the right to liberty and security of person.
No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest or detention. No one shall be
deprived of his or her liberty except on such grounds and in accordance
with such procedures as are established by law.

"(2) Any person who is arrested or detained shall be informed as soon as is
reasonably practicable and in any case within three hours, in a language
that he or she understands, of the reasons for his or her arrest or
detention and of his or her right to consult a legal practitioner.

"(3) Any person who is arrested or detained -

"(a) for the purpose of bringing him or her before a court in execution of
the order of a court; or

"(b) upon reasonable suspicion of his or her having committed, or being
about to commit, a criminal offence under the law of The Gambia,

"and who is not released, shall be brought without undue delay before a
court and, in any event, within seventy-two hours.

"(4) Where any person is brought before a court in execution of the order
of a court in any proceedings or upon suspicion of his or her having
committed or being about to commit an offence, he or she shall not
thereafter be further held in custody in connection with those proceedings
or that offence save upon the order of a court.

"(5) If any person arrested or detained as mentioned in subsection (3) (b)
is not tried within a reasonable time, then without prejudice to any
further proceedings which may be brought against him or her, he or she
shall be released either unconditionally or upon reasonable conditions,
including, in particular, such conditions as are reasonably necessary to
ensure that he or she appears at a later date for trial or proceedings
preliminary to trial.

"(6) Any person who is unlawfully arrested or detained by any other person
shall be entitled to compensation from that other person or from any other
person or authority on whose behalf that other person was acting."

The mind of the constitution is clear. No one can be held in ex-communicado
for more than three hours. Within three hours after one's arrest one's
legal counsel should be able to know where one is detained.

Furthermore, one cannot be detained for more than seventy-two hours
without being taken before a court.

Mr President, any attempt to utilise psychological warfare to counter what
may be deemed to be irresponsible journalism is counter productive. A
security officer cannot use torture without violating the law. One cannot
use long detention without violating the law. Hence, any attempt to
utilise strong arm measures simply leads a government to forfeit a lawful
image. Such measures are therefore practically, legally and morally
indefensible.

It is our view that the government should adopt it as a policy to exercise
the right to reply to counter anything it deems incorrect in newspapers or
as broadcast by the electronic media and pursue the due process of law
where it believes the laws have been violated. This is the limit of its
powers. A step beyond this bound is to move into abuse of authority and
illegality.

Suffice it to say, a government which goes beyond the law to ensure
compliance with the law cannot be said to have moral authority to safeguard
the law. Such a government puts the viability of its integrity into
question.

It is hoped that your mind, as President, shall be the depository of the
ideas regarding governance that are entrenched in the constitution and thus
enable your government to enforce and defend the law within the law and
thus avert miscarriage of justice.

This is what is demanded by the situation. We hope all of us will be able
to learn from the development and help Gambia to have a responsible
government and a responsible media and thus make us an enlightened people
living in liberty and dignity rather than dafts living under tyranny.

While anticipating that you will accord this concerns your consideration,
we remain,


Yours,



...........................................
Halifa Sallah
For: The Editorial Board.


cc: Secretary of State for Works, Communication and Information,
Attorney General,
Chief Justice,
The Media.


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 07:39:46 -0800
From: "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Sierra Leone and west Africa
Message-ID: <199802111400.IAA19608@mailhost.cyberramp.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Moses:
I can only suspect the lack of response or the seeming lack of interest in
the Sierra Leone issue, is not out of indifference to their plight, but
perhaps one of lack of information. In contrast to Iraq, the Sierra Leone
issue has been only scantly reported by the U.S. media. To find information
about issues unrelated to the Western hemisphere, one, more often than not,
needs to have a vested interest in order to find news on regions outside.
CNN is notably,and reputably the source we have all come to rely on for
international news. But even CNN report on the said issue has been
relatively scanty. I am not sure if the European media has had what one
might deem a significant coverage either.
I might be incline to feel perhaps that the Sierra Leone and regional
issues might have received a better coverage had there not been a midia
frenzy about the Manaca luwinsky fiasco. To a large extend, the Iraq/ US
standoff has casted an indomitable cloud over the equally important global
issues.
So Moses the story would have been different, had the media kept the
people abreast of the development in that part of the globe.
And finally, I join in prayers that the problem will not escalate into an
other catastrophic civil war.
Good day.
Morro Krubally

----------
> From: Modou Jallow <mjallow@st6000.sct.edu>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Sierra Leone and west Africa
> Date: Tuesday, February 10, 1998 10:58 PM
>
> Gambia-Lers,
>
> Please allow me to say that if this message sounds provocative and
> unmanneredly, kindly excuse my ignorance, for that is not an intention on
> my part.
>
> I forwarded two articles about the situation in Sierra Leone with the
hope
> that we can engage in dialogue about the state of Sierra Leone (as our
> neighbours, brothers and sisters) and the west african region. To
> surprise, however, no one seems to talk about it. Even though I will
> assume that most of you have acccess to information about the war, I
still
> feel that we need to exchange our different views on this issue, as we
> are, either directly or indirectly, connected to Sierra Leone since it is
> also in West africa.
>
> I am surprised that we are not talking about the Sierra Leone war. I am
> surprised too that we are very much concerned and has talked about the
> showdown between the US and Iraq, but not about the killings and
> associated suffering that is going in our own back yards. I am also
> surprised that we have not addressed the issue of the fact that a turmoil
> (instability) in Sierra Leone is a problem for the whole of West Africa.
>
> If you think that the discussing the "stability of west africa" is worth
> your time, then let me say to you "thank you". When I read about what's
> happening in/to Sierra Leone, I always fear that the consequences of this
> war will have a lasting and devastating influence on the stability of
West
> Africa. Some rumour I heard is that Charles Taylor of Liberia is siding
> with the Junta in Sierra Leone, and has reportedly sent some troops to
aid
> the falling Junta forces. Now even if the above is untrue, and Kabba gets
> reinstated as president, what feelings will he (Kabba) harbour towards
> (for) his neighbour, Liberia and Charles Taylor?
>
> I see this as a state of instability in that region of Sierra Leone,
> Liberia (and possibly Guinea). We are talking about three major
components
> of West Africa here. Even if the Nigerian (and other west african)
forces,
> (ECOMOG) decide to stay, will they be very effective, and how long will
> forces remain in effect? Finally, who will be paying for the existence of
> the ECOMOG forces, and how long will they maintain the peace? I pray that
> it doesn't get too outrageous a condition of degredation. Even if my
> prayers were answered, when will Sierra Leone completely recover from the
> evils of destruction? And, at what cost?
>
> So please, let's put up a debate on this Sierra Leonean crisis. Remember,
> eventhough it is so far way from Gambia, Sierra Leone is still part of
> West Africa. Anything that happens there will impact the Gambia in a
> negative fashion.
>
> Thank you for your time.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> =======================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 08:01:32 -0800
From: "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Unwarranted Mail
Message-ID: <199802111400.IAA19618@mailhost.cyberramp.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Lang:
Your suggestion of directing personal Email to the intended party cannot be
said any better. this suggestion is long overdue. Some of the Email I've
come across are abundantly unimportant to the Bantaba; they are personal
and should have been directed to the intended recipient. Some of the mails
are sent in duplicates and even in multiples of the same message. By not
staying inacordance with the intended purpose of this forum, we are taking
away from its importance. Often It takes me considerable length of time to
combat the barrage of email to delete those I find in duplicates and
personal. this could lead to a possible negative impact on the Bantaba,
hence reduction of listed membership.
I hope the list managers will take note.
Good day,
Morro Krubally

----------
> From: malang maane <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Unwarranted Mail
> Date: Tuesday, February 10, 1998 4:59 AM
>
> Hi guys,
> I have a couple of suggestions. I would like to ask you guys to please
> direct individual mails to whoever they are supposed to go to instead of
> sending it to the whole list.Please use the right means of subscribing
> people to the list..I would kindly ask the list administrators to send
out
> a message explaining the procedure. I believe this will eliminate a lot
of
> unwarranted messages.
> Your cooperation in this matter is highly appreciated.
> Lang Jr.
>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 17:24:04 +0100
From: "Housainou Taal" <Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
Message-ID: <C12565A8.005406B3.00@wfp.org>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii




Gambia-L and Moe,

Your info. on Sierra Leone is well appreciated and silence does not mean
lack of concern. In fact I was very keen to contribute to the debate on the
Gambian economy but time! time! time! I will not give up though and will
surely respond. I think, the debate on the Gambian economy could be looked
at from both the global context and from the need to deepen it much further
in the Gambian context. Anyway, let's get back to S/Leone. I think the
tragedy there is very sad and reflects the current dilema in African
politics. Should Kabah be back and at what cost? How does it relate to
other countries such as Congo where Ngessou also seized power recently. We
can understand the Zaire situation when Kabila also marched to Kinshasha.
All these developments tend to set a precedence. The main question is, when
will military coups end in Africa? In Latin America of the 1960s, for
example, a coup was announced often so frequently but one rarely hears of
coups in that region nowadays. Some Latin American and Asian countries may
have survived the Coup disease? although some of those countries still have
problems of geniune democratization.

What are the answers then? I think the answers must come from Africans
ourselves especially at the regional and at the levels of OAU etc. OAU
must be adequately equipped to deal with such issues but there is always
the dilemma of the right to intervene issue. Most coups centre around
corruption although in the S/Leone case, Kabah was hardly in power before
he was overthrowened. Ofcourse, in Sierra Leone, we also know there are
still substantial diamond deposits which inevitably attracts a lot of
vested interests. May be some day a convention could be organised in Africa
on corruption and military coups where our leaders would make declarations
and say no to both corruption and future coups. The people must them ensure
that they keep their word. The UN could assist but ofcourse, we all know
the limits of the UN particulary in light of the New International Economic
Order and the continous decline in UN resources for development issues. It
is much too easy these days for UN organisations to get resources for
"?mergencies" (e,g. assisting refugees, drought victims etc) but
development assistance is almost becoming a taboo. Yet ironically,
development is what should bring about an assault on those underlying
problems that cause poverty and affect our livelihood. I wish to go on but
I must quit now, let me leave you with a poem I wrote as a frustrated
African during the Rwandan crises:


IN THE BELLY OF THE BEAST

Where am I in this dark early morning? I feel I am somewhere very dark,
cold and HOT. Yes, cold, hot, but so much else. I can't illuminate this
dark room but I can feel the energy, the potential, the magic, the
mischief, the canine of the dogs, and everything.

Perhaps I am in the belly of the beast, perhaps I am in Africa.
But what beast?, What Africa? Can I smell anything?
I am blind yet I can feel the outcry of the destitute, the humiliated, the
defeated and even the dead
in their shallow graves.
But what about the innocent? What about women and children?
What about the truth, or is it all virtues and vanity?

Perhaps I am in the belly of the beast. Perhaps I am in Africa.
I know I am blind but I smell the outcry of the innocent, the silent and
explicit of violence of former friends
and neighbours for the sake of land and power. The politicians are
laughing, some are shocked at the
horror, terror and error of human massacre and torture. But what am I? I
know I am blind but is that all?

Perhaps I am in the belly of the beast. Perhaps I am in Africa.
Africa, where civil strife is coating the belly of the beast. Is it
opportunism that yields torture, anger, and death?
Or is it the way we simply are? I am blind but I feel human love even out
of the naked, the battered housewife,
the limbless war veteran, and even the butcher. May be we are something but
shame punishes our emotions
and conscience. The excuse that other creatures are feeding the belly is
getting thinner. Love, dignity and
respect for all is the only cure for my blindness.

By Housainou Taal
Khartoum, 19 July 1994

Poem written as tribute to the massacred victims in Africa, especially the
victims of ethnic fighting in Rwanda.


Regards, Housainou.







mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow) on 11-02-98 07:58:52

Please respond to gambia-l@u.washington.edu

To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List"
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
cc: (bcc: Housainou Taal/OD/WFP)
Subject: Sierra Leone and west Africa




Gambia-Lers,
Please allow me to say that if this message sounds provocative and
unmanneredly, kindly excuse my ignorance, for that is not an intention on
my part.
I forwarded two articles about the situation in Sierra Leone with the hope
that we can engage in dialogue about the state of Sierra Leone (as our
neighbours, brothers and sisters) and the west african region. To
surprise, however, no one seems to talk about it. Even though I will
assume that most of you have acccess to information about the war, I still
feel that we need to exchange our different views on this issue, as we
are, either directly or indirectly, connected to Sierra Leone since it is
also in West africa.
I am surprised that we are not talking about the Sierra Leone war. I am
surprised too that we are very much concerned and has talked about the
showdown between the US and Iraq, but not about the killings and
associated suffering that is going in our own back yards. I am also
surprised that we have not addressed the issue of the fact that a turmoil
(instability) in Sierra Leone is a problem for the whole of West Africa.
If you think that the discussing the "stability of west africa" is worth
your time, then let me say to you "thank you". When I read about what's
happening in/to Sierra Leone, I always fear that the consequences of this
war will have a lasting and devastating influence on the stability of West
Africa. Some rumour I heard is that Charles Taylor of Liberia is siding
with the Junta in Sierra Leone, and has reportedly sent some troops to aid
the falling Junta forces. Now even if the above is untrue, and Kabba gets
reinstated as president, what feelings will he (Kabba) harbour towards
(for) his neighbour, Liberia and Charles Taylor?
I see this as a state of instability in that region of Sierra Leone,
Liberia (and possibly Guinea). We are talking about three major components
of West Africa here. Even if the Nigerian (and other west african) forces,
(ECOMOG) decide to stay, will they be very effective, and how long will
forces remain in effect? Finally, who will be paying for the existence of
the ECOMOG forces, and how long will they maintain the peace? I pray that
it doesn't get too outrageous a condition of degredation. Even if my
prayers were answered, when will Sierra Leone completely recover from the
evils of destruction? And, at what cost?
So please, let's put up a debate on this Sierra Leonean crisis. Remember,
eventhough it is so far way from Gambia, Sierra Leone is still part of
West Africa. Anything that happens there will impact the Gambia in a
negative fashion.
Thank you for your time.
Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
=======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------







------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 11:53:26 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Wanted urgently: Starker Program
Message-ID: <9802111653.AA56410@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

> Sent by "Archibald H. R. Graham" <archibald.graham@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
>
> Does anyone on the list uses Starker program?

Do you mean STACKER instead Starker? If so, let me know.


Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
====================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 10:31:49 -0800 (PST)
From: Sarian Loum <Sarian.Loum@Corp.Sun.COM>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Unwarranted Mail
Message-ID: <libSDtMail.9802111031.3205.sarian@groucho>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-MD5: OB9wnCglL0NoyMH99n1YPA==

Gambia-L,

This issue of personal mails being directed to the entire list has been
addressed over and over again. Please send private mails to the individuals
intended for and not to the entire list. If one needs to find out private mail
accounts please direct your request to any of the list managers and we'll be
more than happy to be of service. Your cooperation in this matter is and will
be greatly appreciated. Here are the list owners/managers addresses that you
can send your requests to:

List Owners
Abdou Touray at137@columbia.edu
Katim S. Touray dekat@itis.com
Tony Loum sambabalangarr@classic.msn.com

List Managers
Amadou Janneh amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net
latjor ndow latjor@hotmail.com
Momodou Camara momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk
Sarian Loum sarian.loum@corp.sun.com

kind regards,

sarian


> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 16:29:45 +0330
> From: "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
> To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List"
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Unwarranted Mail
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> X-To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
> X-Priority: 3
> X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 beta -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
>
> Hi guys,
> I have a couple of suggestions. I would like to ask you guys to please
> direct individual mails to whoever they are supposed to go to instead of
> sending it to the whole list.Please use the right means of subscribing
> people to the list..I would kindly ask the list administrators to send out
> a message explaining the procedure. I believe this will eliminate a lot of
> unwarranted messages.
> Your cooperation in this matter is highly appreciated.
> Lang Jr.
>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 19:48:27 +2000
From: mmjeng@image.dk
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Sierra Leone and west Africa
Message-ID: <199802111851.TAA26578@mail.image.dk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Gambia-Lers,
It is sad that the Nigerian-Led ECOMOG pound Freetown with artillery
shells and nobody knows the exact number of death toll. It must be
very serious. There was a report that about 50 people
trying to escape to neighboring Guinea drowned when their boat
capsized
Does it mean that if there is any coup again in
West Africa Nigeria will do the same.
Where is the OAU and what are they doing.
Where is the African Ladies Mission On Peace And Humanitarian Issues.
I am sure they have something to tell their husbands.
How does President Kabbah feel about the pounding of his country and
people, the thoundands of civilians fleeing, the unknown death toll
and those trap in the city. All for him one person to be back to
rule.
Is Abacha democratic enough to led ECOMAG to restore democracy
in Sierre Leone.
Lets pray for our people in Sierre Leone and may God rescue them
immediately.
Greetings
Matarr M. Jeng

P/S Housainou, Your poem is just but great. Keep it up.








------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 14:28:04 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
Message-ID: <9802111928.AA54416@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Housainou Taal, you wrote:
>
> Gambia-L and Moe,
>
> Your info. on Sierra Leone is well appreciated and silence does not mean
> lack of concern.
>
> [...]
>
> Some Latin American and Asian countries may
> have survived the Coup disease? although some of those countries still have
> problems of geniune democratization.

Thank you very much for your response. You brought up a very good point
about the eradication of coups in Latin America. Perhaps, what Africans
need to do is to study and understand the history behind such an
accomplishment by Latin American countries. Without a solution to end
repetitive coups on our continent, Africa and Africans may as well be
doomed forever. Let's continue to keep hope alive.

>
> IN THE BELLY OF THE BEAST
>
> Where am I in this dark early morning? I feel I am somewhere very dark,
> cold and HOT. Yes, cold, hot, but so much else. I can't illuminate this
> dark room but I can feel the energy, the potential, the magic, the
> mischief, the canine of the dogs, and everything.

Your poem was wonderfully done! It was a great read!

Thank you for sharing it.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------




------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 15:27:19 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
Message-ID: <199802112027.PAA27949@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Moe and others,

Personally I believe that Africa will have a few more of Sierra Leone before we can
call ourselves survivors of the Coup disease. I say this for one resaon that is
dictators, corrupt leaders like the Mobutus and their adversaries, Warlord and Coup leaders
all survive in societies with the majority uneducated, underfed, underemployed poor with a minority
elites and no middleclass. Unfortunately the only way to lead such a weird group is to use the
carrot and stick policy. The carrot for the poor and the stick for the few elites. sadly this
does works well to bring changes, but does not serve to ensure longevity of regimes.

To be free from the Coup disease we must pass through the long route of making people read and
write to create more skeptics. The more skeptics the more difficult for a bunch of hooligans to
hooligans to ransack our countries coffers in hte name of bringing what???

It is a catch 22 situation. You make people read and write you close all cheap entrants to the seat
of power you leave them illiterate the doors for every Samba Lamin and Pateh remain open.

> Housainou Taal, you wrote:
> >
> > Gambia-L and Moe,
> >
> > Your info. on Sierra Leone is well appreciated and silence does not mean
> > lack of concern.
> >
> > [...]
> >
> > Some Latin American and Asian countries may
> > have survived the Coup disease? although some of those countries still have
> > problems of geniune democratization.
>
> Thank you very much for your response. You brought up a very good point
> about the eradication of coups in Latin America. Perhaps, what Africans
> need to do is to study and understand the history behind such an
> accomplishment by Latin American countries. Without a solution to end
> repetitive coups on our continent, Africa and Africans may as well be
> doomed forever. Let's continue to keep hope alive.
>
> >
> > IN THE BELLY OF THE BEAST
> >
> > Where am I in this dark early morning? I feel I am somewhere very dark,
> > cold and HOT. Yes, cold, hot, but so much else. I can't illuminate this
> > dark room but I can feel the energy, the potential, the magic, the
> > mischief, the canine of the dogs, and everything.
>
> Your poem was wonderfully done! It was a great read!
>
> Thank you for sharing it.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
> ======================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 21:21:00 (GMT)
From: h.pflueger@gam-line.win.net (H Pflueger)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE:Neo-Nazi/"WhitePower"
Message-ID: <39400969@gam-line.win.net>



Greetings:

I think you might be interested in the following forwarded message:


------------------------------------

>Please give this
>message your attention. IMPORTANT!!!!! Ultra rightwing (Nazi) groups
>once again are trying to establish a Usenet discussiongroup on
>internet under the name "white power". It is of great *importance*
>that these groups are not allowed any more helpin organizing their
>mission of hatred. However *YOU* Take part in the job of stopping
>this discussion/ newsgroup from being established. Before such a
>group can establish itself on the Usenet, there will have to be an
>electronic poll, and then it will be important with as many no-votes
>as possible. Anyone with an email address can take part in the ballot
>VOTE ONLY ONCE - OTHERWISE THE VOTE WILL BE DECLARED NON_VIABLE!!!
>
>The discussiongroup's name is: rec.music.white-power
>THIS IS WHAT YOU MUST DO:
>
>1. Send this message to everyone you know whom has an email address,
>so that they can also vote.
>
>2. Send an email to the following address:
>music-vote@sub-rosa.com
>Write nothing under "subject", but send the following message:
>
>I vote NO on rec.music.white-power
>
>BECAUSE THE VOTES ARE COUNTED AUTOMATICALLY IT IS IMPORTANT THAT
>YOU FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS EXACTLY: SO USE ONLY THE ABOVE EMAIL
>ADDRESS AND NOTE YOUR VOTE ONLY IN THE MESSAGE FIELD ITSELF. NOTHING
>ELSE, NOT EVEN YOUR NAME!
>
>AND: REMEMBER TO SEND THIS MESSAGE FORWARD TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW!!! --
> ( O O)
>-ooO--(_)--Ooo----------------------------
>Dieter Kirchner
>dieter@roko.goe.net
>
>
>
>
>-----------This message was brought to you by--------------
>Informationszentrum fuer Rassismusforschung / D.I.R. e.V.
>Postfach 1221, 35002 Marburg, http://www.uni-marburg.de/dir
>Listserver: dir-ml-request@lists.uni-marburg.de (subscribe)
> Tel:06421-37722 FAX 06421-37794
>
>



* PowerEdit 2.5 I believe in The Divine Right of SysOps.

Go to Top of Page

Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

Posted - 10 Sep 2021 :  17:23:01  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 19:27:59 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: ON THE ARREST OF BABOUCARR GAYE AND EBRIMA SILLAH OF CITIZEN FM
Message-ID: <199802120028.TAA01554@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Let me thank Halifa and his group at Foroyaa for their article. If anything it is very educative
and I hope the authorities fine courage to read it.

Some years ago when I was a midlevel Civil Servant the famous 8-9 category, I attended a
management workshop at MDI. At the close of the two week coffee and tea we had a review meeting
and many were asked for feedbacks and recommendations. One notable on the list compiled was to
encourage the President and Cabinet Ministers to regularly attend such program. I
still find that arguement very valid. As much as I do not believe that our leaders should be
bookworms and nerds to run the state of affairs of our country, I think they need some common
sense education to make politics work for the better. Since they are reluctant to receive such
basic training in management, perhaps we should pray that they have the courage to read this
article.

In the mean time I would use the now famous phrase on the list. Keep up the good work down
there!

malanding jaiteh


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 03:31:35 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: The Embassy & Other matters
Message-ID: <da83c9d5.34e2b369@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit


Jagana,

It is a good suggestion and i will definitely look into it. I am sure it would
be interesting.

PEACE

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 03:42:31 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: AFRICAN CUP OF NATIONS
Message-ID: <688b06d6.34e2b5f9@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

The results of Wednesday's matches are:

Cameroon Vs Guinea 2 - 2
South Africa Vs Cote d'Ivoire 1 - 1
Burkina Vs Algeria 1 - 0

Peace

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 10:33:42 +0100 (MET)
From: Olafiaklinikken Olafia <olafia@online.no>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: UNSUBSCRIBE GAMBIA-L
Message-ID: <199802120933.KAA26243@online.no>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi, PLEASE remove the address <olafia@online.no> from your mailing list!

UNSUBSCRIBE GAMBIA-L


Olafia


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 07:54:24 PST
From: "Babou Njie" <babounjie@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: MRC
Message-ID: <19980212155424.13430.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain




Hi fellow member,
I'm very skeptic about the MRS's function
in the gambia,and i've heard people saying that their
resarchies are done on Gambians but anyway that's a hear say story.
I'ill be greateful if any can say more about their juty in the gambia.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 12:18:42 -0800 (PST)
From: lamin marenah <keita@rocketmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: MRC
Message-ID: <19980212201842.11158.rocketmail@web1.rocketmail.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii


Mr njie,
With all due respect your concerns are
really warranted which unfortunately i don't have an
answer to but i do know that its one of the leading,
if not the leader of public health service in the
gambia.Especially the majority poor and under
priviledged.
It's also an excellent source in
recruiting hard working healthcare
professionals.Despite all merits i am certainly
concern about your scrutiny.Would be intersted in
info as to the validity of your concern.
thanx

Lamin Marenah





---Babou Njie wrote:
>
>
>
>
> Hi fellow member,
> I'm very skeptic about the
MRS's function
> in the gambia,and i've heard people saying
that their
> resarchies are done on Gambians but anyway that's a
hear say story.
> I'ill be greateful if any can say more about their
juty in the gambia.
>
>
______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at
http://www.hotmail.com
>


_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 19:12:37 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: h.pflueger@gam-line.win.net
Cc: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Neo-Nazi/"WhitePower"
Message-ID: <199802130012.TAA16339@willow.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

I hope I am not wasting my time and net space to respond to this but what is
the big deal if a bunch of neo-what nots want to establish a usenet group.
This is a free world. Let them vent whatever they have in their sack!

Peace malanding jaiteh
>
>
> Greetings:
>
> I think you might be interested in the following forwarded message:
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> >Please give this
> >message your attention. IMPORTANT!!!!! Ultra rightwing (Nazi) groups
> >once again are trying to establish a Usenet discussiongroup on
> >internet under the name "white power". It is of great *importance*
> >that these groups are not allowed any more helpin organizing their
> >mission of hatred. However *YOU* Take part in the job of stopping
> >this discussion/ newsgroup from being established. Before such a
> >group can establish itself on the Usenet, there will have to be an
> >electronic poll, and then it will be important with as many no-votes
> >as possible. Anyone with an email address can take part in the ballot
> >VOTE ONLY ONCE - OTHERWISE THE VOTE WILL BE DECLARED NON_VIABLE!!!
> >
> >The discussiongroup's name is: rec.music.white-power
> >THIS IS WHAT YOU MUST DO:
> >
> >1. Send this message to everyone you know whom has an email address,
> >so that they can also vote.
> >
> >2. Send an email to the following address:
> >music-vote@sub-rosa.com
> >Write nothing under "subject", but send the following message:
> >
> >I vote NO on rec.music.white-power
> >
> >BECAUSE THE VOTES ARE COUNTED AUTOMATICALLY IT IS IMPORTANT THAT
> >YOU FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS EXACTLY: SO USE ONLY THE ABOVE EMAIL
> >ADDRESS AND NOTE YOUR VOTE ONLY IN THE MESSAGE FIELD ITSELF. NOTHING
> >ELSE, NOT EVEN YOUR NAME!
> >
> >AND: REMEMBER TO SEND THIS MESSAGE FORWARD TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW!!! --
> > ( O O)
> >-ooO--(_)--Ooo----------------------------
> >Dieter Kirchner
> >dieter@roko.goe.net
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >-----------This message was brought to you by--------------
> >Informationszentrum fuer Rassismusforschung / D.I.R. e.V.
> >Postfach 1221, 35002 Marburg, http://www.uni-marburg.de/dir
> >Listserver: dir-ml-request@lists.uni-marburg.de (subscribe)
> > Tel:06421-37722 FAX 06421-37794
> >
> >
>
>
>
> * PowerEdit 2.5 I believe in The Divine Right of SysOps.
>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 04:52:27 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: My Commentary On The Closure of FM-Citizen Radio !
Message-ID: <01bd3822$0972bd80$b92385c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

My Commentary On The Closure of FM-Citizen Radio

Things are getting better and better at our lovely Gambia-L all the time!The
number of Gambians subscribing to it is swelling on a daily basis,thus
enriching us not only numerically but also in the diversity of views and
opinions.Here is Tombong,tirelessly trying his best to provide us with our
government's view of the situation whenever there a major issue of National
significance of which our members would like some answers.And here is
Halifa,who, even though has been active only just recently,has captivated us
with his powerful analyses of some of the issues that concern us as a
nation.And to cream the ice,one would hope that Mariama Darboe also would be
energized by these new and exciting developments and thus start again to
supply us with the UDP's views on such matters as concern us all and our
nation.So, I Personally thank Tombong for his resourcefulness and Halifa for
the invaluable contributions he has started to make and would like to ask
Mariama to give us back those powerful contributions of hers that we were so
very much used to in the past.

· Those of us who supported the military takeover that brought the present
regime to power did so with the firm belief that,even though violence is not
the best of ways to change a government,there are times in the history of a
people when violence is the only option available to the people to totally
dismantle the entire machinery of a regime that has over a long period of
time developed a pathology of hate and hostility towards the welfare and
development of their own people.To my mind,there was nothing,barring
violence,that anybody could do that could have rescued the Gambian people
from their those three decades of coma and stagnation.Until the coup,Gambia
was without doubt one of the most backward and worst countries on the entire
planet,the hoopla about democratic freedoms notwithstanding.And even though
we will never lose our memory of those compatriots who lost their lives in
that coup to make our deliverance possible,we still believe that that
violence was a moral and historic necessity without which we would still
have been in the inertia that characterised the first thirty years of our
independence.
·
The possibility that the very government that has given so much hope and has
energized and inspired so many Gambians inside and outside would out of
vengefulness shut down a significant source of information and entertainment
for the Gambian people as the FM Citizen Radio is not upsetting to only the
detractors of the government, but also to some of its ardent supporters
..Because, for starters, such an act flies in the face of the claim that
this revolution was undertaken for the sole purpose of bettering the welfare
of the Gambian people.And here is one of the welfares of the Gambian people
being beseiged by the state.Secondly,since we say that we are now a
democracy,it should mean denmocracy all the way.And that means both the
state and the citizens must behave themselves within the law of the land.If
the state is concerned about the rule of law,it must never break the law
just to apprehend someone perceived to have broken the law.That simply
cannot make sense to most Gambians,regardless of the seriousness of the
alleged offence.And,thirdly,our leadership should have by now internalised
and come to terms with the fact that dissent and free expression of views is
to democracy what the Gambian peanuts are to Gambia.And the sooner they have
become comfortable with that fact,the better for them,for us and for our
nation as a whole.

Ensuring that the law of the land is respected by the citizens is a Means to
orderliness and peace in the land and not an End in itself.That is why we
must be careful not to resort to any steps or tactics in the process that
would defeat the very objective we claim to be aiming for. A great country
is a country that is great in ensuring that the dignity of the personhood of
its citizens is inviolable no matter what.Gambia maybe poor,but being
morally great has nothing to do with material comfort.Our history and
culture are replete with those moral ingredients that are the prerequisite
components of a great nation.And as much as our present government is doing
its best to get our country out its material deprivation,it must also be
mindful not to do anything that would render it a moral handicap!

Regards Bassss!


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 20:58:41 +0100
From: "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Gambians Shot
Message-ID: <199802130235.DAA18785@d1o2.telia.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Returning home after a 15 days trip up north, it was devastating to read of
the loss suffered by the Loum family. To be far away from Mom and Dad and
other loved ones is painful enough. But to be snatched away from them while
this young and so violently is next to unbearable.
MAY THEIR SOULS REST IN PERFECT PEACE.
Katim, thanks for the link to the bereaved family.

Momodou S Sidibeh.

----------
> Från: Bassirou Dodou Drammeh <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
> Till: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Ämne: Re: Gambians Shot
> Datum: den 6 februari 1998 05:37
>
> May the animals who destroyed these two young lives get more than they
> deserve here on earth. America! This is not fair! They were your guests,
and
> they were so young.How could their family cope with such a painful double
> tragedy?!
>
>
> Regards Bassss!
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ABDOU <at137@columbia.edu>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Date: Friday, February 06, 1998 10:52 AM
> Subject: Re: Gambians Shot
>
>
> >Folks,
> > Here is some news from the Kansas City Star (www.kstar.com).
> >
> >Two men found shot to death last week near Marshall, Mo., were
> > brothers from Gambia who lived in the Kansas City area
for
> >the last
> > couple of years.
> >
> > The bodies of Sulayman Loum, 27, and Wally Loum, 29, were
> > discovered in a tributary of the Blackwater River by a
> >woman
> > searching for arrowheads about 11 a.m. Jan. 27.
> >
> > "We just don't know what's going on here," said Saline
> >County
> > Sheriff Wally George. "We certainly don't know where they
> >were
> > killed."
> >
> > The men were killed by gunshots. Their heads were wrapped
> >in
> > material and secured by duct tape. George said he was
sure
> >they
> > were not killed where they were found.
> >
> > Both bodies were found on a creek bed beneath a bridge
that
> >runs
> > along a gravel county road. The site is about three miles
> >north of
> > Interstate 70 and about 80 miles east of Kansas City.
> >
> > George said he was unsure exactly where they lived. The
> >brothers
> > had a sister in Kansas City, Kan. Their parents in Gambia
> >also were
> > notified of their deaths.
> >
> >
>
>***************************************************************************

> ****
> >A.TOURAY
> >Computer Science
> >Columbia University
> >New York, NY 10027
> >
> >MY URL ON THE WWW= http://www.cc.columbia.edu/~at137
> >
> >A FINITE IN A LAND OF INFINITY.
> >SEEKING BUT THE REACHABLE.
> >I WANDER AND I WONDER.
> >ALAS, ALL RESPITE IS FINAL.
>
>***************************************************************************

> ****
> >
> >
> >
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 22:01:52 +0100
From: "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: The Embassy & Other matters
Message-ID: <199802130235.DAA18924@d1o2.telia.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Mr. Saidy,
As you have written,I also have no doubt that the problem of
self-censorship has been a difficult reality in the broadcasting and press
services in the Gambia - in fact since former President Jawara's days. I
remember how Mr. Marcel Tomasi (a director of information at one time?)
used to attempt to protect him from questions he thought provocative or
perhaps rude for the old PRESIDENT. But can you tell me why the services of
a competent television journalist like Lansana Jobarteh was terminated? (Or
is he still working? I have not been able to confirm the bad news.) I feel
strongly about this and realise that it is a personal question. But since
you have been personal about Sidia Sagnia I thought you would not mind my
asking you this openly.
You seem to be doing a commendable job in a dificult situation.
Cogratulations, and keep up the good work down there..

Momodou S Sidibeh, Kartong/Stockholm.

----------
> Från: TSaidy1050@aol.com
> Till: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Ämne: The Embassy & Other matters
> Datum: den 9 februari 1998 00:39
>
>
> Gambia -l,
>
> Thank you Amadou for your contribution and the issues raised from the
excerpts
> of the US State Department report need to be dealt with objective by us.
I
> will comment on both since I am the Director of The Gambia Radio and
> Television Services (GRTS) and I also have first hand knowledge on the
issue
> of using false information for the so-called asylum seekers.
>
> I will be the first person to admit that there is some truth to the
report on
> the matter of GRTS. This report was compiled over a long period of time
and it
> does not reflect the present situation or the changes made since I took
over
> in August. Prior to my appointment, there were some bias toward the APRC
and
> the Government. This was not, however, by design. It was mainly due to
self-
> censorship and job security. Some of the staff was not quite sure how
> Government would react certain to things and as such they would not take
any
> chances. I would not blame them, for it could be difficult to find a job
in
> The Gambia. Another factor was that my predecessor, Mr. Ebrima Sagnia, is
the
> brother of Mr. Sidia Sagnia of the UDP, and whatever he does could be
> misinterpreted as a sabotage and as such he was overly careful to the
point
> that the public suffers by not getting balanced information. As for me,
I
> think every body knows where I loyalty lies.
>
> One of the main reasons why I was identified to head this important
> institution was the make it more of a national radio and television and
make
> it accessibly to all Gambians and to serve all political views. From my
own
> judgement (I could be wrong) we are now doing that. We are reporting the
views
> of the opposition and other views. We covered PDOIS' congress and we also
> covered a UDP workshop on Youths. Since I came to GRTS, these were the
only
> two times that a request for coverage was made by the opposition. Things
are
> getting better and I will admit we have a long way to go. We will cover
> rallies of any party as long as we are given sufficient notice, which is
at
> least 48 hours. The interesting thing is the neither the radio or the
> television has reported on any APRC rally since I took over, and there
have
> been quite a few.
>
> I find it very disgusting when people use their own self driven interest
in
> the name of national interest. This has been the case with many so-called
> patriotic citizens clamouring for justice and equal rights in The Gambia.
I
> have known some who have done and written things with the hope that they
will
> be given an asylum in the US or other Western countries. It is a shame,
but it
> is happening and I have written evidences, in black and white. Some of
you may
> remembered that before 1994 Gambians did not need visas to visit the
United
> Kingdom as long as one is staying for less than 90 days and even when
visas
> were required, they were issued free of charge. It was also easier to get
a
> visa to the US as well. This has stopped because of a few selfish
individuals.
> How many members of the list have applied for asylum under false pretext
> (political reasons)? Some claim that they will be imprisoned and other
even
> claim that they will be executed once they come back to The Gambia.
>
> No matter what we think or which party we belong to, we should always
place
> the national interest on top of the agenda. Let's remember what the Late
> Nkurumah, to paraphrase -'seek ye first the political kingdom and all
else
> come second'.
>
> PEACE
> Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 22:31:23 +0100
From: "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Are US Bombs Falling on Bagdad Once Again? Reply: Part 1
Message-ID: <199802130235.DAA19526@d1o2.telia.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Buharry,
That was a truly well-researched and well-written piece. Not only Saddam
Hussein but the Iraqi people are constantly demonised and redemonised in
order to, eventually, transform them into "acceptable" targets for a
high-tech blitz! If Iraq is bombed, there will be many casualties.
Including the U.N. itself.
Thanks for an advanced contribution.
Sidibeh.

----------
.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 23:34:18 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net
Subject: About Gaye & Sillah
Message-ID: <34E3CD4A.3870@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
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Folks:
here is what you can do to help secure the release of Gaye and Sillah
and to get Citizen FM back on the air. (As far as I know the two are
yet to be released!).

Amadou SJ

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<b>Two journalists arrested; radio station closed</b>
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<b>February 10, 1998</b>
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Toronto(IPI/IFEX) - On 5 February 1998, Boubacar Gaye and Ebrima
Sillah, the proprietor and news editor respectively of Citizen FM radio,
were arrested by members of the National Intelligence Agency (NIA) and
brought to NIA headquarters for questioning. <P>
The following day, NIA officials and more than a dozen armed soldiers
sealed off the Citizen FM station and ordered all staff members to leave
the premises. The detention of Gaye and Sillah came shortly after
Citizen FM broadcast a story claiming that the NIA's Director of
Operations had been sacked in connection with an alleged counterfeit
scandal. It seems that the Ministry for Information, in consultation
with the Ministry for Justice, issued an official statement which stated
that the broadcasting of rumors about a staff shake-up at the NIA was
"irresponsible" and "deceptive," and violated both national security
interests and the conditions under which radio and newspaper licenses
are issued.<P>
RECOMMENDED ACTION:<P>
Send appeals to authorities: -telling them that the continued
detention of Gaye and Sillah, as well as the closure of Citizen FM, is a
violation of the right to seek, receive, and impart information, as
guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights -urging them to
ensure that the two journalists are released immediately and
unconditionally, and that Citizen FM is allowed to resume broadcasting<P>
APPEALS TO:<P>
H.E. Yahya Jammeh President and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed
Forces Banjul The Gambia Fax: +220 227 034<P>
Please copy appeals to the source if possible.<P>
Issued 9 February 1998. SOURCE: International Press Institute (IPI),
Vienna. For further information, contact IPI at Spiegelgasse 2, A-1010
Vienna, Austria, tel: +43 1 512 90 11, fax: +43 1 512 90 14, e-mail:
ipivienna@xpoint.at, info@freemedia.at.<P>
The information contained in this action alert is the sole
responsibility of IPI. In citing this material for broadcast or
publication, please credit IPI. <P>
Distributed by The International Freedom Of Expression Exchange
Clearing House, 489 College St. #403, Toronto, Ontario M6G 1A5 CANADA,
tel: +1 416 515 9622, fax: +1 416 515 7879, e-mail: ifex@ifex.org,
Internet site: http://www.ifex.org/

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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 21:51:11 -0800
From: COMPAQ CUSTOMER <seela@oz.net>
To: "'YAYA JALLOW'" <YJ0001@JOVE.ACS>
Subject: E.mail address change
Message-ID: <01BD3800.5EBC5C00@sense-sea-pm1-17.oz.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Assalamaleykum
I'd like to inform everyone receiving this message about an e.mail address change which took effect since 02 /08 /98
Thus I'd greatly appreciate if you can update your file accordingly .
My former e.mail address was ; seela@oz.net

The new one is:faty@foxinernet.net

Wassalamm CHEIKH FATY
?????????????????????



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 08:10:54 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: FWD:Junta leaders flee as ECOMOG takes Freetown
Message-ID: <19980213071221.AAA57042@nijii>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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ABIDJAN, Feb 12 (AFP) - Leaders of Sierra Leone's junta were
fleeing Freetown on Thursday as troops from the west African
intervention force ECOMOG took control of the capital, ECOMOG's
commander told AFP by telephone from his headquarters in Monrovia.
"They have packed their bags and baggage and are retreating
outside the (Freetown) peninsula," Major General Timothy Shelpidi said
of junta forces, who his men, now "inside the city centre," had been
battling for a week.
"They have taken to the hills ... withdrawing in confusion and
disarray," said the ECOMOG commander.......


The rest of the news can be found in the bush list (Gampatriots).

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 03:09:36 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: AFRICAN CUP OF NATIONS
Message-ID: <5f34eb23.34e3ffc2@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

The African Cup of Nations is becoming more interesting day by day and it is
becoming even more unpredictable. Thursday's results are:

Tunis Vs Congo 2 - 1
Angola Vs Namibia 3 - 3
Togo Vs Ghana 2 - 1

Abedi Pele of Ghana has announced that this is his last international
tournament for Ghana. The 35 years Pele, who is also the captain of Ghana,
announced that he is retiring from international competition to give way to
younger and talented Ghanaian players.

PEACE

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 03:16:43 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Sierra Leone and west Africa
Message-ID: <5386c1ee.34e4016e@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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ECOMOG has succeeded in taking over Sierra Leone last evening from the John P.
Koroma and his collegues. The whereabout of the leadership of the Junta is not
known.

Peace

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 12:31:36 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: FWD:Junta leaders flee as ECOMOG takes Freetown
Message-ID: <01bd3862$2df4a480$0b2385c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
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Well,this looks like a great piece of information!But ECOMOG must make sure
that they capture Koroma,else its going to be an endless guerilla warfare,
which nobody realy wants.The Sierra Leonian civil population have already
suffered enough.

Regards Bassss!
-----Original Message-----
From: Camara, Momodou <momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Friday, February 13, 1998 4:08 PM
Subject: FWD:Junta leaders flee as ECOMOG takes Freetown


ABIDJAN, Feb 12 (AFP) - Leaders of Sierra Leone's junta were
fleeing Freetown on Thursday as troops from the west African
intervention force ECOMOG took control of the capital, ECOMOG's
commander told AFP by telephone from his headquarters in Monrovia.
"They have packed their bags and baggage and are retreating
outside the (Freetown) peninsula," Major General Timothy Shelpidi said
of junta forces, who his men, now "inside the city centre," had been
battling for a week.
"They have taken to the hills ... withdrawing in confusion and
disarray," said the ECOMOG commander.......


The rest of the news can be found in the bush list (Gampatriots).



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 05:02:44 -0500
From: Famara Demba <f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:Neo Nazi"white power"
Message-ID: <B0000188994@merlin.netexp.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Members,

I refer to the missive posted by HP Flueger in regards to the Neo Nazi
Movement. I would like to inform you that voting on the issue in question
here has already taken place so please ignore the request. Otherwise any
postings made to that address will automatically bounce back to the
sender(s). The voting took place in the year 1996 and it was over since
then. People overwhelmingly voted NO and the movement was denied the
chance. I hope we all learn to live and let live.

I thank you all and keep hopes alive.

Famara Giffa
Columbus,Ohio.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 14:02:19 -0500
From: Lamin Camara <radise@accessv.com>
To: amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net
Cc: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: About Gaye & Sillah
Message-ID: <34E498BB.1013030@accessv.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------2E32BA97D0EE37C8C506EFE3"


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A. Scattred Janneh wrote:

> Folks:
> here is what you can do to help secure the release of Gaye and Sillah
> and to get Citizen FM back on the air. (As far as I know the two are
> yet to be released!).
>
> Amadou SJ
>
Mr. Janneh, thanks for forwarding the valuable information to the list.
I am sure everyone is ... concerned about what took place in our beloved
country: The sudden forceful and unjust closure of the "Citizen FM
Radio." Such an ... action, taken by the present regime, is a blatantly
oppression of the press, for its freedom of expression, and it is indeed
deplorable! The ... claim made by the Ministries of Information and
Justice, ..., that the ...: "broadcasting of rumors about a staff
shake-up at the N.I.A, ...violated ... the national security ....," is,
in my opinion, a pretext, to justify the government's ... action. [I am
sure, the general public, too, finds such an action deplorable.] The
people of The Gambia [the general public] have the right to know what is
going on within their [our] government-- and have the right to voice
their concerns about any wrongdoing--without any fear of
persecution/prosecution. And, if those rights are trampled, it is a
blatant infringement of their constitutional rights.

I therefore, urge everyone to send his/her message to: President Yahya
Jammeh and his ... regime, to vehemently protest against the unjust
closure of the "Citizen FM Radio," and the persistent detention of Mr.
Boubacar Gaye and Mr. Ebrima Sillah; and demand their immediately and
unconditional released from the detention, to be able to resume their
operation of "Citizen FM Radio." Citizen FM Radio is the voice of
freedom of expression. [President Jammeh and his regime, should be
reminded, once again, that freedom of expression, is a basic universal
fundamental Human Right; they should be reminded that the oppression of
the press, cannot, and must not be allowed in any free democratic
society!]

For those of you who may wish to send messages to the president, by fax,
there is a free-trial, and cost-efficient, versatile Internet faxing
software available for ... downloads, on a Web site of a company called
"Faxsav." As a free-trial user, its Internet faxing software allows you
to send five free-tial fax messages to any fax machine (with a valid fax
number), anywhere in the world (including The Gambia.) [The good thing I
like about this faxing software is that, after sending a fax message, it
eventually notifies you about the successful delivery, or delivery
failure of a fax message.] You can access the company's Web site at:
http://www.faxsav.com.

Please note: if sending a fax message to The Gambia over the Internet,
do not include the "011," or else, it will be returned back to you.
Instead, you would type: 220, and the fax number. For example, if I want
to send a fax message to the president's fax number (which is 220 227
034), over the Internet, this is how I would type the address at the
"To" e-mail field: 220 227 034@faxsav.com.

Thanks for reading.

Lamin Camara, Toronto.

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<P>A. Scattred Janneh wrote:
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>
<PRE WRAP>Folks:
here is what you can do to help secure the release of Gaye and Sillah
and to get Citizen FM back on the air.  (As far as I know the two are
yet to be released!).

Amadou SJ</PRE>
</BLOCKQUOTE>

<DIV WRAP></DIV>


<P WRAP>Mr. Janneh, thanks for forwarding the valuable information to the
list. I am sure everyone is ... concerned about what took place in our
beloved country: The sudden forceful and unjust closure of the "Citizen
FM Radio." Such an ... action, taken by the present regime, is a blatantly
oppression of the press, for its freedom of expression, and it is indeed
deplorable! The ... claim made by the Ministries of Information and Justice,
...., that the ...: "broadcasting of rumors about a staff shake-up at the
N.I.A, ...violated ... the national security ....," is, in my opinion,
a pretext, to justify the government's ... action. [I am sure, the general
public, too, finds such an action deplorable.] The people of The Gambia
[the general public] have the right to know what is going on within their
[our] government-- and have the right to voice their concerns about any
wrongdoing--without any fear of <B>persecution/prosecution</B>. And, if
those rights are trampled, it is a blatant infringement of their constitutional
rights.
<DIV WRAP></DIV>


<P WRAP>I therefore, urge everyone to send <B>his/her</B> message to: President
Yahya Jammeh and his ... regime, to vehemently protest against the unjust
closure of  the "Citizen FM Radio," and the persistent detention of
Mr. Boubacar Gaye and Mr. Ebrima Sillah; and demand their immediately and
unconditional released from the detention, to be able to resume their operation
of "Citizen FM Radio." Citizen FM Radio is the voice of freedom of expression.
[President Jammeh and his regime, should be reminded, once again, that
freedom of expression, is a basic universal fundamental Human Right; they
should be reminded that the oppression of the press, cannot, and must not
be allowed in any free democratic society!]
<DIV WRAP></DIV>


<P WRAP>For those of you who may wish to send messages to the president,
by fax, there is a free-trial, and cost-efficient, versatile Internet faxing
software available for ... downloads, on a Web site of a company called
"Faxsav." As a free-trial user, <B>its</B> Internet faxing software allows
you to send five free-tial fax messages to any fax machine (with a valid
fax number), anywhere in the world (including <B>T</B>he Gambia.) [The
good thing I like about this faxing software is that, after sending a fax
message, it eventually notifies you about the successful delivery, or delivery
failure of a fax message.] You can access the company's Web site at: <B><A HREF="http://www.faxsav.com">http://www.faxsav.com</A></B>.
<DIV WRAP></DIV>


<P WRAP>Please note: if sending a fax message to The Gambia over the Internet,
do not include the "011," or else, it will be returned back to you. Instead,
you would type: 220, and the fax number. For example, if I want to send
a fax message to the president's fax number (which is 220 227 034), over
the Internet, this is how I would type the address at the "To" e-mail field:
220 227 034@faxsav.com.
<DIV WRAP></DIV>


<P WRAP>Thanks for reading.
<DIV WRAP></DIV>


<P WRAP>Lamin Camara, Toronto.
</BODY>
</HTML>

--------------2E32BA97D0EE37C8C506EFE3--


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 20:00:36 +0100
From: Bala S Jallow <bala@algonet.se>
To: gambia-l gambia-l <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Fwd: http://www.sub-rosa.com/white-power/]
Message-ID: <34E49854.9008E697@algonet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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--------------EFFF24DF9093528A17697AD4
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--
/Bala & Family


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Received: (qmail 3211 invoked from network); 13 Feb 1998 14:54:00 +0100
Received: from unknown (HELO hub?lid.aga.se) (193.180.189.4)
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From: mamadou.jallow@aga.se
To: rosario@oden.se,
bala@algonet.se
Message-ID: <412565AA.004C01DE.00@hub_lid.aga.se>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 14:51:45 +0100
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---------------------- Forwarded by Mamadou Jallow/Sweden/AGA on 98-02-13
15:55 ---------------------------


mikko.kaipainen@posten.se on 98-02-13 12:39:02

To: Mamadou Jallow/Sweden/AGA
cc:
Subject: http://www.sub-rosa.com/white-power/



Content-type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable



Kolla in l=E4nken : http://www.sub-rosa.com/white-power/
/Mikko


=




--------------EFFF24DF9093528A17697AD4--


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 14:08:11 -0500
From: Sailey_Sey <SeyS@husson.edu>
To: "'Morro krubally '" <jamba@cyberramp.net>,
"'The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List '" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Unwarranted Mail
Message-ID: <B1AFF5622706D11180320000F80326D6273B03@mail.husson.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

List members,
Please listen to Lang's suggestion. Let's keep personal messages
personal. I always have 30-40 messages a day. Of these, only five-ten
are nonpersonal. If this "unwarranted" mail is curbed, I'll have more
time to read what's important and so would the rest of the group. I'm
tired of having to sit on my computer deleting all that mail.
Salam
Sailey Sey

-----Original Message-----
From: Morro krubally
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
Sent: 2/11/98 11:01 AM
Subject: Re: Unwarranted Mail

Lang:
Your suggestion of directing personal Email to the intended party cannot
be
said any better. this suggestion is long overdue. Some of the Email I've
come across are abundantly unimportant to the Bantaba; they are personal
and should have been directed to the intended recipient. Some of the
mails
are sent in duplicates and even in multiples of the same message. By not
staying inacordance with the intended purpose of this forum, we are
taking
away from its importance. Often It takes me considerable length of time
to
combat the barrage of email to delete those I find in duplicates and
personal. this could lead to a possible negative impact on the Bantaba,
hence reduction of listed membership.
I hope the list managers will take note.
Good day,
Morro Krubally

----------
> From: malang maane <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Unwarranted Mail
> Date: Tuesday, February 10, 1998 4:59 AM
>
> Hi guys,
> I have a couple of suggestions. I would like to ask you guys to please
> direct individual mails to whoever they are supposed to go to instead
of
> sending it to the whole list.Please use the right means of subscribing
> people to the list..I would kindly ask the list administrators to send
out
> a message explaining the procedure. I believe this will eliminate a
lot
of
> unwarranted messages.
> Your cooperation in this matter is highly appreciated.
> Lang Jr.
>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 20:51:32 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New members of the Week
Message-ID: <19980213195303.AAA10158@nijii>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Greetings,
First of all I would like to welcome all new members
added to the bantaba during the week. You can send a brief
introduction to gambia-l@u.washington.edu. We look forward to your
contributions.

Secondly, as you can see we have changed our way of introducing new
members with the hope that it can reduce the number of personal
messages being sent to the list.

Regards,
Momodou Camara

*******************************************************
http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara

**"Start by doing what's necessary, then what's
possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible"***

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 17:24:29 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Sierra Leone and a Poem about Africa
Message-ID: <199802132224.RAA19320@willow.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Thank you Sailey for the compliment. Sometimes when I am tired and hungry
I find myself in fighting mood. How are you doing at school? Awa told me that you
doing a marvellous job. Please keep up with those grades!

I have been ill for a while but I am now back in shape. Infact I am in Virginia for the past 2
weeks in Charllotesville. I can not wait to get out of this place next week. Till then Anna
and the kids are sticking it out in the cold. No easy thing when you live in our part of
world. Well I must go now ITS FRIDAY!!!!


malanding jaiteh

>
> Hi Malanding,
> I haven't talked to you in a long time. I thought i'll say hi. How are
> Ya Anna and the kids especially Fatoumata. Give them my regards. Awa
> said you were sick, Hope you're feeling better now. I hope you hear from
> Adama. By the way, I enjoy you excellent insights on the bantaba. Keep
> up the good work, and stay in touch.
> Sailey Sey
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 18:33:41 EST
From: MODOUMASS@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: My Commentary On The Closure of FM-Citizen Radio !
Message-ID: <4b5b849c.34e4d857@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Dear Bassss,

I read your article on the closure of Citizen-FM with keen interest. I would
agree with you in the fact that Jammeh regime should adhere by the democratic
norm, that is he shoulld recognise that not all people share his view about
how things should go in the Gambia. However, I think your advice is falling
on deaf ears as the governtment is in continuous disregard of the rule of law
and 1997 constitution.

On the second point of the AFPRC's deliverance of the Gambian people from
thirty years of coma does not show clarity on your part (no offence meant).
What should be realised by all of us is that deliverance is not given but
won/gained. The task of advancement of the Gambian people rest squarely on
the shoulders of the Gambian people and no one else. No single person can
liberate the people. Each and every-one of us tries to his/her best ability
to contribute his /her quota. It is this same notion of a messiah/saviour
that kept us backwards this thirty years(and as you said in a deep coma).

What economic deliverance are you talking about? Please tell me. I am dying
to know. Don't we still have hordes of unemployed youths, whose only hope is
to es-cape abroad for a better life. No-hopers as far as the Gambia is
concerned. Let us stop apologising for the regime and work tirelessly towards
making it adhere to the rule of law and 1997 constitution.

If you differ or can provide answers to questions raised I would be very much
obliged.

Yours
modomass

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 18:33:42 EST
From: MODOUMASS@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SV: The Embassy & Other matters
Message-ID: <7743942b.34e4d859@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Tombong,

Can you do us a favour and try to be non apologetic for the Gambia government
policy on the pubic media. Any small child can tell GRTS is nothing but the
mouth-piece of the APRC. Since when did decent journalist or networks wait to
be invited to cover newsworthy events. You yourself did say that you
understand why self regulation. If things where normal there would be no need
for such acts.

Recently I watched a recording of events of the year on GRTS and not a single
mention was made of anything else(occuring within the Gambia) except it
contains the President or members of his cabinet or Party. I am left to be
convinced still.

BE REAL TOMBONG!!! I for one can not be hoodwinked. You cannot have it both
ways.

modoumass


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 20:09:39 -0500
From: Famara Demba <f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:Unwarranted letters
Message-ID: <B0000196903@merlin.netexp.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

List members,

It is to my understanding that Malanding S. Jaiteh and Sailey Sey are both
against unwarranted mails( personal mails) posted to this list. Therefore I
would assume that their recent letters were unintentionally posted to the
list. Is that right Folks? Correct me if I'm wrong please will you? I am
pretty sure that most of the personal mails seen on this list were posted
unintentionally. Mistakes are human and I hope we always learn from them.

Thank you and keep hopes alive.

Famara Demba,
Columbus, Ohio.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 23:50:18 -0000
From: "archibald.graham@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SSHFC - Brusubi Housing Project
Message-ID: <B0000053939@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Archibald H. R. Graham" <archibald.graham@commit.gm>
via Commit


I thought you might be interested in the following announcement in the
papers today:

==============================================
Social Security and Housing Finance Corporation

Public Announcement

Brusubi Housing Project Commercial Serviced Plots

As part of its commercial operations under phase 1 of the Brusubi Housing
Project, the SSHFC has under option 2 of the project a provision for direct
sale of about 300 serviced plots to those Gambians who cannot otherwise
participate in the formalised option 1 process of filling in application
forms and subsequently attending interviews. Notably among these are
Gambians resident abroad.

The SSHFC hereby wishes to inform the general public that application forms
for these serviced plots can now be purchased at the SSHFC Head Office
Building, 61 ECOWAS Avenue, Banjul, Effective Tuesday 10th February 1998.
The deadline for the return of these forms is Friday 10th April 1998.

A non refundable processing fee of 150 is being charged for each
application form.
================================================

E&OE

Regards to all
Archi


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 10:08:17 +0100
From: momodou@inform-bbs.dk (Momodou Camara)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Fwd: Sierra Leone: Civilians deliberately killed as fightingengulfs
Message-ID: <3021668318.29182177@inform-bbs.dk>

---forwarded mail START---

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
* News Release Issued by the International Secretariat of Amnesty
International *
AI INDEX: AFR 51/6/98
11 FEBRUARY 1998

Sierra Leone: Civilians deliberately killed as fighting engulfs Freetown
and Provinces

Sierra Leoneans risk being arrested, tortured and killed in the chaos and
insecurity in Freetown, Amnesty International stated today as it called on
all those involved in the fighting not to attack civilians.

Fierce fighting continues between West African forces, known as ECOMOG
and dominated by Nigeria, and the ruling Armed Forces Revolutionary
Council (AFRC), joined by the former armed opposition Revolutionary United
Front (RUF).

Recent reports received by Amnesty International describe soldiers and
RUF forces, now joined by Liberian fighters, going from house to house of
those they suspect of opposing them. The organization is concerned that
people perceived as supporters of the ousted government of President Ahmad
Tejan Kabbah face a serious risk of being arrested, tortured, ill-treated
or executed.

While fighting in Freetown continues, civilians in Southern and
Eastern Provinces are facing an equally desperate situation as they are
caught in fighting between a civil defence force, known as the kamajors,
who support President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah, and AFRC and RUF forces. Amnesty
International has received information that unarmed civilians are being
tortured and killed by both sides. Thousands, particularly women and
children, have fled to neighbouring Liberia to escape the violence.

Several prominent members of the community in Kenema, in Eastern
Province, including the chairman of the town council, B.S. Massaquoi -- who
are accused of supporting the kamajors -- have been arrested and remain in
detention; many of them have been tortured.

On Sunday, 8 February, at least 300 soldiers and RUF forces entered
the town of Kenema, posing as kamajors, and called for civilians to join
them; those who came out into the street were killed.

The humanitarian situation in Sierra Leone, already critical, has
deteriorated still further with the recent increase in hostilities: there
is a severe lack of food and medicine. Amnesty International is calling
for humanitarian agencies to be allowed to operate without threats to their
safety.

Thousands of civilians caught in the fighting in Freetown are
attempting to leave. Civilians trying to leave the town by road and get
behind ECOMOG lines have been obstructed by soldiers and RUF fighters.
Amnesty International is calling on all sides involved in the fighting to
ensure that civilians are not prevented from leaving.

Since the military coup on 25 May 1997 Amnesty International has
repeatedly called on the international community to ensure that the
protection and respect of human rights feature prominently in any decisions
and actions taken in efforts to find a solution to the political crisis in
Sierra Leone. It has particularly called on the Economic Community of
West African States (ECOWAS), in the event of a military intervention by
its forces, to ensure that they adhere to international humanitarian and
human rights standards at all times.
ENDS.../


****************************************************************
You may repost this message onto other sources provided the main
text is not altered in any way and both the header crediting
Amnesty International and this footer remain intact. Only the
list subscription message may be removed.
****************************************************************
---forwarded mail END---

--- OffRoad 1.9v registered to Momodou Camara




------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 08:32:09 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: SSHFC - Brusubi Housing Project
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19980214083209.006910b0@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Archi,
Thank you for the information. How much are the plots selling for?
Paul.



At 11:50 PM 2/13/98 -0000, you wrote:
>Sent by "Archibald H. R. Graham" <archibald.graham@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
>
>I thought you might be interested in the following announcement in the
>papers today:
>
>==============================================
> Social Security and Housing Finance Corporation
>
> Public Announcement
>
> Brusubi Housing Project Commercial Serviced Plots
>
>As part of its commercial operations under phase 1 of the Brusubi Housing
>Project, the SSHFC has under option 2 of the project a provision for direct
>sale of about 300 serviced plots to those Gambians who cannot otherwise
>participate in the formalised option 1 process of filling in application
>forms and subsequently attending interviews. Notably among these are
>Gambians resident abroad.
>
>The SSHFC hereby wishes to inform the general public that application forms
>for these serviced plots can now be purchased at the SSHFC Head Office
>Building, 61 ECOWAS Avenue, Banjul, Effective Tuesday 10th February 1998.
>The deadline for the return of these forms is Friday 10th April 1998.
>
>A non refundable processing fee of 150 is being charged for each
>application form.
>================================================
>
>E&OE
>
>Regards to all
>Archi
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 12:10:49 EST
From: JENGFANNEH@aol.com
To: Gambia-l@U.Washington.edu
Subject: Citizen FM........Independent Media
Message-ID: <72a763d5.34e5d01b@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Dear Mr President,

Like most Gambians, I have personally witnessed the end of the Jawara
presidency and the beginning of a new era, an era to be led by a new
generation of hope. Sir, you are the leader of this generation that is suppose
to be very instrumental in setting the country to a path to justice, liberty
and plentiful. Expectation has always been very high, eventhough your
youthfulness was looked at critically by pundits and the older generation. I
remember watching you on TV during an Independence celebration, meeting with
the diplomatic core; Sir, your candour, truthfulness, bluntness and commitment
to a message of truth, so articulately delivered kept me on my feet.
Admiration was an understatement, I was so proud of this gutsy young soldier.
Somehow, I still like to believe that it is in your character to be honest,
fairminded and driven by the mission of justice, but the poignant question is
what has the Presidency done to you. Furthemore, please ask yourself this
critical question, If Mr. Jawara was still the president of the Gambia,
hypothetically, and was confronted with the Baboucarr Gaye's issue, would he
aactally arrest him and close the Radio station. Most folks do not think he
would have acted in that manner, Now if the worst of our leaders never
believed in stepping on peoples rights, then we are definitely on he wrong
path to democracy, liberty and justice for all. It is going to take a little
bit of risk and bold leadership, and being overtly paranoid cannot help in
putting the country to the new frontier of justice for all. To conclude, I am
appealing to you, to please release Baboucarr Gaye and re-open the radio
station. It is the right thing to do, the constitutional thing to do. You are
the architect of this document---the law of the land and it should definitely
mean something to you.

Thanks for your time

Musa Jeng

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 15:53:27 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Unwarranted letters
Message-ID: <199802142053.PAA25291@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

You are absolutely correct Mr Demba. I am one of those vocal about sending personal
mail to the entire list. Unfortunately I did not notice that I sent it to all.
My apoplogies to all.

malanding jaiteh

ps thank you for puting it to my notice. keep up the good work down there!!

> List members,
>
> It is to my understanding that Malanding S. Jaiteh and Sailey Sey are both
> against unwarranted mails( personal mails) posted to this list. Therefore I
> would assume that their recent letters were unintentionally posted to the
> list. Is that right Folks? Correct me if I'm wrong please will you? I am
> pretty sure that most of the personal mails seen on this list were posted
> unintentionally. Mistakes are human and I hope we always learn from them.
>
> Thank you and keep hopes alive.
>
> Famara Demba,
> Columbus, Ohio.
>


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 17:43:39 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Citizen FM........Independent Media
Message-ID: <34E61E1B.555D@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

JENGFANNEH@aol.com wrote:
>
> Dear Mr President,
>
> Like most Gambians, I have personally witnessed the end of the Jawara
> presidency and the beginning of a new era, an era to be led by a new
> generation of hope. Sir, you are the leader of this generation that is suppose
> to be very instrumental in setting the country to a path to justice, liberty
> and plentiful. Expectation has always been very high, eventhough your
> youthfulness was looked at critically by pundits and the older generation. I
> remember watching you on TV during an Independence celebration, meeting with
> the diplomatic core; Sir, your candour, truthfulness, bluntness and commitment
> to a message of truth, so articulately delivered kept me on my feet.
> Admiration was an understatement, I was so proud of this gutsy young soldier.
> Somehow, I still like to believe that it is in your character to be honest,
> fairminded and driven by the mission of justice, but the poignant question is
> what has the Presidency done to you. Furthemore, please ask yourself this
> critical question, If Mr. Jawara was still the president of the Gambia,
> hypothetically, and was confronted with the Baboucarr Gaye's issue, would he
> aactally arrest him and close the Radio station. Most folks do not think he
> would have acted in that manner, Now if the worst of our leaders never
> believed in stepping on peoples rights, then we are definitely on he wrong
> path to democracy, liberty and justice for all. It is going to take a little
> bit of risk and bold leadership, and being overtly paranoid cannot help in
> putting the country to the new frontier of justice for all. To conclude, I am
> appealing to you, to please release Baboucarr Gaye and re-open the radio
> station. It is the right thing to do, the constitutional thing to do. You are
> the architect of this document---the law of the land and it should definitely
> mean something to you.
>
> Thanks for your time
>
> Musa Jeng

Musa:

whether Jammeh is responsive to our letters is a crucial question, but
we should at least send faxes to his office to register our disgust with
the recent actions against Gaye, Sillah, and Citizen FM. It's great to
see some action on your part.

Amadou SJ

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 21:36:30 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Citizen FM........Independent Media (fwd)
Message-ID: <199802150236.VAA26640@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Hi folks, this is intended for the whole group but I sent it Amadou intead. We need your inputs.

malanding

Forwarded message:
>From msjaiteh@mtu.edu Sat Feb 14 19:56:57 1998
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
Message-Id: <199802150056.TAA26313@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Subject: Re: Citizen FM........Independent Media
To: amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 19:56:56 -0500 (EST)
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
In-Reply-To: <34E61E1B.555D@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net> from "A. Scattred Janneh" at Feb 14, 98 05:43:39 pm
X-Mailer: ELM [version 2.4 PL24]
Content-Type: text

After following the many messages about the Citizen Radio and the detention of Baboucarr Gaye
and Ebrima Sillah I must say that I am impressed by the comments made by the overwhelming
majority. I think that we can make the letter to the President more effective if we use the many
media now available to us. We can write a joint letter and those interested in becoming
signatories can submit their names to the drafting team and we attach it to the letter. The
letter will be faxed as originally suggested but also copies sent to all the major news media in
the country including GRTS. I must emphasize this is not to condemn but to express concern as
members of the greater Gambian diaspora. I will suggest Jengfanneh (with your permission) and Dr
Janneh to lead the team in drafting. As every minute spent in detention is time wasted, i will
suggest that we do this as soon as Monday.

malanding jaiteh


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Feb 1998 01:25:37 EST
From: Gunjur@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SSHFC - Brusubi Housing Project
Message-ID: <876ab3b8.34e68a63@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Information from my sister is that the largest of the plots sell for $5000
and the smaller ones for less than that. She said the size of the large plots
is the same as those at Kanifing estates. Will try to get exact dimensions.

Jabou


In a message dated 2/14/98 8:42:20 AM, you wrote:

<<Archi,
Thank you for the information. How much are the plots selling for?
Paul.



At 11:50 PM 2/13/98 -0000, you wrote:
>Sent by "Archibald H. R. Graham" <archibald.graham@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
>
>I thought you might be interested in the following announcement in the
>papers today:
>
>==============================================
> Social Security and Housing Finance Corporation
>
> Public Announcement
>
> Brusubi Housing Project Commercial Serviced Plots
>
>As part of its commercial operations under phase 1 of the Brusubi Housing
>Project, the SSHFC has under option 2 of the project a provision for direct
>sale of about 300 serviced plots to those Gambians who cannot otherwise
>participate in the formalised option 1 process of filling in application
>forms and subsequently attending interviews. Notably among these are
>Gambians resident abroad.
>
>The SSHFC hereby wishes to inform the general public that application forms
>for these serviced plots can now be purchased at the SSHFC Head Office
>Building, 61 ECOWAS Avenue, Banjul, Effective Tuesday 10th February 1998.
>The deadline for the return of these forms is Friday 10th April 1998.
>
>A non refundable processing fee of 150 is being charged for each
>application form.
>================================================
>
>E&OE
>
>Regards to all
>Archi
>
>
>


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------------------------------

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