Bantaba in Cyberspace
Bantaba in Cyberspace
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ | Invite a friend
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Education Forum
 Gambia-L Archives from University of Washington
 gambia-l: LOG9802A - Digest 105
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
| More
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

Posted - 10 Sep 2021 :  16:46:04  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
GAMBIA-L Digest 105

Topics covered in this issue include:

1) query: Kompins
by "Jobst Mnderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
2) SV: re:conference
by "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
3) Re: query: Kompins
by BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
4) Re: Joke
by "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
5) An alternative strategy for macro-economic development (A vision without a realistic foundation is a castle built in thin air)
by "foroyaa@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
6) Re: conference
by TSaidy1050 <TSaidy1050@aol.com>
7) Re: An alternative strategy for macro-economic development (A vision without a realistic foundation is a castle built in thin air)
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
8) Re: mail overload?
by Saikou B M Njai <sbn13@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>
9) Re: Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri
by "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
10) Re: Email Update
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
11) Re: Part 3 cont
by "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
12) Is it a new Gambia?
by "janko.fofana@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
13) sutura and other wolof words
by "Heidi Skramstad" <heidis@amadeus.cmi.no>
14) Re: Dumping on the developing world (fw)
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
15) RE: Email Update
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
16) Re: Dumping on the developing world (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
17) Re : Joke (again)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
18) RE: Re : Joke (again)
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
19) Re: Is it a new Gambia
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
20) RE: Re : Joke (again)
by "Heidi Skramstad" <heidis@amadeus.cmi.no>
21) Re: Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
22) Re: Re : Joke (again)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
23) Re: sutura and other wolof words
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
24) Re: New address and members
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
25) Re: Re : Joke (again)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
26) Re: Part 3 cont
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
27) Re: sutura and other wolof words
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
28) Re: New members
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
29) Re: Is it a New Gambia
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
30) RE: Re : Joke (again)
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
31) Re: Email Update
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
32) Re: Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
33) Remote sensing opportunity (fwd)
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
34) Re: Joke
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
35) Re: conference
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
36) RE: Email Update
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
37) Re: Dumping on the developing world (fwd)
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
38) New Edition of FRESH
by "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
39) Re: Is it a new Gambia?
by "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
40) RE: Email Update
by AYONELSONHOMIAH@compuserve.com
41) introduction
by "Ousman Sawaneh" <osawaneh@post9.tele.dk>
42) Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
43) Re: introduction
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
44) [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
45) Re: Joke
by BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
46) Fw: Music and Dance Ensemble
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
47) SV: Email Update
by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
48) Re: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
49) unsubscribe
by "Papa N'Jie" <papa1@mdx.ac.uk>
50) RE: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
51) new member
by Sainey Keita <S.Keita@reading.ac.uk>
52) Re: Email Update
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
53) Re: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
by "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
54) New member and Eid mubarak
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
55) Unsubscribe
by "lamin" <wintersu@dlc.fi>
56) New Member
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
57) Re: sutura and other wolof words
by "NJAGA JAGNE" <jagnen25@hotmail.com>
58) Re: An alternative strategy for macro-economic development (A vision without a realistic foundation is a castle built in thin air)
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
59) Re: sutura and other wolof words
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
60) Ignorance
by SANG1220 <SANG1220@aol.com>
61) Re: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
by ELLA23K <ELLA23K@aol.com>
62) Fw: Watch Out: Globalisation is Re-drawing Africa's Borders (fwd)
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
63) new member
by "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
64) (no subject)
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
65) New member
by "Anthony Loum" <sambabalangarr@classic.msn.com>
66) Gro Harlem Brundtland Elected WHO Director-General
by "Momodou Camara" <nijii@hotmail.com>
67) Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
by "Alpha Robinson" <garob1@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
68) (Fwd) Message from Momodou Buhary Gassama
by Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no>
69) Fulani-lessons in Oslo?
by Svend Ole Kvilesjo <svendok@online.no>
70) Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
by "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
71) ORGANIATIONS
by LaminLams.Bojang@fco.mh.se (LaminLams Bojang)
72) Re: Gro Harlem Brundtland Elected WHO Director-General
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
73) Re: (Fwd) Message from Momodou Buhary Gassama
by MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
74) SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
by BobbySil <BobbySil@aol.com>
75) Re: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
by "astrid christensen-tasong" <attatas@hotmail.com>
76) SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
77) Re: WHY AINT THE ECONOMIC BAND PLAYING (fwd)
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
78) Eid day???
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
79) Fw: M$ Monitor: Contact DOJ
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
80) Fw: Africa: Policy Outlook 1998
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
81) The University Extension Programme (UEP)
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
82) Scandal
by SANG1220 <SANG1220@aol.com>
83) Re: Eid day???
by Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
84) Re: Scandal
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
85) Re: Eid day???
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
86) gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
by "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
87) New members
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
88) Re: Eid day???
by Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
89) Test!!!
by Amadou Kabir Njie <Amadou.Kabir.Njie@Aviaplan.no>
90) Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
by "Momodou Camara" <nijii@hotmail.com>
91) Re: New members
by SADAMS <SADAMS@geog.gla.ac.uk>
92) (Fwd) Re: New members
by SADAMS <SADAMS@geog.gla.ac.uk>
93) EID MUBARAK!!!!
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
94) Festive Koriteh Weekend Party
by BobbySil <BobbySil@aol.com>
95) Fwd:president's ramadhan message (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
96) Re: Eid day???
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
97) Re: Eid day???
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
98) Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
99) Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
100) Scandal
by SANG1220@aol.com
101) Fwd: Gambia High School
by Andy Lyons <alyons@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu>
102) Re: Scandal
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
103) Re: Scandal
by Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
104) Re: EID MUBARAK!!!!
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
105) Re: Festive Koriteh Weekend Party
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
106) Re: Fwd:president's ramadhan message (fwd)
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
107) Re: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
by ELLA23K@aol.com
108) Re: Eid day???
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
109) Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
110) Re: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
111) Re: Gambia High School
by ELLA23K@aol.com
112) Re: Scandal
by BobbySil@aol.com
113) Re: Scandal
by BobbySil@aol.com
114) GAMBIAN MEETING IN ATLANTA
by TSaidy1050@aol.com
115) SV: Hotels and resthouses in The Gambia
by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
116) Re: SV: Hotels and resthouses in The Gambia
by Theodor Stenevang med <v97tst@sokrates.mip.ki.se>
117) For Entrepreneurs!
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
118) Eid El Fitr - from Malanding S Jaiteh
by msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S Jaiteh)
119) FW: Per minute charges for your internet service -Reply
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
120) Re: Scandal
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
121) Re: GAMBIAN MEETING IN ATLANTA
by BobbySil@aol.com
122) Re: Scandal (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
123) Re: Scandal (fwd)
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
124) Help (especially from those in The Gambia)!
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
125) Re: Scandal
by "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
126) new member
by "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
127) Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
128) Re: Help (especially from those in The Gambia)!
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
129) suggestion
by edi sidibeh <lha7edsi@kyamk.fi>
130) [Fwd: GRATITUDE]
by "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
131) Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
by "momodou njie" <momhnjie@hotmail.com>
132) Re: suggestion
by BobbySil@aol.com
133) Re: Scandal (fwd)
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
134) Re: Scandal (fwd)
by Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
135) Re: Scandal (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
136) Resp.
by Lamin Jaiteh <ljaiteh@mail.wsu.edu>
137) Re: Resp.
by "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
138) Re: Resp.
by BobbySil@aol.com
139) Re: Scandal
by BobbySil@aol.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 05:19:29 PST
From: "Jobst Mnderlein" <joppl@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: query: Kompins
Message-ID: <19980125131930.25631.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

hello,
could anybody please advise me on how to translate the expression
"Kompin" or explain to me what a Yahya-Kompin is? I would be very
greatful.

Jobst

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 15:33:39 +0100
From: "Momodou S Sidibeh" <momodou.sidibeh@stockholm.mail.telia.com>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: re:conference
Message-ID: <199801251444.PAA18670@d1o2.telia.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Eventhough I clearly quoted Mr. Ndow before writing about what and why I
disagreed with his opinion; and despite the fact that my contribution on Is
It In Our Nature has been clearly numbered, and that my responses to Bass'
subsequent questions and comments were adequately in order, Mr. Ndow says
he is uncertain as to what I have been referring to. Unfortunately, I
cannot be more precise than I have already been. I wrote:
"So because our culture is oral, well-educated Gambians like yourself,
Latjor, and me should be excused for suggesting half-baked solutions to our
problems, a catalogue of past failures, resting on confusion, not
withstanding? (Let me remind you that President Yahya Jammeh is very keen
in dismissing incompetents)".
I have no doubt whatsoever that Mr. Ndow seems to have been offended by
the phrase ..."half-baked solutions"...Without wasting much time let me say
that I sincerely regret using that phrase. I could have used a less sloppy
one.

Secondly, Mr. Ndow seems to believe that I have been waging an intellectual
insurgency against him as an individual and other individual groups of
Gambians. It remains a mystery why Mr. Ndow thinks that I have insinuated,
anywhere, that he is anti-analytical i.e he is the enemy of analysis. I
think a clarification from Mr. Ndow is in order here, not only because I
intend to continue to discuss ideas irrespective of their source, but also
to help us avoid any future misunderstandings.The issues at stake were
ideas and not the individuals or groups of individuals behind the ideas.
Nothing that I wrote, except perhaps where I directly referred to Bass,
warrants such personalization.

Thirdly, I think there is a streak of tragedy in all of this. After
voluntarily using my time and supplying you with so many interesting ideas,
even if all them were half-witted, the most important thing Mr. Ndow seems
to have noticed is my insidious attempt to villify his intelligence and
that of other groups of Gambians. I definitely hope that if there are
others on Gambia-l who thought that too, they would have said so.
BTW, I wish you the best of luck in your studies, and with the conference.

Momodou Sidibeh, Kartong/Stockholm.
----------
> Frn: latjor ndow <latjor@hotmail.com>
> Till: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> mne: re:conference
> Datum: den 23 januari 1998 06:10
>
> Greetings:
> Since I am not sure if some of what Mr. Sidibeh had to say was in direct
> reference to some of my statements regarding the conference I am
> proposing for us to have in the Washington area (i.e. his comments on
> '...half baked ideas ...'), I shall safely distance myself from drawing
> any conclusions or jumping into the 'Is is in our nature debate' that
> has been going on. There is too much work for me at the moment to
> indulge in analysis at the moment. Organizing a major event along with a
> full course load (started the ph.d program in physics) often forces me
> to say what needs to be said in the shortest possible time then move on.
> Thus if I have in my previous posting conveyed the image of being
> anti-analytical that would be an unfortunate one. Far from being
> anti-analytical, I champion the human intellect for being capable of
> addressing and ultimately finding solutions to the problems of humanity.
> However, I do also hold in high esteem 'action'. I do value human
> warmth, and generosity of spirit (i.e. matters pertaining to the heart
> far removed from the intellect) all of which at the end of the day are
> major contributors to human social organizing tendencies.
> By the way, let us not forget who actually lives in our communities? Are
> they not the very individuals that populte gambia-l? It is unfortunate
> though that most of them while actively following the debates prefer to
> reserve their analytically structured views and share them only when we
> meet in informat social gatherings. i.e. in the 'kampekaays', the
> 'kabudus', ... Perhaps this may have led some to assume that only
> half-baked ideas and analysis goes on within our communities.
>
> In celebration of Gambian Independence Anniversary -
> LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE - WASHINGTON D.C.
> Tentative Conference Date: Sat. Feb. 21
> Tentative Location: Howard University Campus
> Evening Event: Cultural Gala Night (organized by the GPA)
> Featuring Sabar (Sing Sing Rhythm), Baati Linguere Choral
> Group of Atlanta, Gambian DJ Rhythm King Shakie, Wolof Rap Artist Karim
> Wagan, and much more ...
>
> I shall be contacting this weekend all those who either sent me mail or
> called or spoke to me in persond. Will keep the rest of the gambia-l
> family posted.
>
> Best regards,
> LatJor
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 10:04:01 EST
From: BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: query: Kompins
Message-ID: <3c14d48e.34cb5463@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Jobst:

In a message dated 98-01-25 08:21:43 EST, you wrote:

<< hello,
could anybody please advise me on how to translate the expression
"Kompin" or explain to me what a Yahya-Kompin is? I would be very
greatful.

Jobst >>


Kompin means a committee or club (mostly social). Yaayi-Kompin is the
chairwoman of the club or committee.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Traditionally, almost all the Kompins would have a
Papa: A male honorary chairman who is invited to the Kompin's annual/important
functions. He may also serve as a consultant on important matters affecting
the Kompin.

My question to List Members who recently came from The Gambia is: Are Kompins
still going strong?

Thanks!

Awa Sey



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 12:01:49 -0800
From: "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Cc: <BAKSAWA@oal.com>
Subject: Re: Joke
Message-ID: <199801251801.MAA00515@mailhost.cyberramp.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Awa:
What a pleasure indeed to catch you on the line.
Wasn't that joke about the politician hilarious?
You know in those days the English language was still in it's rugged form.
Not quite as evolved as it is today.
So, arguably, in the contex of the times, he might have been right by
responding " The same to you."
David letterman or Jay leno should get a hold of this one.
Only I wouldn't tell them the politician was a African.

On a different note,
How is all in Maine?

Morro Krubally

----------
> From: BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: Joke
> Date: Saturday, January 24, 1998 5:42 PM
>
>
> Sillah:
>
> In a message dated 98-01-23 23:32:39 EST, you wrote:
>
> << One day he lost a dear relative. As usual, a delegation of of the
House
> >of Parliament was at his house to attend the burial and to extend their

> >condolences. When any of those members told him, " Accept my sympathy "

> >he in reply told them " I wish you the same" unknowingly. Quite
> >interesting but these were old time politicians. What should he have
> >said in reply? >>
>
> I think it was quite logical for him to respond "thanks for your support"
or
> just a simple "thanks" (especially if he was not confident with his
command of
> the English language!).
>
> That was a very funny joke. It is nice to have something to laugh about
once
> in a while!!
>
> Awa Sey

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 18:57:05 -0000
From: "foroyaa@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: An alternative strategy for macro-economic development (A vision without a realistic foundation is a castle built in thin air)
Message-ID: <B0000042705@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Foroyaa" <foroyaa@commit.gm>
via Commit


AN ALTERNATIVE STRATEGY FOR MACRO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

A Vision Without a Realistic Foundation Is A castle Built On Thin Air

(Letter to the Secretary of State for Finance and Economic Affairs on the
1998 Budget signed by HALIFA SALLAH)


The debate on the 1998 budget by members of the National Assembly is
history. However, the issues raised during the debate cannot be buried in
the grave yards of our minds. The reason for this is simple.

The decisions made on how to run the affairs of the country in 1998 are
likely to add something to or delete something from the lives of the
people. Therefore, what is required now is to shift the debate from the
confines of the National Assembly and stage it in the theatre of our public
life. This is precisely the objective of this letter.

It is important to point out in passing that it accords with the dictates
of sound reasoning that people placed in positions of public trust should
have deep interest in ensuring a comprehensive analysis of issues of
fundamental importance in order to formulate realistic and desirable
policies whose implementation could provide appropriate response to the
vital concerns of our times and circumstances. Such sound analysis in the
area of public finance requires more than common sense economics which many
resorted to during the debate in the National Assembly. It requires
intellectual honesty on the part of decision makers and their fidelity to
propositions that are fully grounded on irrefutable premises.

It is, of course, admissible that when a debate opens and the facts are
left hanging on a balance, while they are being debated, the contending
views should neither be lightly accepted nor lightly dismissed. This state
of equilibrium is, however, not permanent. It is undone once the proven
weight of certain arguments impose themselves with overwhelming
decisiveness on the contending view. At that point, one chooses to ignore
such ideas only to one's intellectual detriment.

Truth is a rock and those who combat it are totally left incapacitated and
ineffective in shaping the destiny of peoples and countries.

To proceed, I am compelled to register my dissatisfaction that you chose to
dismiss very concrete proposals as very light rhetorics during your
response to the contributions made by given members of the National
Assembly without giving proper thought to their inherent weight. This
misnomer, which is generally applied to our reasoning when one takes a
partisan, instead of a scientific posture, often bars a person from
considering reasonably balanced arguments which may engender viable
solutions to concrete problems.

You would agree with me that rhetoric is the tendency to dwell on trivial
matters just to avoid facing the central point at issue.

The purpose of this intervention is to digress from trivialities and focus
on the concrete economic picture you have mapped out in your budget speech
with the view to point out the discrepancy between the imagined weight you
assigned to your argument to warrant your deduction that 1998 "is set to be
an era full of promise", and its real weight when gauged on the balance of
objective analysis.

In this way, the discerning observer would be able to know which argument
would justifiably be dubbed rhetoric.

Now, allow me to proceed to the analysis.

The first point to note is that after supporting D26,000 per month for the
President; D16,000 for the Vice President; D13,000 for Secretaries of
State; D8000 for the Minority Leader; D11,000 for the Majority Leader, if
elected, and D7000 for National Assembly members, many members of the
National Assembly members called for salary increases for those at the
lower ranks of the public service.

The fact of the matter, however, is that government does not even have
enough money to meet its public expenditure for the 1998 financial year.
The estimates you presented to the members of the National Assembly reveal
that for the fiscal year 1996/97 the revenue derived mainly from taxes
amounted to D782,722,296 while the actual expenditure was D1,348,255,000.
This leaves a deficit of D565,532,704. If we rely on the other figures
given in your estimates as expenditure for 1996/97, that is, D972,609,966,
the deficit would amount to D189,887,670. For 1998, revenue is estimated at
D961,655,989 while expenditure is estimated at D1,489,162,000. This leaves
a deficit of D527,506,011 for 1998. If we rely on the other figures given
in your estimates as expenditure for 1998, that is, D1,072,989,070, the
deficit would amount to D111,333,081.

One may now ask: How do you intend to deal with the deficit in order to
create a surplus to increase salaries?

Those who made recommendation for salary increases did not say a word on
this issue. What do you call remarks which call for salary increases
without making concrete proposals on how to eradicate budget deficits? I
will leave you to give a reply. I am, however, convinced that if you were
to devote high grade reasoning on the issue, your description will not fall
short of using the word 'rhetoric'.

Furthermore, one may ask: How has the government been dealing with its
deficits? The answer is simple. It has been borrowing and begging and has
been receiving loans and grants way before the Economic Recovery Programme
(ERP) came into being in 1985 to date. This borrowing has been from
internal and external sources. The borrowing is so huge that you have
indicated that we are to pay D439 million out of a budget of D934.7 million
as debt service charges. You have also indicated that "outstanding stock of
domestic debt at the end of October, 1997 is D806 million, a 32% increase
over last year".

All Gambians do hear advertisements of Treasury Bills which provide funds
for the government, but also require huge payment of interest. This is why
you have indicated that between 1993/94 and 1996/97 "Domestic interest
payments doubled during the period from D79.2 million to D164.7 million."

According to you, this interest payment is "necessitating more than desired
increased government borrowing from the banking system, thereby further
contributing to the widening of the budget deficit, ushering in a vicious
cycle." These are your own words which have accurately reflected our
position in our book published in 1992 entitled ANALYSIS OF THE
INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL ECONOMIES.

Hence, if we stay within the realm of analytical economics, we will not
fail to agree that The Gambia is faced with a deficit and debt crises. How
then are these two crises to be addressed? This is the question that all
Gambians should ask all those who seek to lead this country. The answers
they give to this question determines those who have real solutions to the
problems of the country and those who are just engaged in rhetoric.

Let us now examine where the government is taking the country.

You have indicated that the 1998 estimates for 1998 put the development
budget at D305 million. D55 million is supposed to be from grants. D40
million is supposed to be from Gambia's local funds. The loan component is
put at D210 million or 60% of the development budget. This confirms that
even though the country is already terribly indebted, one can see that the
size of the loan component of the budget spells more indebtedness in the
future.

What is rather tragic, Mr. Secretary of State, is that even the Majority
Leader in the National Assembly is oblivious to the dangers of the debt
trap because of increasing dependence on loans for most of our development
projects. In defending the huge expenditure on foreign travels, he implied
that the President can travel as much as he wishes as long as what is
brought is more than what is spent. He failed to realise that what is spent
is the solid money of the Gambian people and what is brought back are loans
which have to be paid with interest. In short, the most desirable strategy
for sustainable development is one where we utilise our resources more and
take less loans to finance development projects. This is the only way to
come out of the debt trap.

The question now arises: How can we expand our local contribution to the
development budget in the face of budget deficits?

PDOIS calls for financial discipline. It calls for the eradication of all
forms of extravagance among the leadership and practice thrift in
expenditure in order to eradicate the budget deficit without high increase
in taxation. Reducing the cost of foreign travels of the President by
taking normal flights and cutting on entourage and imprests would be one
way of imposing progressive measures to eradicate the budget deficits
instead of retrenching public servants and reducing expenditure on services
or the increase in taxes and the introduction of cost recovery for
services.

Of course, a person who has applied a high grade of mental energy in
following the arguments may be quick to say that even if it is possible to
eradicate the deficit by eliminating extravagance and ensuring financial
discipline, a distinct possibility exists that such measures will not be
sufficient to create a surplus for development expenditure and thus reduce
the loan component. A tax based economy cannot sustain recurrent and
development expenditure without incurring deficits and loans. The higher
the spending, the higher the loan component and the greater the
indebtedness.

We maintain that it is wishful thinking to expect the private sector to
generate enough tax revenue to enable government to eradicate its deficits
and have surplus to increase spending on development projects.

Abundant facts reveal that your entire budgetary mechanism is rooted in
structural arrangements which, for over 30 years, have not been able to
generate enough revenue to meet the recurrent and development needs of the
country.

This calls for major alterations in economic policy. The alterations must
be rooted in a systematic evaluation of what is made possible by our
concrete realities. We must be determined to rely on facts and not dogma to
discover the optimal solutions to our socio-economic problems.

Hence, the issue is not whether one is committed to a private sector led
growth or public sector led growth. The issue is the question of finding an
alternative policy that could provide appropriate solutions to our deficits
and indebtedness.

In short, development does not proceed according to whims and designs, no
matter how noble; on the contrary, they proceed according to the dictates
of objective reality which we can shape only if we understand their nature
and characteristics. This imposes a burden on policy makers to study the
concrete realities of their countries and work out appropriate policies.

Now one may ask: What alternative does PDOIS propose?

PDOIS has given example of how leaders should be able to sacrifice to
ensure that the deficit is contained by Sidia Jatta rejecting the D7000
provided to National Assembly members and proposing to take D1500 as salary
and D1000 as allowance for transportation, etc. The rest of the sum is to
be put into a WULI FUND to be managed by the representatives of the people
in Wuli.

Furthermore, PDOIS has given example of how the Assets Management and
Recovery Corporation (AMRC) could be transformed into an investment bank.
Public corporations could deposit what they accumulate in such a bank and
thus facilitate investment in fisheries, construction, light scale
industries in processing cotton, milk, leather, grains, fruits and
vegetables for consumption. This will generate employment and income to
sustain social services and development projects on a more sustainable
basis.

Of course, such a proposition does raise interesting issues for those
technocrats who lack critical thinking. For example, they do say that
public corporations cannot be efficient because the employees do not take
them as their own. Let us now ask: Which major private company is run
without employing workers and managers, who do not own the company, to run
it? An efficient government must have an efficient system of management.

Additionally, public funds can be invested to set up cooperatives for
farmers, those in the fishing sector, artisans, carpenters, masons, etc.
This production and marketing cooperatives will enhance the earning
capacity of its members, generate employment, provide funds for social
services and expand production and marketing.

Mr. Secretary of State, a distinct possibility exists for this country to
carry its way in the world with diminishing loans and expansion of national
output. We have about 300,000 heads of cattle, 250,000 goats, 200,000
sheep, 740,000 chicken. We can produce 80,000 metric tonnes of fish while
we produce only 30,000. We can produce all the grain we need. We need
14,174 metric tonnes of food which we can produce, but 31.7% of our import
bill is for food.

Our strategy is, therefore, clear. Cut the sweets of high office and use
public money to build public corporations and cooperatives to expand
production, employment, income and services.

Alternatively, your plan is to transform The Gambia into a middle income
country where people earn on the average D20,000 by relying on private
investment which have not come in sufficient quantity for over 30 years.
Who then is engaged in wishful thinking and rhetoric?

You are running a trade deficit amounting to D2528 million for 1996 with
imports amounting to D2737 million while exports stood at D209 million. The
trade deficit for 1997 amounts to D1616 million with imports amounting to
D1773 million while exports shrank to D157 million. Where is the basis for
your talk about 1998 to be a year full of promises? Who is really engaged
in rhetoric?

You talked about the need to increase the salaries of low income earners
while you face a deficit of D527,506,011. We assert that there should be a
cut down on expenditure, on foreign travels, sacrifice by the leadership in
accepting lower incomes and less privileges so that we can eradicate the
deficit. Who then is really engaged in rhetoric?

Mr Secretary of State, Gambians are now capable of critical thinking. They
need leaders who are innovators, not those who are imitators. You would
recall that until recently the whole world saw the Tiger States as a model
for development for our brand of countries.

We relied on scientific analysis to indicate in our book entitled ANALYSIS
OF THE INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL ECONOMIES published in 1992 that the
economies of the so-called Tiger States were based on drug money,
counterfeit, gambling and speculations in the currency markets; that sooner
or later paper money will so exceed the production base of the economy that
their money will become worthless.

In subsequent articles, we argued that the Tiger States were becoming
"***** cats". We can give you all those articles which preceded the present
crisis of the Tiger States to confirm that we have been proven correct.
Leadership means foresight.

To conclude, allow me to say that it is universally recognised that the
structural adjustment your government has faith in has been proven to be
unworkable. Fresh thinking is needed. Critical thinkers are needed in this
generation, which has no mercy for the unthinking. We need policy makers
who are not indoctrinated by left or right dogmas, but are open minded,
willing to debate issues and appreciate positions that are backed by
irrefutable evidence!

History calls on all intellectuals in The Gambia to make it their duty to
search for the truth and enlighten their people.

All political parties need to enter into a debate on the economy to
enlighten the people. We had invited you to a debate on the economy. The
invitation still stands.

One thing is very clear. It is a crime to mislead the people. History shall
indict those who mislead the people. Time shall be the prosecutor. This is
the verdict of history and it is irrevocable.


HALIFA SALLAH.


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 15:22:59 EST
From: TSaidy1050 <TSaidy1050@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: conference
Message-ID: <6f10a5a9.34cb9f25@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Gambia-l,

It is a good idea to have a leadership conference and I will encourage all who
could go to attend. The maxim 'United we stand and divided we fall' almost
manifested it self during the last ALD (African Liberation Day) in Washington
DC. If I remember correctly, this is first of such conference and I think it
is a good sign and should be well attended..

The unfortunate thing, I hate to predict this, the turnout for the conference
would be very low and the Cultural Gala Night will be jam-packed. This used to
be the case during the ALD symposia organised over the years. The ALD is fast
approaching and if all Gambian organisations in the Greater DC area could
unite, a lot of funds would be raised.

Latjor and the others keep up the good work and continue your endless efforts
for the success of this conference. We would like to read the report of the
out come.

PEACE

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 17:00:41 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu
Subject: Re: An alternative strategy for macro-economic development (A vision without a realistic foundation is a castle built in thin air)
Message-ID: <199801252200.RAA05139@oak.ffr.mtu.edu>

My thanks to the Foroyaa team for forwarding this article to the list although I can not comment until I read it all.

keep up the good work down there!!

Malanding Jaiteh

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:19:30 +1200
From: Saikou B M Njai <sbn13@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: mail overload?
Message-ID: <A9097C1D85@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>

Please send all my future mail to from the list to
Fantamadi@hotmail.com.
My present address for only personal mail

> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 15:59:20 -0800 (PST)
> From: latjor ndow <latjor@hotmail.com>
> Subject: mail overload?
> To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List"
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Reply-to: gambia-l@u.washington.edu

> Greetings:
>
> I wish to share with the list a way to ease the burden of mails you may
> be receiving from gambia-l and elsewhere into your private account. I
> have found it quite useful these past two months to use the 'free mail'
> services that are on the 'net' such as hotmail for mails from discussion
> groups like this one.
> This way my personal account with my ISP is not overwhelmed with mails.
> Some gambia-lers are already doing this but most are not aware of it.
> Due to the complaints I have received from members complaining of
> receiving too many mails (often resulting in their unsubscribing from
> the list), I think this could alleviate some of our woes.
> Anyone with full access to the worldwide web can point their browser to:
> http://www.hotmail.com and sign on. You do not have to provide them with
> any information you do not wish to reveal (or you may just do what I do,
> give them some bogus info. and then not sign on to anything else.). You
> can then request from the list managers that all your mails be sent to
> that address, thus freeing up your other account. You can read our mails
> at your leisure and delete mails at your own convenience without having
> some System Administrator breathing over your neck complaining that you
> have too many mails (esp. for those of us who have access from a
> college.) Bookmark the site for future convenience.
> One note though. As we all know, ain't nothing free. The trade off is
> that the company, (hotmail in this case) would be flashing ads at the
> bottom of your screen. If you think that is not a big deal,(you get
> thousands of these daily anyway) then go for it. This is just a
> suggestion.
>
> LatJor
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
Saikou B M Njai
Postgraduate Student Room E311
Department of Civil Engineering
University of Canterbury
P M B 4800
Christchurch,N Z

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 20:10:38 PST
From: "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri
Message-ID: <19980126041040.29988.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Hi Awa Sey,

Selamat Hari raya to you. It is unfortunate that I don,t have any
information as to when those countries will have their Laila tul Qadr.
But for Malaysia, to your biggest surprise had theirs on the 17th night
of the Ramadan which was on Jan 16. Malaysia always have their laila tul
Qadr on the 17th night of the ramadan. I understood that The Gambia was
to celebrate theirs yesterday Jan 25.

Regards,

Sillah.
>From gambia-l-owner@u.washington.edu Sat Jan 24 17:32:30 1998
>Received: from host (lists.u.washington.edu [140.142.56.13])
> by lists2.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
SMTP
> id RAA20993; Sat, 24 Jan 1998 17:32:25 -0800
>Received: from mx4.u.washington.edu (mx4.u.washington.edu
[140.142.33.5])
> by lists.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
ESMTP
> id RAA11114 for <gambia-l@lists.u.washington.edu>; Sat, 24 Jan 1998
17:32:13 -0800
>Received: from imo18.mx.aol.com (imo18.mx.aol.com [198.81.19.175])
> by mx4.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.09) with
ESMTP
> id RAA07056 for <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>; Sat, 24 Jan 1998
17:32:09 -0800
>Message-Id: <4f3bba09.34ca95bb@aol.com>
>Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 20:30:33 EST
>Reply-To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
>Sender: GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu
>Precedence: bulk
>From: BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@AOL.COM>
>To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
>Subject: Re: Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri
>Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
>X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 beta -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
>
>Mr. Conateh:
>
>In a message dated 98-01-23 21:53:01 EST, you wrote:
>
><< Hi Members,
>
><Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri ( A Happy Aidul Fitri ) to all of you in
><advance. >>
>
>
>Happy Eid to you as well.
>
>It is my understanding that Laila Tul Hadr (Kitim) is on Tuesday,
1/27/98 in
>the Middle East. Does this mean it will be on Wednesday, 1/28/98, in
the
>U.S.A? Input/information on this subect will be highly appreciated
from
>anyone on the List.
>
>Wishing everyone a nice weekend.
>
>Awa Sey
>
>
>
>


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 00:25:21 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Email Update
Message-ID: <9801260525.AA50956@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Balamusa wrote:

> yeah right. If you really think the packers are going to defeat the broncos,
> you are dreaming buddy. The packers may be better than the broncos, but watch
> them choke this weekend. Don't forget that the best doesn't always win. This
> is the year for John Elway and the broncos and nothing is going to stop them
> from becoming world champions. Peace and love to all you Gambia-lers!
> Balamusa Ceesay!!!!!

Balamusa,

As I struggle to find words, I must simply say, disappointedly of course,
GO BRONCOS! The Packers played like underdogs right after the first touch
down. From then on, Broncos did excatly what you said they would do -
"choke" the Packers. I have never seen them (the Packers) feel so
unconfident and sloppy in both their offensive and defensive plays. In my
tantalizing statements (just jiving of course), I could have simply added
(or said), MAY THE BETTER TEAM WIN. Sure enough "old man" Elway did just
that. I hope that Keretha Cash will not hesitate to join me in
congratulating the Broncos for their (undeniably) great perfomance in
what, In my opinion, is one their best performance this season.

Perhaps, this outcome will psyche Dan Marino and the Dolphins (BTW, that's
the team I may be going with next season) to compete vigorously for the
championship next year.

CONGRATULATIONS BRONCOS FOR BEATING ALL THE ODDS!!!!!!!!!!!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

=======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 22:06:51 PST
From: "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Part 3 cont
Message-ID: <19980126060653.8680.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Dear Father Mous,

I have been eagerly waiting for the conclusions of your most wonderful
and objective analyses of the present situations in The Gambia. I must
say you have done a wonderful and an enviable job. So thank you for a
work well done. I agree with your analyses and do feel that the present
regime will work all way out to ensure that the mistakes which
characterised the former regime are not repeated. Abuse of human rights,
endless corruption, abuse of authority, just to mention few should
become things of the past. We therefore encourage those people who can
relay these messages to His Excel. Mr. Jammeh to do so. A good leader is
one who listens to the voices of his people and I believe that President
Jammeh will become an enviable leader in Africa if he values these
things. Then this will make The Gambia the pride of Africa.

So once again, bravo Mous and all those people who have contributed
their ideas on this pertinent topic of the month. Mous on this note, I
am glad to bestow this title to you " MAN OF THE MONTH OF JANUARY '98"
for your wonderful, brilliant and mature handling of " IS IT A NEW
GAMBIA "

Regards to all.

Sillah.



>From gambia-l-owner@u.washington.edu Sat Jan 24 00:04:51 1998
>Received: from host (lists.u.washington.edu [140.142.56.13])
> by lists3.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
SMTP
> id XAA27986; Fri, 23 Jan 1998 23:19:21 -0800
>Received: from mx3.u.washington.edu (mx3.u.washington.edu
[140.142.13.230])
> by lists.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
ESMTP
> id XAA51584 for <gambia-l@lists.u.washington.edu>; Fri, 23 Jan 1998
23:19:03 -0800
>Received: from imo11.mx.aol.com (imo11.mx.aol.com [198.81.19.165])
> by mx3.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.09) with
ESMTP
> id XAA14346 for <Gambia-l@u.washington.edu>; Fri, 23 Jan 1998
23:19:00 -0800
>Received: from JENGFANNEH@aol.com
> by imo11.mx.aol.com (IMOv12/Dec1997) id OTGVa21759
> for <Gambia-l@u.washington.edu>; Sat, 24 Jan 1998 02:18:33 -0500 (EST)
>Message-Id: <a0b9f03a.34c995ca@aol.com>
>Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 02:18:33 EST
>Reply-To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
>Sender: GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu
>Precedence: bulk
>From: JENGFANNEH@aol.com
>To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
>Subject: Part 3 cont
>Mime-Version: 1.0
>Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
>X-To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
>X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 beta -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
>
>The system of governance needs to have these features:
>
> A. Create a justice system compleely independent and so
powerful
>that no individual or organization can control, influence or
manipulate. By
>virtue of its power and independence all rights of every citizen is
protected,
>especially minority opinions.
> B. Revolutionized and developed a powerful media, completely
>independent from government control. Media institution like TV
stations, print
>and radio should not in any way be another extended arm of the central
>government.
>
> C. The system should allowed minority views, the Opposition
should
>not be viewed with resentment , social outcast or even becoming an
impediment
>to their career or survival.
>
>Finally, It is interesting to note that most poor under-developed
countries do
>not have the above features in their system of governance. For instance
a
>country like Nigeria do have quite a few infrastructural programs and
are
>still hoping that it would have a positve impact to their economic
>development, but without a fair, honest and open system of governance,
>generations of generations are going to face the realities of
disappointments
>upon disappointments. In the case of the Gambia, The New Leadership has
>initiated different projects, an impressive modern Airport, A New TV
station,
>High Schools in the provinces, major Hospital in the provinces and
other
>series of programs which are all vital on the path to socio-economic
>development. But unless the New Leadership takes a bold initiative and
seek
>for a political solution through having an unshakable, fair system of
>governance, and there is going to be a tremendous amount of risk
involve, all
>these projects are going to be counter productive and would be
eventually
>destroyed. And our sons and daughters of the next generation would be
in the
>same dilemma we are in today. Mr. Jawara and his generation were never
capable
>of building a foundation of justice, honesty and liberty for all
Gambians and
>eventually they fell; therefore you take a risk a search for a
political
>solution because we definitely do not want to be another Sierra Leone,
Rwanda
>or even Nigeria for that matter.
>
>Guys, these two weeks visit to the Gambia was very interesting, and
there is
>definitely a New Gambia, but like I said with a twist. Thank you all
your time
>
>Musa Jeng
>


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:33:58 -0000
From: "janko.fofana@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Is it a new Gambia?
Message-ID: <B0000042980@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Janko Fofana" <janko.fofana@commit.gm>
via Commit


I would like to thank all those who contribute to this forum and would like
to encourage everybody to share ideas on topics that are of national
interest. It is important for us in the Gambia or outside to be kept
informed of issues affecting our nation. It is always nice to hear
something about your country especially if you live outside of it. I
remember my student days in the US when I was on the List and always eager
to browse through to see anything new about the Gambia. I am sure some of
you are now like me eager all the time to get information about politics,
economics or social development in the country.

Since I am now back, I want to put in a small contribution to the topic "Is
it a new Gambia? Sincerely speaking there is a lot of development going on
in the country since the military take over but does that warrant it to be
called a "New Gambia"? In my view certainly not. Development is an ongoing
process and some of what are being implemented today were plans already
underway during the past regime. Don't get me wrong. I give the credit to
the present government for implementing long overdue projects like the TV,
The North Bank Road (Barra - Kerewan with a bridge at Kerewan under
construction) etc but evidently much was also done after independence in
1965. It will be unfair to completely ignore what has been accomplished,
small as it look to some people. We just need to push things at a quicker
pace as is being done at the moment. Again I want to say that the present
government is doing a lot of good work but I strongly believe we need to
revisit some of the priority areas (if they are priorities for the
government). Think of all the schools built since the 1994 take over -
primary, junior and secondary schools in amost every corner in the country.
Do we have furniture and teachers for these schools? It might not be a bad
idea to improve some of the schools - better teachers, furniture and much
needed text books - and have few additional high schools rather than giving
every village a primary school. Of course education is important but what
is more important is what you get from your investment in education. Are we
getting our children better educated or just providing schools for them
where the quality of their education can be compromised? What are we doing
to help our school dropouts and those who graduate without any job
opportunity? More skills centers and needed, though it can be argued
government is thinking along those lines but it is my opinion more needs to
be done. I am happy about the idea of the members to contribute through
the educational assistance to needy students as being discussed.

Finally, I believe the General Hospital in Farafenni, the new Airport
Terminal, improvement in road network in the rural areas are but few of the
achievement of the present regime that they should be given some credit
for. However, we need to think of making good use of these facilities and
make them sustainable. A lot of money was invested in these projects and
government should ensure that they don't lie idle. More development
projects are being discussed as revealed during the President's meet the
people's tour last November and it appears the government has already
secured funding for most of the projects. I will keep you posted on some
developments as they unfold.

Also remember that our financial year is now from January to December and a
lot of things are being adjusted to match the calendar year. So I believe
we have to continue with our efforts and don't think that it is a new
Gambia. The key here is sustainability! Development is an ongoing process
and we still have a long way to go. It is a collective responsibilty and we
all have a role to play whether at home or abroad but better to be here to
paddle the canoe with us. Your role there is also important as most if not
all of you are on a mission there. Good luck to all of you and welcome
onboard when the mission is accomplished.

So much for now. Sorry for giving you so much to read but I hope it is a
small contribution.

Janko Fofana







------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 16:13:23 GMT+1
From: "Heidi Skramstad" <heidis@amadeus.cmi.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: sutura and other wolof words
Message-ID: <13A02D5E2602@amadeus.cmi.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Hello,
I am wondering if anybody can help translating or explaining some, for me, "difficult"
Wolof words, namely sutura, teranga and ruus. (Do they have Mandinka
counterparts?)

Sutura:
Depending on context, the word has been explained to me as secrecy,
privacy, cover and a kind of respect.

In a "jebale" (transfer of the bride) the bride was given the advice
that "Nanga am sutura ni sa muruai bi amee sutura" (You should have sutura
as your "cover" has "sutura")

In another context a woman praised living in Bakau and said "Bakau
moi suma sutura" (Bakau is my "sutura")

Can somebody explain a bit more what this implies?

Teranga is the other "difficult" word, which I interprete first and
formost as hospitality or as treat. In some contexts it is almost
generousity, in others it is translated as respect. Receptions (like
when people come from Mekka) are referred to as "teranga".
So it may be both a kind of occasion, something one can give or show
"meie/woon teranga", or be a quality of a person, a country etc.
("Senegal reo teranga la" - according to Ismaila Lo, I believe that
applies to the Gambia as well!) ???

The third is "ruus". I have been taught that "Gumbe du ruus" because,
as "Ruus" is in the eyes. What exactly does it mean?
Is it shyness or shame? When people say that they avoid to see
somebody because: "damma ko ruus" I have interpreted that as they
are shy (because they respect or fear? somebody??). But I believe
ruus in some contexs means shame "warr nga ruus!" (You should
feel ashamed?)

Respect seems to be a main topic, frequently related to all these
other words. In Norway a person who "has respect" is a respected
person, in Gambia a person who "has respect" is somebody who is
respectful, gives respect. While "horomo" in Mandinka, as far as I
have understood is respect, there is no single Wolof word which can
be directly translated to respect (?). But so many words are translated
to "respect" like "mingi mei ma teranga, woonul ma xammadi" was
translated to me: "he gave me respect, never showed me disrespect".
And somebody who "nyaka faida" or "nyaka joom" are respectless (??).

I am wondering if "respect" in English or in Norwegian is used in a
different way here than in the Gambia? At least it is probably less
explicit in the upbringing/training of children. When I asked what
was the most important thing newly circumcised children were taught, almost
everybody said respect, to respect other people and oneself, and
especially elders. Also when I asked somebody what they were taught
at the daara, they said that apart from pray, read the Koran and
make ablution, they learnt to respect other people.

I hope some of you will have time to share your thoughts on the
subject, in spite of the busy time schedules everybody seems to have.

Thanks.

Heidi Skramstad





------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 10:35:34 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Dumping on the developing world (fw)
Message-ID: <34CCAD46.2F0A@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> The silent war on harzadous dumping of waste material: Is it a war we can
> win? I would like to hope so.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> **************************************************************************
> > Environmental Research Foundation
> > P.O. Box 5036, Annapolis, MD 21403
> > Fax (410) 263-8944; Internet: erf@igc.apc.org
> > ==========
> > The Back issues and Index are available here.
> > The official RACHEL archive is here. It's updated constantly.
> > To subscribe, send E-mail to rachel- weekly- request@world.std.com
> > with the single word SUBSCRIBE in the message. It's free.
> **************************************************************************
> >
> > DUMPING ON THE DEVELOPING WORLD.
> >
> > American industry is desperately seeking places to dump
> > hazardous waste and household garbage. A reporter for the
> > CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR'S bureau in Sydney,
> > Australia, phoned recently to inquire what we knew about the
> > toxicity of leachate from municipal dumps. (We faxed him
> > RHWN #90, "Leachate from Municipal Dumps has Same
> > Toxicity as Leachate from Hazardous Waste Dumps."). He
> > was investigating a promoter named Dan Fleming, who is angling
> > to sign a contract with natives of the Marshall Islands, where Mr.
> > Fleming hopes to dump 10% of all the household garbage
> > produced on the U.S. West Coast. Mr. Fleming says his scheme
> > will "create new land" in the Marshalls. Mr. Fleming says if the
> > Marshalls don't increase their altitude by heaping on the garbage,
> > they'll disappear beneath the sea, victims of the greenhouse
> > effect.
> >
> > The last time the U.S. undertook largescale experiments in the
> > Marshalls, it had ill effects on the land: we tested the H-bomb on
> > Bikini atoll, which promptly disappeared, leaving behind a legacy
> > of cancer and misery that the Marshall Islanders (and many
> > unsuspecting U.S. Navy men) are still enduring. So far as we
> > know, the only environmental group tracking this latest scam is
> > Greenpeace; they wrote about it in GREENPEACE MAGAZINE
> > March/April, 1989, pg. 5. The magazine is yours six times a
> > year for a donation of $20 to Greenpeace, 1436 U Street,
> > NW, Washington, DC 20009.
> >
> > As the price of hazardous waste disposal in the "civilized world"
> > is approaching $2500 per ton in some areas, a new "profession"
> > has emerged: international "waste merchants," who arrange to
> > dump the stuff in third world countries. In the last two years,
> > Africa has emerged as the favored target. Consider these facts:
> > In March, 1988, a Norwegian ship dumped 15,000 tons of
> > material labeled "raw material for bricks" in a quarry on Kassa
> > Island, off the mainland capital of Conakry, Guinea. Guinea is a
> > small west-African country bordered by Sierra Leone, Liberia
> > and Mali. In June, Guinea newspapers reported that vegetation
> > on the island was drying up and dying. Investigations revealed
> > that the "raw material for bricks" was toxic incinerator ash from
> > Philadelphia's now-infamous garbage burners. Norway's Honorary
> > Consul, Mr. Sigmund Stromme, was arrested and charged with
> > forging documents in order to bring in the shipment; Mr. Stromme
> > turned out to be a principal in Guinomar, the company that had a
> > contract to bring in a total of 85,000 tons of Philadelphia's ash. By
> > July the original shipment had been removed from Kassa.
> >
> > On February 9, 1989, Guinea-Bissau, a west-African neighbor of
> > Guinea, signed a five-year contract with two British companies to
> > receive 15 million tons of tanning and pharmaceutical wastes for a
> > payment of $600 million ($40 per ton). The wastes would come
> > from U.S. and European firms. (This contract has since been
> > canceled due to unfavorable publicity.)
> >
> > An undetermined quantity of hazardous wastes from U.S. military
> > agencies was dumped in a phosphate mine pit in Zimbabwe
> > in southern Africa. The U.S. exporters responsible, Jack and
> > Charles Colbert, were sentenced in February, 1988, to 13 years'
> > imprisonment for fraudulent business practices.
> >
> > WEST AFRICA HOTLINE, a newsletter, reports that President
> > Bongo of Gabon (bordering Cameroon and the Congo) met
> > with representatives of the Denis Mining Company in 1987 and
> > agreed to take radioactive mine wastes from Colorado uranium
> > mines.
> >
> > A report in ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY,
> > a journal of the American Chemical Society, quotes Greenpeace
> > saying a Dutch shipping company signed a contract with the
> > government of the Congo (bordering Zaire and Cameroon) to deliver
> > a million tons of solvent, paint, pesticide sludge, and chemical wastes
> > from the U.S. and Europe between June, 1988, and May, 1989, for
> > a fee of $84 million ($84 per ton). Bad publicity subsequently queered
> > this deal too.
> >
> > President Kerekou of Benin, a tiny country sandwiched between
> > Nigeria and Togo, signed a contract in January, 1988, with a Gibralter
> > firm, Sesco, Ltd, agreeing that Benin will take up to five million tons
> > per year of non-nuclear industrial wastes from North America and
> > Europe. The price? Two dollars and fifty cents per ton.
> >
> > Nigeria has taken the lead in denouncing waste dumping in Africa.
> > At the Organization of African Unity (OAU) summit in May,
> > 1988, President Babangida of Nigeria said "No government, no
> > matter the financial inducement, has the right to mortgage the
> > destiny of future generations of African children."
> >
> > Ironically, within a week of President Babangida's speech, eight
> > Nigerian students living in Italy, reacting to reports in Italian
> > newspapers, alerted the Nigerian government to a scheme
> > involving collusion between Nigerian and Italian businessmen.
> > The men had shipped 3800 tons of hazardous wastes and stored
> > them in Koko, Nigeria. The chief Italian suspect escaped from
> > Nigeria June 2, but 15 Nigerians are awaiting trial. The
> > newspapers in Nigeria June 14 carried headlines, "Culprits may
> > face firing squad," and "Death penalty likely."
> >
> > African journalist Arti Vir, writing in ENVIRONMENTAL
> > SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (Vol. 23, March, 1989, pgs.
> > 23-25) summed it up:
> >
> > "...the demands by Nigeria and Guinea that foreign governments
> > remove illegally dumped hazardous materials from their
> > territories are warnings to industrial nations to keep waste
> > away from African shores." NIGERIA'S FIRING SQUADS
> > WILL PERHAPS CONVINCE WOULD-BE WASTE
> > MERCHANTS THAT AFRICA IS SERIOUS ABOUT
> > PROTECTING ITSELF FROM PREDATORY BUSINESSMEN.
> >
> > We have just scratched the surface here. This problem is
> > broad and deep and getting worse. However, there's a bright side:
> > the toxics campaigners in Greenpeace, led by Dave Rapoport,
> > are on this case in a major way. In January, 1989, Jim Vallette
> > published the fourth edition of his INTERNATIONAL
> > TRADE IN WASTES: A GREENPEACE INVENTORY
> > (144 pages of horror stories from all parts of the globe).
> > The INVENTORY, which is available in English, German,
> > French and Spanish editions, also contains policy statements
> > by various governments. In general, the "civilized" nations
> > want to "control" and "manage" the import and export of
> > toxics wastes to the developing world. For their part, the
> > developing nations, particularly those in Africa, favor a
> > total ban on the international waste trade. Togo's environment
> > minister, Yao Komlavi, sums up this view, saying, "If Africa
> > is not going to import toxic waste, what control do we need
> > on such imports?" Greenpeace is publishing a newsletter
> > called GREENPEACE WASTE TRADE UPDATE. With
> > the Natural Resources Defense Council, Greenpeace
> > has joined organizations in Malaysia and Kenya founding
> > Itwan, the International Toxic Waste Action Network,
> > working closely with the United Nations, pressing for
> > passage of the U.N.'s "global Convention on the
> > Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes.
> > "Once again, hats off to the toxics campaigners at
> > Greenpeace! Contact them at 1436 U Street, Nw,
> > Washington, Dc 207009; phone (202) 462-1177.."
> > --Peter Montague, Ph.D.

Moe
Dumping harzardous waste almost happened in the Gambia in 1983 near
Gungur. The same group that wanted to have our coins minted were
involved. I knew of it ( through a close friend of mine here in
Washington DC) and when the group visited Banjul to finalize the three
million dollar deal, I interviened by writing an letter to the
authorities in both local government and external affairs expressing my
concerns. The plan was to bury the liqiud waste (suspected to be
potentially dangerous if exposed in the atmosphere) in the ground at
least three hundred feet deep near kartong or Gungur and the Gambia
would be paid a hefty amount of money each year.
Fortunately it did not happen (as far as I know ) and they moved to
Guinea Bissau who were negotiating and needed the money badly. Only
Allah knows what happened afterwards.
These kinds of hazardous wastes do not surface until the drums start
leaking from rusting several years later.
I am glad some is looking out for our interest
Happy Eid (Koriteh) in advance
Habib Diab Ghanim
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 09:46:06 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Email Update
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988F1A@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

(Chuckle! Chuckle!) All during the game (especially the 2nd quarter
on) I knew I would have to eat "crow" on this one. And to tell you the
truth, I am really a North Carolina Panthers supporters but hey, I live
in Wisconsin and you must admit the Packers gave Denver a run for their
money -- it was tied most of the game!!!

In all honesty, I graciously congratulate the Broncos for their win! I
am happy for Elway! His team definitely stood up for him. However, if
the Packer defense hadn't had almost 100 pounds on the Broncos in 67
degree weather (they are from the "Frozen Tundra" you know), it probably
would have been a different story. And I am very happy no one was
injured this time.

Oh well, I totally felt it was a good game, very emotional and that
otherwise -- minus a couple of exceptions -- it boiled down to a battle
of wits between the coaches.

Congratulations Broncos and Bronco Fans!
PANTHERS AND PACKERS, there's always next year!

Now, on to basketball!!!

PEACE! Keretha
> ----------
> From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Sunday, January 25, 1998 11:25 PM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Re: Email Update
>
> Balamusa wrote:
>
> > yeah right. If you really think the packers are going to defeat the
> broncos,
> > you are dreaming buddy. The packers may be better than the broncos,
> but watch
> > them choke this weekend. Don't forget that the best doesn't always
> win. This
> > is the year for John Elway and the broncos and nothing is going to
> stop them
> > from becoming world champions. Peace and love to all you
> Gambia-lers!
> > Balamusa Ceesay!!!!!
>
> Balamusa,
>
> As I struggle to find words, I must simply say, disappointedly of
> course,
> GO BRONCOS! The Packers played like underdogs right after the first
> touch
> down. From then on, Broncos did excatly what you said they would do -
> "choke" the Packers. I have never seen them (the Packers) feel so
> unconfident and sloppy in both their offensive and defensive plays. In
> my
> tantalizing statements (just jiving of course), I could have simply
> added
> (or said), MAY THE BETTER TEAM WIN. Sure enough "old man" Elway did
> justthat. I hope that Keretha Cash will not hesitate to join me in
> congratulating the Broncos for their (undeniably) great perfomance in
> what, In my opinion, is one their best performance this season.
>
> Perhaps, this outcome will psyche Dan Marino and the Dolphins (BTW,
> that's the team I may be going with next season) to compete vigorously
> for the championship next year.
>
> CONGRATULATIONS BRONCOS FOR BEATING ALL THE ODDS!!!!!!!!!!!
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> ======================================================================
> =
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> -
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:06:59 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Dumping on the developing world (fwd)
Message-ID: <9801261607.AA53798@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Habib Ghanim, you wrote:

> Moe
> Dumping harzardous waste almost happened in the Gambia in 1983 near
> Gungur. The same group that wanted to have our coins minted were
> involved. I knew of it ( through a close friend of mine here in
> Washington DC) and when the group visited Banjul to finalize the three
> million dollar deal, I interviened by writing an letter to the
> authorities in both local government and external affairs expressing my
> concerns. The plan was to bury the liqiud waste (suspected to be
> potentially dangerous if exposed in the atmosphere) in the ground at
> least three hundred feet deep near kartong or Gungur and the Gambia
> would be paid a hefty amount of money each year.
> Fortunately it did not happen (as far as I know ) and they moved to
> Guinea Bissau who were negotiating and needed the money badly. Only
> Allah knows what happened afterwards.
> These kinds of hazardous wastes do not surface until the drums start
> leaking from rusting several years later.
> I am glad some is looking out for our interest
> Happy Eid (Koriteh) in advance
> Habib Diab Ghanim

Brother habib,

It's indeed a pleasure to hear from you again, and thank you for the
information above. Now that we are closer to the end of Ramadhan, I hope
that you will be active on the list again.

Happy Eid to you and the family.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:23:54 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re : Joke (again)
Message-ID: <9801261623.AA33660@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit


Mr. Jawara,

I'd seen this before. Though it may sound funny, I detected a bit of
sarcasm and disrespect in the Author's creativity. However, that's just a
personal opinion which may not even count. I wonder, though, how my son's
God-mother (and many of the good white people on this list) would perceive
this?

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow


> >
> > > A Poem Written by an African Shakespeare
> > >
> > > Dear white fella
> > > Couple things you should know
> > > When I born, I black
> > > When I grow up, I black
> > > When I go in sun, I black
> > > When I cold, I black
> > > When I scared, I black
> > > When I sick, I black
> > > And when I die, I still black.
> > >
> > > You white fella
> > > When you born, you pink
> > > When you grow up, you white
> > > When you go in sun, you red
> > > When you cold, you blue
> > > When you scared, you yellow
> > > When you sick, you green
> > > And when you die, you grey.
> > > And you have the cheek to call me colored?????
>
>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 10:38:01 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Re : Joke (again)
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988F1B@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

Maybe there is a little sarcasm involved; however, living tends to make
one a tad critical in perspective and if the shoe fits.....?

Peace and keep the lines of communication flowing.

Keretha

> ----------
> From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Monday, January 26, 1998 10:23 AM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Re : Joke (again)
>
>
> Mr. Jawara,
>
> I'd seen this before. Though it may sound funny, I detected a bit of
> sarcasm and disrespect in the Author's creativity. However, that's
> just a
> personal opinion which may not even count. I wonder, though, how my
> son's God-mother (and many of the good white people on this list)
> would perceive
> this?
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
>
> > >
> > > > A Poem Written by an African Shakespeare
> > > >
> > > > Dear white fella
> > > > Couple things you should know
> > > > When I born, I black
> > > > When I grow up, I black
> > > > When I go in sun, I black
> > > > When I cold, I black
> > > > When I scared, I black
> > > > When I sick, I black
> > > > And when I die, I still black.
> > > >
> > > > You white fella
> > > > When you born, you pink
> > > > When you grow up, you white
> > > > When you go in sun, you red
> > > > When you cold, you blue
> > > > When you scared, you yellow
> > > > When you sick, you green
> > > > And when you die, you grey.
> > > > And you have the cheek to call me colored?????
> >
> >
> >
> >
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:36:13 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Is it a new Gambia
Message-ID: <9801261636.AA47706@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Mr. Jeng,

I have finally finished reading your report. Thank you again for that
useful analysis of the situation back home. This should give those in the
diaspora (including myself) all the more reason to go home and survey the
situtation before deciding to finally go home for good. I think it is very
easy to pack a family, buy a one way ticket and board AIR AFRIQUE, but it
would be wiser to survey the situation firsthand jus like you did, which
is also what I hope and plan to do sometime in the near future.

BTW, any report on the business sector?

Thanks again.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
==========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 18:13:39 GMT+1
From: "Heidi Skramstad" <heidis@amadeus.cmi.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE: Re : Joke (again)
Message-ID: <13A22EB4629C@amadeus.cmi.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Moe and others,

> > personal opinion which may not even count. I wonder, though, how my
> > son's God-mother (and many of the good white people on this list)
> > would perceive
> > this?

As a "toubab" who have seen my self in the mirror under varying
circumstances, I think the poem was just to the point. Very
funny! I think nobody should take him/herself too seriously, then
there would have been no fun left!

Heidi Skramstad




------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:18:02 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri
Message-ID: <34CCC54A.ECD@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

sillah conateh wrote:
>
> Hi Members,
>
> Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri ( A Happy Aidul Fitri ) to all of you in
> advance. May it bring for us all the best of luck. Anyone who wants to
> learn this language, please come to Malaysia.
>
> Sillah Conateh.
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
Mr Sillah
I am interested in coming to Malaysia. please contact me on my private
email (not Gambia-l)Thanks
Habib diab Ghanim
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:21:39 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Re : Joke (again)
Message-ID: <9801261721.AA46154@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Keretha Cash, you wrote:

> Maybe there is a little sarcasm involved; however, living tends to make
> one a tad critical in perspective and if the shoe fits.....?
>
> Peace and keep the lines of communication flowing.
>
> Keretha

I hear you and thank you very much. Now, how about
some REAL Cash for me? :-)))))))))).

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:26:46 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: sutura and other wolof words
Message-ID: <199801261726.MAA15022@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Heidi, with your permission I would like to add another Mandinka word
to your list that is "Buu-nyaa" used to mean very much like "horomo"
as in "Ayaa Horoma aning ayaa Buu-nyaa". Note horomo when used in this
sense becomes "Horoma". I think I can safely say that "sutura" in
mandingka is "suturo". as in "Mo nyang ta suturo sotolaleh". perhaps very
much teh same as "sutura" in wollof.
Please don't ask me who gets it from who?

it is interesting that a few days ago a Senegalese colleague gave me
"sutura" as one of the many attributes of what can be truely African.
this was at a time when he was explaining Negritude- a term coined by Former
Senegalese President Leopold Sedat Senghore.

I think I will leave the challenge of elaborating on the meanings of these
words to experts before a give in my few bututs.

Bass would say: keep up the good work down there.

Malanding Jaiteh

>
> Hello,
> I am wondering if anybody can help translating or explaining some, for me, "difficult"
> Wolof words, namely sutura, teranga and ruus. (Do they have Mandinka
> counterparts?)
>
> Sutura:
> Depending on context, the word has been explained to me as secrecy,
> privacy, cover and a kind of respect.
>
> In a "jebale" (transfer of the bride) the bride was given the advice
> that "Nanga am sutura ni sa muruai bi amee sutura" (You should have sutura
> as your "cover" has "sutura")
>
> In another context a woman praised living in Bakau and said "Bakau
> moi suma sutura" (Bakau is my "sutura")
>
> Can somebody explain a bit more what this implies?
>
> Teranga is the other "difficult" word, which I interprete first and
> formost as hospitality or as treat. In some contexts it is almost
> generousity, in others it is translated as respect. Receptions (like
> when people come from Mekka) are referred to as "teranga".
> So it may be both a kind of occasion, something one can give or show
> "meie/woon teranga", or be a quality of a person, a country etc.
> ("Senegal reo teranga la" - according to Ismaila Lo, I believe that
> applies to the Gambia as well!) ???
>
> The third is "ruus". I have been taught that "Gumbe du ruus" because,
> as "Ruus" is in the eyes. What exactly does it mean?
> Is it shyness or shame? When people say that they avoid to see
> somebody because: "damma ko ruus" I have interpreted that as they
> are shy (because they respect or fear? somebody??). But I believe
> ruus in some contexs means shame "warr nga ruus!" (You should
> feel ashamed?)
>
> Respect seems to be a main topic, frequently related to all these
> other words. In Norway a person who "has respect" is a respected
> person, in Gambia a person who "has respect" is somebody who is
> respectful, gives respect. While "horomo" in Mandinka, as far as I
> have understood is respect, there is no single Wolof word which can
> be directly translated to respect (?). But so many words are translated
> to "respect" like "mingi mei ma teranga, woonul ma xammadi" was
> translated to me: "he gave me respect, never showed me disrespect".
> And somebody who "nyaka faida" or "nyaka joom" are respectless (??).
>
> I am wondering if "respect" in English or in Norwegian is used in a
> different way here than in the Gambia? At least it is probably less
> explicit in the upbringing/training of children. When I asked what
> was the most important thing newly circumcised children were taught, almost
> everybody said respect, to respect other people and oneself, and
> especially elders. Also when I asked somebody what they were taught
> at the daara, they said that apart from pray, read the Koran and
> make ablution, they learnt to respect other people.
>
> I hope some of you will have time to share your thoughts on the
> subject, in spite of the busy time schedules everybody seems to have.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Heidi Skramstad
>
>
>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:30:03 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: New address and members
Message-ID: <34CCC81B.644A@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Anthony Loum wrote:
>
> Hi Everybody,
>
> I will now be receiving Gambia-l postings in this new address. It is as
> follows: sambabalangarr@classic.msn.com
> I am still maintaining my regular UW address ( tloum@u.washington.edu ) just
> for list management functions. Private emails can now be directed to the new
> address.
> On another note, Dagma Christensen and Rolf Christensen have been added to
> the list. We welcome them and will be looking forward to their introductions
> and contributions.
>
> Thanks
> Tony Loum
Dagma
welcome to the Gambia-l . How was the anniversary of our late Aunty
Diana Christensen? I remember the last summer holidays we spent together
here in Maryland . Time really flies( Tempus fugit).
My regards to the rest of your family and Lamin.
Happy Eid.
Habib
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:30:15 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Re : Joke (again)
Message-ID: <9801261730.AA24482@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Heidi Skramstad, you wrote:

> Moe and others,
>
> > > personal opinion which may not even count. I wonder, though, how my
> > > son's God-mother (and many of the good white people on this list)
> > > would perceive
> > > this?
>
> As a "toubab" who have seen my self in the mirror under varying
> circumstances, I think the poem was just to the point. Very
> funny! I think nobody should take him/herself too seriously, then
> there would have been no fun left!
>
> Heidi Skramstad

Thank you Heidi. Like I said, since I didn't see any white people comment
as to the funniness of the poem, I was only wondering how funny they
(whites) might perceive it. Thanks for the input, and funny it really is.

You've been absolutely quiet, ain't you? welcome back!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:34:37 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Part 3 cont
Message-ID: <34CCC92D.3E85@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Bassirou Dodou Drammeh wrote:
>
> Mr.Jeng!
> We are thankful that your wife eventually allowed you to
> finish your run down of your visit to the Gambia.The report you have just
> given is both fair and broadminded;so, thank you so much for your time and
> Keep Up The Good Work Down There!
>
> Regards
> Bassss!
> -----Original Message-----
> From: JENGFANNEH@aol.com <JENGFANNEH@aol.com>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Date: Saturday, January 24, 1998 4:13 PM
> Subject: Part 3 cont
>
> >The system of governance needs to have these features:
> >
> > A. Create a justice system compleely independent and so powerful
> >that no individual or organization can control, influence or manipulate. By
> >virtue of its power and independence all rights of every citizen is
> protected,
> >especially minority opinions.
> > B. Revolutionized and developed a powerful media, completely
> >independent from government control. Media institution like TV stations,
> print
> >and radio should not in any way be another extended arm of the central
> >government.
> >
> > C. The system should allowed minority views, the Opposition should
> >not be viewed with resentment , social outcast or even becoming an
> impediment
> >to their career or survival.
> >

I agree and hope that the new leadership will take some of these views
constructively and try to impliment them through parliamentary
proceedures.
Good job Mr Jeng
Maybe you should moonlight for CNN if they do not have a local
correspondent
Habib Diab Ghanim
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:43:17 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: sutura and other wolof words
Message-ID: <199801261743.MAA15030@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

I forgot to include in the meaning of the mandingka word and phrase
I wrote in my response to Heidi."Buu-nyaa" may mean giving respect
through some physical act i.e. offer your service to someone
free because of their social standing, be it age or condition. Leaving your
bus seat for an adult, lady or handicap are all to my understanding some form
of Buu-nyaa. Also one may buu-nyaa someone verbally i.e calling older people
(similar age group with your parents Paa or Mba); or Koto to big brothers or
sisters. You buu-nyaa a bride or important guest by slautering an animal(from
chicken to a bull). in this case its very much like teranga.

malanding Jaiteh





------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:46:57 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: New members
Message-ID: <9801261746.AA25410@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

ELLA23K , you wrote:

>
> Moe I finished in 1978, and did all my high school years there. When did you
> attend? Where do you live now?
>

I hope you received my private response. If not, please send a private a
message with your correct address.

Thank you.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

=========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:53:21 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Is it a New Gambia
Message-ID: <34CCCD91.5031@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
>
> Father Mose,
>
> I want to commend you for your candid analysis of the situation in The Gambia
> as you see it. I am not surprised, however, for your honesty and the fair
> analysis of the current socio-economic and political situation in the country.
> Thank you, I think you have done a big service to the entire list and to all
> Gambians in general. Tell your wife not to worry about the computer as a
> 'wujjah', the computer can never replace the human touch.
>
> Anyway I agree with most of your analysis, and the present Government share
> most of your views too. And your comments will help in spurring more debates
> on good governance with the leadership. The Gambia, like most developing
> countries, is in the teething stage or the first evolutionary stage of
> democracy. So there will be some hitches are and there. Some of us have been
> privileged to live a countries where the tenets of democracy (such as freedom
> of speech, the press, human rights etc.) is a given and this helps our
> tolerance and analytical skills. The leadership is trying its best to
> cultivate that culture of genuine democracy.
>
> Democracy is more than just having a well-written constitution or having
> multi-party elections. Democracy is not acquired overnight. It is acquired
> over a period of time after some battle with previous political cultures,
> whatever they may be. Being in the Mids of things, I can honestly assure
> those who wish to listen that we have a bright future in The Gambia, and we
> are in the right path.
>
> With the positive contribution of all concerned, be they Gambians or not, we
> will reach that satisfactory level of democracy at a much shorter time than
> usual.
>
> Once again, thank you Mose, and this is a good beginning for 1998.
>
> PEACE
>
> Tombong Saidy

Tombong
It is nice to hear from you always and keeping in touch with the
community is what made the difference between you and the past and
present Embassy staff. Whatever the differences are or have been when
you always have a healthy dialogue which becomes contageous to a
friendlier atmosphere.
With that:
>From my family, Please wish the Gambian population and friends A Happy
Koriteh (Eid al Fitr) and as the saying goes "Yallah nan fekeh Dawen" (
may we meet next Ramadan year again) Inshallah. Ameen.
Plans for the Eid here is set for Thursday (29 th Jan 1998) in our local
community mosque-MCC Silver Spring.
And
Happy Independence Day in Advance
Kepp us updated on this year's events
Habib Diab Ghanim
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:56:27 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Re : Joke (again)
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988F1F@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

MAYBE IN THE NEXT LIFETIME BUT TIL THEN
MAY WE ALL LIVE LONG AND PROSPER!:)

> ----------
> From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Monday, January 26, 1998 11:21 AM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Re: Re : Joke (again)
>
> Keretha Cash, you wrote:
>
> > Maybe there is a little sarcasm involved; however, living tends to
> make
> > one a tad critical in perspective and if the shoe fits.....?
> >
> > Peace and keep the lines of communication flowing.
> >
> > Keretha
>
> I hear you and thank you very much. Now, how about
> some REAL Cash for me? :-)))))))))).
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:59:04 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: Email Update
Message-ID: <199801261759.MAA15040@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

>
> In all honesty, I graciously congratulate the Broncos for their win! I
> am happy for Elway! His team definitely stood up for him. However, if
> the Packer defense hadn't had almost 100 pounds on the Broncos in 67
> degree weather (they are from the "Frozen Tundra" you know), it probably
> would have been a different story. And I am very happy no one was
> injured this time.
>
> Oh well, I totally felt it was a good game, very emotional and that
> otherwise -- minus a couple of exceptions -- it boiled down to a battle
> of wits between the coaches.
>
> Congratulations Broncos and Bronco Fans!
> PANTHERS AND PACKERS, there's always next year!
>
> Now, on to basketball!!!
>
> PEACE! Keretha
Hold it Keratha!!
Are you saying that we am living at the North Pole? Well we live some 200 miles
north of Green Bay (a Packer Country). I must admit we are really speechless
over here. As you rightly said Packers could have performed better if the temp
were 30 degree F some 10 deg above our January highs.

Malanding

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 13:05:14 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri
Message-ID: <34CCD05A.3201@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

BAKSAWA wrote:
>
> Mr. Conateh:
>
> In a message dated 98-01-23 21:53:01 EST, you wrote:
>
> << Hi Members,
>
> <Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri ( A Happy Aidul Fitri ) to all of you in
> <advance. >>
>
> Happy Eid to you as well.
>
> It is my understanding that Laila Tul Hadr (Kitim) is on Tuesday, 1/27/98 in
> the Middle East. Does this mean it will be on Wednesday, 1/28/98, in the
> U.S.A? Input/information on this subect will be highly appreciated from
> anyone on the List.
>
> Wishing everyone a nice weekend.
>
> Awa Sey

Awa
Almost all of the USA observed the night of Qadr on the 25 Jan 1998,
which means we will also celebrate Eid on Thursday the 29 th 1998.
Inshallah
As you know lailatul Qadr falls on any of the odd numbered nights during
the last ten days of the holy month of Ramadan, so it depends on the
worshipers of the community involved to select one day -It is always
preferable to choose the 27 th night as depicted in the traditions of
the Sahabah.
Peace be unto you and may Allah accept our fasting and forgive us. Amin
Habib Diab Ghanim
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 13:02:55 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Remote sensing opportunity (fwd)
Message-ID: <199801261802.NAA15052@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Some might want to know about this.
Good luck

malanding

Forwarded message:
> From owner-forgrad-l-outgoing@mtu.edu Mon Jan 26 08:44:01 1998
> X-Received: MTU Resend v1.3 for forgrad-l
> X-Authentication-Warning: hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu: Host ffrpc110.ffr [141.219.149.110] claimed to be ffrpc110.ffr.mtu.edu
> Message-Id: <3.0.2.32.19980126084658.0077fe48@141.219.149.237>
> X-Sender: gdmroz@141.219.149.237
> X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Light Version 3.0.2 (32)
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 08:46:58 -0500
> To: forgrad-l@mtu.edu
> From: "Glenn D. Mroz" <gdmroz@mtu.edu>
> Subject: Remote sensing opportunity
> Mime-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> Precedence: list
>
>
> >>>Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 14:22:28 -0500
> >>>From: Georgia Flanagan <georgia@when.gsfc.nasa.gov>
> >>>To: amarchan@cs.gmu.edu
> >>>Subject: HPCP Announcement
> >>>
> >>>The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Earth and Space
> >>>Data Computing Division (ESDCD) and the Universities
> >>>Space Research Association are soliciting applications
> >>>from
> >>>qualified graduate students to participate in an
> >>>intensive lecture series in computational physics
> >>>during the three-week period July 13-31, 1998. The
> >>>ESDCD provides comprehensive research and development
> >>>support in data handling and computing for NASA Earth
> >>>and space science research programs. Resident
> >>>facilities include a 512-processor CRAY T3E, a CRAY J90
> >>>cluster composed of three 32-processor systems, and a
> >>>MasPar MP-2/MP-1 cluster. This program stems from
> >>>ongoing activities that reflect NASA's desire to help
> >>>train the next generation of physicists in the
> >>>development of computational techniques and algorithms
> >>>for scalable parallel computers in support of the
> >>>Federal High Performance Computing Communications
> >>>Program.
> >>>
> >>>Approximately 15 students will be selected to
> >>>participate in the three-week program. Students will be
> >>>given hands-on computer training and small group
> >>>interaction experience.
> >>>Experienced computational scientists will present a
> >>>series of lectures on advanced topics in computational
> >>>physics, with emphasis on computational fluid dynamics
> >>>and particle
> >>>methods. Cray Research will present lectures on
> >>>developing software for their massively parallel
> >>>architectures. Both the CRAY T3E and the MasPar
> >>>MP-2/MP-1 cluster will be
> >>>available for use by the students. At the end of the
> >>>program, students will be required to present a
> >>>15-minute summary of what they learned and how it
> >>>relates to their respective fields
> >>>of study.
> >>>
> >>>The program aims to attract Ph.D. students in the Earth
> >>>and space science disciplines whose present or future
> >>>research requires large-scale numerical modeling on
> >>>massively parallel architectures. Eligibility is
> >>>normally limited to those Earth and space science
> >>>students who are enrolled in U.S. universities and who
> >>>have passed their Ph.D. qualifying exams. Because of
> >>>NASA Goddard security regulations, citizens of certain
> >>>prescribed nations may be ineligible.
> >>>
> >>>Application materials should include: 1) a cover letter
> >>>explaining your interest in the program and how your
> >>>research will benefit from your participation; 2) your
> >>>area of research and thesis title; 3) a statement of
> >>>your career objectives and goals; 4) a description of
> >>>your relevant work experience; 5) your curriculum vitae
> >>>or resume with publication list; 6) your current
> >>>G.P.A.; 7) two letters of reference; 8) academic
> >>>transcripts showing two full years of work; and 9) a
> >>>statement of citizenship and visa status
> >>>
> >>>Students will receive a per diem and will be reimbursed
> >>>for domestic transportation to and from Greenbelt,
> >>>Maryland. Students will be housed near Goddard, and
> >>>transportation to and from Goddard will be provided
> >>>each day. Applications received before February 13,
> >>>1998 will receive full consideration. There are no
> >>>formal application materials. Selection announcements
> >>>are planned by March 6, 1998. All application
> >>>information should be directed to: Georgia L.
> >>>Flanagan, Program Coordinator, USRA/HPCP, Code 930.5,
> >>>NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771,
> >>>(301) 286-2080, georgia@cesdis.usra.edu.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>Sincerely,
> >>>
> >>>Georgia Flanagan
> >>>Program Coordinator
> >>>georgia@cesdis.usra.edu
> >>>
> >>>USRA/GVSP
> >>>7501 Forbes Blvd., Suite 206
> >>>Seabrook, Maryland 20706-2253
> >>>301-805-8396 - voice
> >>>301-805-8466 - fax
> >>>
> >>>USRA/CESDIS
> >>>Code 930.5
> >>>NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr.
> >>>Greenbelt, Maryland 20771
> >>>301-286-2080 - voice
> >>>301-286-1777 - fax
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>--
> >>
> >> **** WSGC **** WSGC **** WSGC ****
> >>
> >>To join or leave the WSGC listserver, please send a message to:
> >> Listserv@csd.uwm.edu
> >>To subscribe, leave the subject line blank. In the body of the message,
> type:
> >> Subscribe WSGC-L yourfirstname yourlastname
> >>To unsubscribe, leave the subject line blank, and in the body of the
> >>message type:
> >> Signoff WSGC-L
> >>If you experience difficulties, please write to:
> >> WSGC-L-request@csd.uwm.edu
> >>For more information on the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium, please see
> >>our Web Site at:
> >> http://www.uwm.edu/dept/WSGC
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> Glenn D. Mroz
> Program Coordinator, Forest Ecology and Management
> School of Forestry and Wood Products
> Michigan Tech University
> Houghton Michigan 49931
> (906) 487 2496 Phone
> (906) 487 2915
> http://forestry.mtu.edu
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 13:09:47 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Joke
Message-ID: <34CCD16B.B9@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

BAKSAWA wrote:
>
> Sillah:
>
> In a message dated 98-01-23 23:32:39 EST, you wrote:
>
> << One day he lost a dear relative. As usual, a delegation of of the House
> >of Parliament was at his house to attend the burial and to extend their
> >condolences. When any of those members told him, " Accept my sympathy "
> >he in reply told them " I wish you the same" unknowingly. Quite
> >interesting but these were old time politicians. What should he have
> >said in reply? >>
>
> I think it was quite logical for him to respond "thanks for your support" or
> just a simple "thanks" (especially if he was not confident with his command of
> the English language!).
>
> That was a very funny joke. It is nice to have something to laugh about once
> in a while!!
>
> Awa Sey

Another Parlimentarian replied to a question brought up to him during
one of his British tours
Q- Do you have any minerals in the Gambia?
His reply
Yes we Santa yallah, Farage mineral factory and Vimto.


--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 13:14:07 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: conference
Message-ID: <34CCD26F.997@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

TSaidy1050 wrote:
>
> Gambia-l,
>
> It is a good idea to have a leadership conference and I will encourage all who
> could go to attend. The maxim 'United we stand and divided we fall' almost
> manifested it self during the last ALD (African Liberation Day) in Washington
> DC. If I remember correctly, this is first of such conference and I think it
> is a good sign and should be well attended..
>
> The unfortunate thing, I hate to predict this, the turnout for the conference
> would be very low and the Cultural Gala Night will be jam-packed. This used to
> be the case during the ALD symposia organised over the years. The ALD is fast
> approaching and if all Gambian organisations in the Greater DC area could
> unite, a lot of funds would be raised.
>
> Latjor and the others keep up the good work and continue your endless efforts
> for the success of this conference. We would like to read the report of the
> out come.
>
> PEACE
>
> Tombong Saidy
Tombong
Maybe the solution is to make both of them on the same day and in the
same location.
Habib
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 12:18:03 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Email Update
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988F20@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

you know how big Gilbert Brown is? I was concerned when I saw him on
the sidelines after his first play. He was so out of breath. Moving
all that bulk in warmer weather (67 deg.) as opposed to 28 deg or even
30 degrees will make a big difference in performance.

However, I am glad Elway got his superbowl ring before he retired. But
now what's this i hear? He's thinking about changing his mind?:)

By the way, it's 30+ deg. here in Milwaukee. And we have lots of snow
cover. So Malanding, where are you located?

All about the game.:)

Keretha

> ----------
> From: Malanding S. Jaiteh[SMTP:msjaiteh@mtu.edu]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Monday, January 26, 1998 11:59 AM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: Re: Email Update
>
> >
> > In all honesty, I graciously congratulate the Broncos for their
> win! I
> > am happy for Elway! His team definitely stood up for him. However,
> if
> > the Packer defense hadn't had almost 100 pounds on the Broncos in 67
> > degree weather (they are from the "Frozen Tundra" you know), it
> probably
> > would have been a different story. And I am very happy no one was
> > injured this time.
> >
> > Oh well, I totally felt it was a good game, very emotional and that
> > otherwise -- minus a couple of exceptions -- it boiled down to a
> battle
> > of wits between the coaches.
> >
> > Congratulations Broncos and Bronco Fans!
> > PANTHERS AND PACKERS, there's always next year!
> >
> > Now, on to basketball!!!
> >
> > PEACE! Keretha
> Hold it Keratha!!
> Are you saying that we am living at the North Pole? Well we live some
> 200 miles north of Green Bay (a Packer Country). I must admit we are
> really speechless over here. As you rightly said Packers could have
> performed better if the temp were 30 degree F some 10 deg above our
> January highs.
>
> Malanding
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 14:04:40 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Dumping on the developing world (fwd)
Message-ID: <34CCDE48.63EC@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> Habib Ghanim, you wrote:
>
> > Moe
> > Dumping harzardous waste almost happened in the Gambia in 1983 near
> > Gungur. The same group that wanted to have our coins minted were
> > involved. I knew of it ( through a close friend of mine here in
> > Washington DC) and when the group visited Banjul to finalize the three
> > million dollar deal, I interviened by writing an letter to the
> > authorities in both local government and external affairs expressing my
> > concerns. The plan was to bury the liqiud waste (suspected to be
> > potentially dangerous if exposed in the atmosphere) in the ground at
> > least three hundred feet deep near kartong or Gungur and the Gambia
> > would be paid a hefty amount of money each year.
> > Fortunately it did not happen (as far as I know ) and they moved to
> > Guinea Bissau who were negotiating and needed the money badly. Only
> > Allah knows what happened afterwards.
> > These kinds of hazardous wastes do not surface until the drums start
> > leaking from rusting several years later.
> > I am glad some is looking out for our interest
> > Happy Eid (Koriteh) in advance
> > Habib Diab Ghanim
>
> Brother habib,
>
> It's indeed a pleasure to hear from you again, and thank you for the
> information above. Now that we are closer to the end of Ramadhan, I hope
> that you will be active on the list again.
>
> Happy Eid to you and the family.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> ========================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
>
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Moe
Thanks and Happy Eid to you too
Habib
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 17:35:46 -0000
From: "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: "Gambia-L" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: New Edition of FRESH
Message-ID: <B0000043192@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Torstein Grotnes" <tgr@commit.gm>
via Commit


Hello Gambia-L.

Message from IMG Company Ltd.
----------------------
A new FREE online edition of FRESH is now available at address:
http://w1.2220.telia.com/~u222000299

The IMG Company is interested in any feedback from
the readers on improvments and critics about the FRESH paper.

International advertisers are welcome to submit ads to FRESH
for the Gambian market and for the online edition.

Please send any inquieries or correspondence to the IMG e-mail address:
FRESH@commit.gm
---------------------

============================================
FRESH - The Bi-weekly Sports and Entertainment Chronicle
Published by the Informer Media Group Company Ltd.
YMCA MDI Road Kanifing
PO.Box: 2735, Serrekunda, The Gambia
Fax: 225833 E-mail: FRESH@commit.gm
============================================





------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 14:20:53 -0800
From: "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Is it a new Gambia?
Message-ID: <199801262022.OAA23175@mailhost.cyberramp.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Janko
Much Thanks to you for your input of Monday, Jan.1998
If I may indulge, I would like to resonate a major point in your mail.
SUSTAINABILITY.
It cannot be gainsaid that central to all the development projects, that
are currently under way, and that may follow, is the issue of
sustainability.
The initiatives taken to venture into projects for improvement of the
infrastructure, are indeed commendable. The present administration in the
Gambia is duly credit for the efforts they continue to make to bring the
proposed dormant projects into action.
they have inexhaustively made insurmountable strides to bring forth many
projects and accomplished a great deal.
But again, I think inextricably tied into all projects is the provisions
made to sustain.
The inability to put forth the necessary provisions for purposes of
obtaining long life span out of the completed structures, still remains the
challenge faced by my developing nations.
The idea of building school houses in nearly every single village in the
nation was indeed good. This is not to diminish the point you made about
obtaining quality education. You made a valid point about staffing or lack
thereof.
I can't help but to think that not only did the authorities want to add to
their success of providing educational possibilities to all children in the
Gambia, but that these school houses can be further used for adult
education as well.
I think adult education; the ability to read and write is more accessible
now with school houses in every village.
Do you know if there are any community development projects addressing the
issue of adult education?
Again I thank you for your insightful mail.
Morro Krubally
----------
> From: janko.fofana@commit.gm <gambia-l@commit.gm>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Is it a new Gambia?
> Date: Monday, January 26, 1998 3:33 AM
>
> Sent by "Janko Fofana" <janko.fofana@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
>
> I would like to thank all those who contribute to this forum and would
like
> to encourage everybody to share ideas on topics that are of national
> interest. It is important for us in the Gambia or outside to be kept
> informed of issues affecting our nation. It is always nice to hear
> something about your country especially if you live outside of it. I
> remember my student days in the US when I was on the List and always
eager
> to browse through to see anything new about the Gambia. I am sure some of
> you are now like me eager all the time to get information about politics,
> economics or social development in the country.
>
> Since I am now back, I want to put in a small contribution to the topic
"Is
> it a new Gambia? Sincerely speaking there is a lot of development going
on
> in the country since the military take over but does that warrant it to
be
> called a "New Gambia"? In my view certainly not. Development is an
ongoing
> process and some of what are being implemented today were plans already
> underway during the past regime. Don't get me wrong. I give the credit to
> the present government for implementing long overdue projects like the
TV,
> The North Bank Road (Barra - Kerewan with a bridge at Kerewan under
> construction) etc but evidently much was also done after independence in
> 1965. It will be unfair to completely ignore what has been accomplished,
> small as it look to some people. We just need to push things at a quicker
> pace as is being done at the moment. Again I want to say that the present
> government is doing a lot of good work but I strongly believe we need to
> revisit some of the priority areas (if they are priorities for the
> government). Think of all the schools built since the 1994 take over -
> primary, junior and secondary schools in amost every corner in the
country.
> Do we have furniture and teachers for these schools? It might not be a
bad
> idea to improve some of the schools - better teachers, furniture and much
> needed text books - and have few additional high schools rather than
giving
> every village a primary school. Of course education is important but what
> is more important is what you get from your investment in education. Are
we
> getting our children better educated or just providing schools for them
> where the quality of their education can be compromised? What are we
doing
> to help our school dropouts and those who graduate without any job
> opportunity? More skills centers and needed, though it can be argued
> government is thinking along those lines but it is my opinion more needs
to
> be done. I am happy about the idea of the members to contribute through
> the educational assistance to needy students as being discussed.
>
> Finally, I believe the General Hospital in Farafenni, the new Airport
> Terminal, improvement in road network in the rural areas are but few of
the
> achievement of the present regime that they should be given some credit
> for. However, we need to think of making good use of these facilities and
> make them sustainable. A lot of money was invested in these projects and
> government should ensure that they don't lie idle. More development
> projects are being discussed as revealed during the President's meet the
> people's tour last November and it appears the government has already
> secured funding for most of the projects. I will keep you posted on some
> developments as they unfold.
>
> Also remember that our financial year is now from January to December and
a
> lot of things are being adjusted to match the calendar year. So I believe
> we have to continue with our efforts and don't think that it is a new
> Gambia. The key here is sustainability! Development is an ongoing
process
> and we still have a long way to go. It is a collective responsibilty and
we
> all have a role to play whether at home or abroad but better to be here
to
> paddle the canoe with us. Your role there is also important as most if
not
> all of you are on a mission there. Good luck to all of you and welcome
> onboard when the mission is accomplished.
>
> So much for now. Sorry for giving you so much to read but I hope it is a
> small contribution.
>
> Janko Fofana
>
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 15:35:55 -0500
From: AYONELSONHOMIAH@compuserve.com
To: "INTERNET:gambia-l@u.washington.edu" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Email Update
Message-ID: <199801261536_MC2-30B4-66BB@compuserve.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Disposition: inline

hello to all the senegambia posse !!!

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 21:47:05 +0000
From: "Ousman Sawaneh" <osawaneh@post9.tele.dk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: introduction
Message-ID: <19980126204728.AAA21986@default>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Hello gambia-lers,
Thanks very much for letting me join your bantaba and
share these grate opportunity with you. Originally i am from
baddibu gunjur village north bank division, I have been
living in denmark for many years with my wife Haddy
fanneh sawaneh, And i have been the Chairman for the gambian
socio- cultural association in denmark.



Regards,
Ousman Sawaneh












------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 23:49:46 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
Message-ID: <01bd2a9b$efda4ac0$LocalHost@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

HALIFA wrote:-

Hence, the issue is not whether one is committed to a private sector led
>growth or public sector led growth. The issue is the question of finding an
>alternative policy that could provide appropriate solutions to our deficits
>and indebtedness.

****************************************************************************

Gambia-L,

I cannot of course agree with everything Mr.Sallah had to say on this
very,very important National topic,The Economy;but I must congratulate him
nonetheless for raising a number of very crucial issues that must be looked
at very,very seriously and with a lot of flexibility if we as a nation are
to really transform ourselves from a beggar nation to at least a
"*****-Cat" economy.

If Mr.Sallah's numbers are correct,then the health of our nation,s Economy
is
in a very serious jeopardy,a fact that makes it absolutely necessary for the
government to listen and be opened to all suggestions,regardless of their
origins,that could help to atleast prevent this mountain of debts from
piling on our heads and those of our children like its nobody's
business.So,PDOIS' call upon the other parties to forget their political
loyalities and discuss this national agenda impartially is both positive and
necessary.It must be heeded,though,not only by the professional politicians,
but also by any well informed Gambians who know a thing or two about how
governments and economies are run.And because we, the Gambian diaspora,
constitute a very significant portion of that category,we cannot allow this
debate to abate without contributing our couple of pennies to it.Because
this debate is afterall about the "National Osusu",and of course we also
should be part of that!

Having said that,I must add that even though PDOIS has made some very
important suggestions( eg.the reduction of foreign travels and cutting of
entourage on the part of the government and the need to invest in some of
the neglected sectors of our economy like fishing,carpentry,masonry and arts
and the crafts) that need looking at in our struggle to turn things around
for our economy,some of its arguments are fuzzy at best.

First of all,it dismisses as non issue whether its party is in favour of
private sector led growth or a public sector one, but I would have thought
that that is exactly the issue here.All of us know that PDOIS is either a
Socialist or Semi-Socialist political party and, as a result, the economic
strategy it is now putting forward and confidently portraying as the only
cure of the economic ailments of our nation are a direct product of Marxian
Economic analysis which is by default hostile to market forces.

So,even though we have not heard the government's version,we can safely
deduct from what PDOIS itself is saying here that the government believes
that its workforce is still too large and inorder to achieve efficiency and
higher productivity many civil servants will have to be retrenched; that, in
addition to the need to cut expenditure on services and to increase
taxes.And, clearly,these are the very strategies that PDOIS is idelogically
opposed to.So,we now know,whether Pdois wants to admit it or not,that it is
the Party which favours Big Government,whereas the Government is now tired
of playing big daddy and wants to wean the people and encourage them to
develop the private sector.

The problem now is how can we reconcile between PDOIS' call on the
Government to become much more efficient with its ideological hostility to
reducing the size of Government and expanding the private sector,and turning
over some of the states functions to the market.Nobody is doubting here the
nobility of PDOIS intentions for the Nation, but compassion is one thing and
the economic strategy that would work and could enable us turn things around
is something else altogether.We have experimented with huge public
corporations (PWD,GUC,GPTC ,PORTS etc) throughout the past three decades
since our independence,but, as all of us know too well,they have contributed
nothing to our economy but indebtednes,corruption, nepotism and
mediocrity.And PDOIS's suggestion to set up new public corporation,never
mind how neat the name looks on paper or how complicated the explanation of
how it should work sounds ,is nothing but a repeat of our past economic
mistakes.The way forward for our nation,just as it is now the practice in
most countries of the world,is not to build anymore cumbersome and money
losing public corporations,but rather to dismantle existing ones and turn
their resources over to competent private individuals as loans, so they
would provide those services to the public.PDOIS is absolutely right in
saying that the present private sector in the Gambia is incapable of
generating enough revenues in the form of taxes to make any significant
impact on our Nation's KingSize deficit and indebtedness.But that
incapacity,contrary to what PDOIS would like us to believe,has nothing to do
with the inherent nature of the Private Sector in general,but everything to
do with the tiny size of our Nations private sector and the lack of
sufficient incentives and facilities that would make it work to full
capacity.And if our government wants to realize its dream of transforming
our now almost primitive economy to one of Tigers or "*****-Cats" or
whatever wild animal,it must channel much of its energy towards recruiting
the young and educated Gambians(the ones inside and outside) and provide
them with the resources and create for them the kind of atmosphere that is
conducive to free and fair competition for the Dalasis of the consumers in
exchange for the services these new entrepreneurs would provide.

And when that happens in earnest in at least most of the various sectors of
our economic life,there would be enough money to go around that would make
it totally unnecessary for members of our National Assembly to send some of
their already meagre salaries to their respective constituencies to be set
up there as funds for their electorates.


Regards Bassss!









------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 15:54:33 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: introduction
Message-ID: <9801262054.AA45192@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit


Welcome to the list.

Is your wife by any chance related to Mariama Fanneh? She (Mariama) was a
former classmate and I would love to get in touch with her. Perhaps, you
wife might have a contact address. Please, help!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow


>
> Hello gambia-lers,
> Thanks very much for letting me join your bantaba and
> share these grate opportunity with you. Originally i am from
> baddibu gunjur village north bank division, I have been
> living in denmark for many years with my wife Haddy
> fanneh sawaneh, And i have been the Chairman for the gambian
> socio- cultural association in denmark.
>
>
>
> Regards,
> Ousman Sawaneh
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 21:16:33 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9801262121.A3309-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I thought this was very interesting and wanted to know what everyone had
to say about it!! I personally found it amusing and afterwards, my
room-mates and I started calling each other male names!! You'll
understand why after you've read the article.
Happy Eid in advance to everyone and I hope everyone is doing great!!!
Ancha.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 15:49:55 -0500 (EST)
From: Marsha Wynter <mwynter@golden.net>
To: wynt3940@mach1.wlu.ca
Subject: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!]


>>Good Morning All,
>>
>>Below is an article written by a misguided Caucasian student at Cornell.
>>Though I find the overtone of the letter to be extremely superficial
>>(especially when he eludes to the fact that he is trying to assist in
>>educating us, imagine that?) it is always interesting to read expressions
>>like the one below. Respond in kind if the spirit hits you. I know I
>will. >Thanks for passing the info on Kim, and sorry for any duplications!
>>
>>Have a pleasant day!!
>
>
>>>>>> "black/white, asian/white dating disparities"
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Let me clear the issue up -- bear with me, this will be lengthy.
>>>>>> First of all, there is a HUGE disparity in Asian/white dating. MANY
>>>>>> MORE white male/asian female couples exist, relative to asian
>>>>>> male/white female couples. The same dispairty exists, even in greater
>>>>>> numbers, with black men and white women. 94% of black/white couples
>>>>>> involve a black man and white woman. Some facts that will come into
>>>>>> play -- about 3.5% of the U.S. population is Asian. About 12.7% of
>the >>>>> population is African. I'm not opposed to interracial dating,
>however, >>>>> there are some issues. Black women and Asian men (and to a
>lesser >>>>> extent,whitemen) are definitely getting the "short end of the
>stick",
>>>>>> from a dating perspective. Why?.....
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Trust me, (tell it like it is), the problem lies within black women.
>>>>>> This is not a racist comment. Black women, on the whole, are not
>>>>>> preceived as being "feminine" and "attractive" (by the Western
>World's
>>>>>> standards) by a majority of males. Many perceive them as being
>>>>>> "manly", with characteristics such as a deeper voice, shorter hair,
>>>>>> more bodily hair, baggy clothes, and a lack of sexiness and
>>>>>> flirtaciousness. It's the nature of a man to consider overall
>>>>>> attractiveness when chossing a date, and looks is a great part of
>>>>>> this.This has compelled may black men to look for a white woman to
>>>>>> date. Consequently, many black males, which compromise a significant
>>>>>> segment of the population, date white women. This leaves white males
>>>>>> with no choice. Many, in an effort to releive their lonlieness, date
>>>>>> Asian females. This leaves Asian males with the short end of the
>stick >>>>> along with black females. Due to the fact the African
>population is >>>>> much greater than the Asian population, white males
>are also left out
>>>>>> to a lesser extent. Black females have the highest rate of
>>>>>> singularity of any ethnic/gender group in our country, and it's
>>>>>> precisely due to their lack of softness and feminity both in
>>>>>> personality and appearance. This isn't a racist, mean comment -- it's
>>>>>> one meant to educate and help lonely people. If you really want to
>>>>>> read more into this, look at the "general forum" -- I have many
>>>>>> postings in there. The solution? Many would fret at that word --
>>>>>> "solution", claiming I think interracial dating is a "problem"
>needing >>>>> to be "solved". Well, I feel that there are too many lonely
>people
>>>>>> out there who need a partner -- and should have one --
>>>>>> and yes, I perceive these disparities as a problem. Black women have
>>>>>> to shed their "macho" "masculine" and unattractive character and
>>>>>> appearance. This will compel black men to actually ENJOY dating black
>>>>>> women, which will mean more white women for whit emen, which will
>mean >>>>> more asian women for asian men. There will be many less lonely
>people >>>>> in the world -- and it all stems from the masculinity of the
>black >>>>> female. Sorry, I know I'll offend some, but in my heart I know
>I'm not >>>>> a racist, and it's for the better -- and I'm not afraid to
>take any >>>>> irrational heat. Many will agree with me, however. Anyone
>willing to >>>>> discuss this with me can email me at jw43@cornell.edu,
>and I'll >>>>> gladly reply.
>>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>>> Jason
>>>>>> (p.s., I'm a white male, with a white girlfriend!)
>>>>>> by J
>
>Now for the response........
>
>>The response from a woman named
>>"Tonia" tells it like it is, was and forever will be
>>
>>
>>> ---------------------------------------------
>>>Jason,
>>>I appreciate your honesty and your opinion. I am a black woman and I'm
>>>not the
>>>least bit offended. I attribute your perspective to a lack of exposure.
>>>I
>>>realize that only age, maturity and an introduction to what YOU'VE been
>>>missing
>>>out on will change that. I will only entertain your ignorance for a
>>>moment,
>>>but feel free to reply and we'll keep the dialogue going!
>>>I live in Washington, DC and I have never had a problem finding a man!
>>>What
>>>'short stick' are you talking about! Don't fool yourself into thinking
>>>that
>>>white men aren't attracted to us just because you aren't. Black men
>>>love
>>>us;
>>>Asian men are fascinated by our mystery; African men admire our
>>>strength,
>>>intellect, and confidence; Latin men adore our curves, sensuality, and
>>>rhythm;
>>>Italian men savor our style and the variety in our shades; Brits enjoy
>>>our
>>>quick
>>>wit and zest for life; Australians love our good conversation and love
>>>for
>>>good
>>>beer (okay my love for good beer); and I could go on and on! It's only
>>>white
>>>'American' men that admire us secretly. You watch us at work, at
>>>school,
>>>in the
>>>street and you want to get to know us, but your shame won't allow it.
>>>You
>>>too
>>>are fascinated by the mystic. You like the way our brown skin glistens
>>>on
>>>your
>>>pale white... when we shake your hand, that is! Short hair is sexy and
>>>deep
>>>voices are sensual... ask your grand-dad!
>>>Black women, my dear, are known nurturers. While your mothers,
>>>grandmothers and
>>>great-grands sat and drank tea... we were feeding you, teaching you...
>>>we
>>>raised
>>>you! But there's no need to get philosophical on ya... let's keep it to
>>>the here and now!
>>> HardCopy Listing of 'ALL NOTEBOOK' for MITCHELC
>>>Page 4
>>>My advice to you dear is to stop watching Jenny Jones, Cops, and Ricky
>>>Lake...
>>>the sistahs that you see on TV, are not representative of the masses.
>>>The
>>>sistahs in my circle wouldn't know a pair of baggy jeans if they slapped
>>>them in the face. Charm and flirt are our middle names.
>>>Validate your research with some exposure. Take your blinders off and
>>>feed
>>>your igonorance. There's an entire world that YOU are missing out on!
>>>Peace and Blessings,
>>>Tonia
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 22:16:30 EST
From: BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Joke
Message-ID: <6f1414b4.34cd5190@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit



Morro:

It's nice catching up with you as well. Please say hello to our wife for
me!!!

******************************************************************************
******************

In a message dated 98-01-25 Morro krubally wrote:

<Awa:
What a pleasure indeed to catch you on the line.
Wasn't that joke about the politician hilarious?
You know in those days the English language was still in it's rugged form.
Not quite as evolved as it is today.
So, arguably, in the contex of the times, he might have been right by
responding " The same to you."
David letterman or Jay leno should get a hold of this one.
Only I wouldn't tell them the politician was a African.
>>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 22:44:41 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: "Gambia-l" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Fw: Music and Dance Ensemble
Message-ID: <199801270455.WAA04096@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



----------
> From: Frank D Gunderson <fgunders@INDIANA.EDU>
> To: AFRIMUSE@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU
> Subject: Music and Dance Ensemble
> Date: Monday, January 26, 1998 3:23 PM
>
> I have been informed that the University of Oklahoma is looking for an
> African music and dance ensemble to perform as a part of it's "Summer
> Wind," Series. Date is scheduled for July third. As I understand it,
> they have a budget of 2000$ plus, with all travel expenses paid, within
> the continental United States. So, if you are a member of an ensemble in
> the states, or know of one that might be touring at that time, and are
> interested, please contact Lance Dreg: ldrege@ou.edu for more details.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 09:05:25 +0100
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Email Update
Message-ID: <9B236DF9AF96CF11A5C94044F32190311DB3B7@DKDIFS02>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Moe, sport is like that - never predict who will win. I saw the match
and it was so fantastic, and who won - the Denver-boys !!! Asbj=F8rn

> ----------
> Fra: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sendt: 23. januar 1998 16:36
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: Email Update
>=20
> For those football fanatics (american football, that is) this will be
> a=20
> good weekend to see some "butt kicking". I can't wait for superbowl
> sunday when Brett Favre and the GB Packers trample on John Elway and
> the
> Denver Broncos. The Broncos will require more than a miracle to
> dethrone
> the "world" (as in america) champions. For those sorry Broncos fans,
> well
> what can I say except....down you will go :-))).
>=20
> Have a wonderful weekend!
>=20
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>=20
> =
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
> =3D=3D=3D
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> =
----------------------------------------------------------------------
> ---
>=20

------------------------------

Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

Posted - 10 Sep 2021 :  16:46:41  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 15:44:32 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
Message-ID: <01bd2b21$50e2d500$0c2385c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Ancha!
Thanks for the forward ! I will try to comment on it if my time
permits,but in the meantime,Keep Up The Good Work Down There!


Regards Bass!

****************************************************************************
***************************************

>I thought this was very interesting and wanted to know what everyone had
>to say about it!! I personally found it amusing and afterwards, my
>room-mates and I started calling each other male names!! You'll
>understand why after you've read the article.
>Happy Eid in advance to everyone and I hope everyone is doing great!!!
> Ancha.



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 13:15:07 +0000
From: "Papa N'Jie" <papa1@mdx.ac.uk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk
Subject: unsubscribe
Message-ID: <34CDDDDB.5EB8@mdx.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

hi list managers, could u please unsubscribe me until further notice.
thanks and keep up the good work...

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 09:06:05 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988F2E@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Thank you -- it is always enjoyable to share knowledge with those in
need. Tonia really said it all very eloquently. All you can really do
is plant the seed -- hopefully this ground is not too thorny.

Peace and Understanding!
Keretha

> ----------
> From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u[SMTP:bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Monday, January 26, 1998 8:16 PM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
>=20
> I thought this was very interesting and wanted to know what everyone
> had=20
> to say about it!! I personally found it amusing and afterwards, my=20
> room-mates and I started calling each other male names!! You'll=20
> understand why after you've read the article.=20
> Happy Eid in advance to everyone and I hope everyone is doing =
great!!!
> Ancha.
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 15:49:55 -0500 (EST)
> From: Marsha Wynter <mwynter@golden.net>
> To: wynt3940@mach1.wlu.ca
> Subject: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!]
>=20
>=20
> >>Good Morning All,
> >>
> >>Below is an article written by a misguided Caucasian student at
> Cornell.=20
> >>Though I find the overtone of the letter to be extremely =
superficial
>=20
> >>(especially when he eludes to the fact that he is trying to assist
> in=20
> >>educating us, imagine that?) it is always interesting to read
> expressions=20
> >>like the one below. Respond in kind if the spirit hits you. I know
> I=20
> >will. >Thanks for passing the info on Kim, and sorry for any
> duplications!=20
> >>
> >>Have a pleasant day!!
> >
> > =20
> >>>>>> "black/white, asian/white dating disparities"=20
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Let me clear the issue up -- bear with me, this will be
> lengthy.=20
> >>>>>> First of all, there is a HUGE disparity in Asian/white dating.
> MANY=20
> >>>>>> MORE white male/asian female couples exist, relative to asian
> >>>>>> male/white female couples. The same dispairty exists, even in
> greater=20
> >>>>>> numbers, with black men and white women. 94% of black/white
> couples=20
> >>>>>> involve a black man and white woman. Some facts that will come
> into=20
> >>>>>> play -- about 3.5% of the U.S. population is Asian. About =
12.7%
> of=20
> >the >>>>> population is African. I'm not opposed to interracial
> dating,=20
> >however, >>>>> there are some issues. Black women and Asian men
> (and to a=20
> >lesser >>>>> extent,whitemen) are definitely getting the "short end
> of the=20
> >stick",
> >>>>>> from a dating perspective. Why?.....=20
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Trust me, (tell it like it is), the problem lies within black
> women.=20
> >>>>>> This is not a racist comment. Black women, on the whole, are
> not=20
> >>>>>> preceived as being "feminine" and "attractive" (by the Western =

> >World's
> >>>>>> standards) by a majority of males. Many perceive them as being
> >>>>>> "manly", with characteristics such as a deeper voice, shorter
> hair,=20
> >>>>>> more bodily hair, baggy clothes, and a lack of sexiness and
> >>>>>> flirtaciousness. It's the nature of a man to consider overall=20
> >>>>>> attractiveness when chossing a date, and looks is a great =
part
> of=20
> >>>>>> this.This has compelled may black men to look for a white =
woman
> to
> >>>>>> date. Consequently, many black males, which compromise a
> significant=20
> >>>>>> segment of the population, date white women. This leaves white
> males=20
> >>>>>> with no choice. Many, in an effort to releive their =
lonlieness,
> date=20
> >>>>>> Asian females. This leaves Asian males with the short end of
> the=20
> >stick >>>>> along with black females. Due to the fact the African=20
> >population is >>>>> much greater than the Asian population, white
> males=20
> >are also left out
> >>>>>> to a lesser extent. Black females have the highest rate of=20
> >>>>>> singularity of any ethnic/gender group in our country, and =
it's
>=20
> >>>>>> precisely due to their lack of softness and feminity both in
> >>>>>> personality and appearance. This isn't a racist, mean comment
> -- it's=20
> >>>>>> one meant to educate and help lonely people. If you really =
want
> to=20
> >>>>>> read more into this, look at the "general forum" -- I have
> many=20
> >>>>>> postings in there. The solution? Many would fret at that
> word --=20
> >>>>>> "solution", claiming I think interracial dating is a "problem" =

> >needing >>>>> to be "solved". Well, I feel that there are too many
> lonely=20
> >people
> >>>>>> out there who need a partner -- and should have one --
> >>>>>> and yes, I perceive these disparities as a problem. Black =
women
> have=20
> >>>>>> to shed their "macho" "masculine" and unattractive character
> and=20
> >>>>>> appearance. This will compel black men to actually ENJOY =
dating
> black=20
> >>>>>> women, which will mean more white women for whit emen, which
> will=20
> >mean >>>>> more asian women for asian men. There will be many less
> lonely=20
> >people >>>>> in the world -- and it all stems from the masculinity =
of
> the=20
> >black >>>>> female. Sorry, I know I'll offend some, but in my heart =
I
> know=20
> >I'm not >>>>> a racist, and it's for the better -- and I'm not
> afraid to=20
> >take any >>>>> irrational heat. Many will agree with me, however.
> Anyone=20
> >willing to >>>>> discuss this with me can email me at
> jw43@cornell.edu,=20
> >and I'll >>>>> gladly reply.
> >>>>>> Thanks,
> >>>>>> Jason
> >>>>>> (p.s., I'm a white male, with a white girlfriend!)=20
> >>>>>> by J
> >
> >Now for the response........
> >
> >>The response from a woman named
> >>"Tonia" tells it like it is, was and forever will be=20
> >>
> >>
> >>> ---------------------------------------------=20
> >>>Jason,
> >>>I appreciate your honesty and your opinion. I am a black woman =
and
> I'm=20
> >>>not the
> >>>least bit offended. I attribute your perspective to a lack of
> exposure.=20
> >>>I
> >>>realize that only age, maturity and an introduction to what YOU'VE
> been=20
> >>>missing
> >>>out on will change that. I will only entertain your ignorance =
for
> a=20
> >>>moment,
> >>>but feel free to reply and we'll keep the dialogue going!
> >>>I live in Washington, DC and I have never had a problem finding a
> man!=20
> >>>What
> >>>'short stick' are you talking about! Don't fool yourself into
> thinking=20
> >>>that
> >>>white men aren't attracted to us just because you aren't. Black
> men=20
> >>>love
> >>>us;
> >>>Asian men are fascinated by our mystery; African men admire our=20
> >>>strength,
> >>>intellect, and confidence; Latin men adore our curves, sensuality,
> and=20
> >>>rhythm;
> >>>Italian men savor our style and the variety in our shades; Brits
> enjoy=20
> >>>our
> >>>quick
> >>>wit and zest for life; Australians love our good conversation and
> love=20
> >>>for
> >>>good
> >>>beer (okay my love for good beer); and I could go on and on! It's
> only=20
> >>>white
> >>>'American' men that admire us secretly. You watch us at work, at=20
> >>>school,
> >>>in the
> >>>street and you want to get to know us, but your shame won't allow
> it.=20
> >>>You
> >>>too
> >>>are fascinated by the mystic. You like the way our brown skin
> glistens=20
> >>>on
> >>>your
> >>>pale white... when we shake your hand, that is! Short hair is =
sexy
> and=20
> >>>deep
> >>>voices are sensual... ask your grand-dad!
> >>>Black women, my dear, are known nurturers. While your mothers,=20
> >>>grandmothers and
> >>>great-grands sat and drank tea... we were feeding you, teaching
> you...=20
> >>>we
> >>>raised
> >>>you! But there's no need to get philosophical on ya... let's keep
> it to=20
> >>>the here and now!
> >>> HardCopy Listing of 'ALL NOTEBOOK' for MITCHELC=20
> >>>Page 4
> >>>My advice to you dear is to stop watching Jenny Jones, Cops, and
> Ricky=20
> >>>Lake...
> >>>the sistahs that you see on TV, are not representative of the
> masses.=20
> >>>The
> >>>sistahs in my circle wouldn't know a pair of baggy jeans if they
> slapped=20
> >>>them in the face. Charm and flirt are our middle names.
> >>>Validate your research with some exposure. Take your blinders off
> and=20
> >>>feed
> >>>your igonorance. There's an entire world that YOU are missing =
out
> on!=20
> >>>Peace and Blessings,
> >>>Tonia
> >
>=20

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 11:32:48 +0000 (GMT)
From: Sainey Keita <S.Keita@reading.ac.uk>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: new member
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.96.980127112807.8609B-100000@suma3.reading.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/PLAIN; charset="US-ASCII"


Hi list manager,

I wish to introduce a friend to the bantata. His name is Mbemba
Dahada and his e-mail address is aep97mad@reading.ac.uk.

Thanks inadvance,

Sainey Keita.


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 11:54:49 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Email Update
Message-ID: <199801271654.LAA15521@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

>
> By the way, it's 30+ deg. here in Milwaukee. And we have lots of snow
> cover. So Malanding, where are you located?
>
> All about the game.:)
>
> Keretha
>
>
Houghton, MI on US 41 a little south of Copper Harbor. Great place
for a Gambian to leave!!

malanding

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 11:15:26 -0800
From: "Morro krubally" <jamba@cyberramp.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
Message-ID: <199801271714.LAA21422@mailhost.cyberramp.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Ancha:
Amusing is not the word, but for lack of a better word it will suffice.
But I will tell you I was blown by it. On the other hand, it is serves to
remind me of the continues existence of ignorance about the Black people.
I won't further validate the ignoramus mind of the man by a commentary.
I think Tonia in D.C. said more than enough to respond to "mr. Educator
himself " his ignorance notwithstanding.
For you Ancha, Thank you for the forward.
Morro.


----------
> From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
> Date: Monday, January 26, 1998 6:16 PM
>
> I thought this was very interesting and wanted to know what everyone had
> to say about it!! I personally found it amusing and afterwards, my
> room-mates and I started calling each other male names!! You'll
> understand why after you've read the article.
> Happy Eid in advance to everyone and I hope everyone is doing great!!!
> Ancha.
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 15:49:55 -0500 (EST)
> From: Marsha Wynter <mwynter@golden.net>
> To: wynt3940@mach1.wlu.ca
> Subject: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!]
>
>
> >>Good Morning All,
> >>
> >>Below is an article written by a misguided Caucasian student at
Cornell.
> >>Though I find the overtone of the letter to be extremely superficial
> >>(especially when he eludes to the fact that he is trying to assist in
> >>educating us, imagine that?) it is always interesting to read
expressions
> >>like the one below. Respond in kind if the spirit hits you. I know I
> >will. >Thanks for passing the info on Kim, and sorry for any
duplications!
> >>
> >>Have a pleasant day!!
> >
> >
> >>>>>> "black/white, asian/white dating disparities"
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Let me clear the issue up -- bear with me, this will be lengthy.
> >>>>>> First of all, there is a HUGE disparity in Asian/white dating.
MANY
> >>>>>> MORE white male/asian female couples exist, relative to asian
> >>>>>> male/white female couples. The same dispairty exists, even in
greater
> >>>>>> numbers, with black men and white women. 94% of black/white
couples
> >>>>>> involve a black man and white woman. Some facts that will come
into
> >>>>>> play -- about 3.5% of the U.S. population is Asian. About 12.7% of

> >the >>>>> population is African. I'm not opposed to interracial dating,
> >however, >>>>> there are some issues. Black women and Asian men (and
to a
> >lesser >>>>> extent,whitemen) are definitely getting the "short end of
the
> >stick",
> >>>>>> from a dating perspective. Why?.....
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Trust me, (tell it like it is), the problem lies within black
women.
> >>>>>> This is not a racist comment. Black women, on the whole, are not
> >>>>>> preceived as being "feminine" and "attractive" (by the Western
> >World's
> >>>>>> standards) by a majority of males. Many perceive them as being
> >>>>>> "manly", with characteristics such as a deeper voice, shorter
hair,
> >>>>>> more bodily hair, baggy clothes, and a lack of sexiness and
> >>>>>> flirtaciousness. It's the nature of a man to consider overall
> >>>>>> attractiveness when chossing a date, and looks is a great part of

> >>>>>> this.This has compelled may black men to look for a white woman to
> >>>>>> date. Consequently, many black males, which compromise a
significant
> >>>>>> segment of the population, date white women. This leaves white
males
> >>>>>> with no choice. Many, in an effort to releive their lonlieness,
date
> >>>>>> Asian females. This leaves Asian males with the short end of the
> >stick >>>>> along with black females. Due to the fact the African
> >population is >>>>> much greater than the Asian population, white males

> >are also left out
> >>>>>> to a lesser extent. Black females have the highest rate of
> >>>>>> singularity of any ethnic/gender group in our country, and it's
> >>>>>> precisely due to their lack of softness and feminity both in
> >>>>>> personality and appearance. This isn't a racist, mean comment --
it's
> >>>>>> one meant to educate and help lonely people. If you really want to

> >>>>>> read more into this, look at the "general forum" -- I have many
> >>>>>> postings in there. The solution? Many would fret at that word
--
> >>>>>> "solution", claiming I think interracial dating is a "problem"
> >needing >>>>> to be "solved". Well, I feel that there are too many
lonely
> >people
> >>>>>> out there who need a partner -- and should have one --
> >>>>>> and yes, I perceive these disparities as a problem. Black women
have
> >>>>>> to shed their "macho" "masculine" and unattractive character and
> >>>>>> appearance. This will compel black men to actually ENJOY dating
black
> >>>>>> women, which will mean more white women for whit emen, which will
> >mean >>>>> more asian women for asian men. There will be many less
lonely
> >people >>>>> in the world -- and it all stems from the masculinity of
the
> >black >>>>> female. Sorry, I know I'll offend some, but in my heart I
know
> >I'm not >>>>> a racist, and it's for the better -- and I'm not afraid
to
> >take any >>>>> irrational heat. Many will agree with me, however. Anyone

> >willing to >>>>> discuss this with me can email me at jw43@cornell.edu,

> >and I'll >>>>> gladly reply.
> >>>>>> Thanks,
> >>>>>> Jason
> >>>>>> (p.s., I'm a white male, with a white girlfriend!)
> >>>>>> by J
> >
> >Now for the response........
> >
> >>The response from a woman named
> >>"Tonia" tells it like it is, was and forever will be
> >>
> >>
> >>> ---------------------------------------------
> >>>Jason,
> >>>I appreciate your honesty and your opinion. I am a black woman and
I'm
> >>>not the
> >>>least bit offended. I attribute your perspective to a lack of
exposure.
> >>>I
> >>>realize that only age, maturity and an introduction to what YOU'VE
been
> >>>missing
> >>>out on will change that. I will only entertain your ignorance for a
> >>>moment,
> >>>but feel free to reply and we'll keep the dialogue going!
> >>>I live in Washington, DC and I have never had a problem finding a man!

> >>>What
> >>>'short stick' are you talking about! Don't fool yourself into thinking

> >>>that
> >>>white men aren't attracted to us just because you aren't. Black men
> >>>love
> >>>us;
> >>>Asian men are fascinated by our mystery; African men admire our
> >>>strength,
> >>>intellect, and confidence; Latin men adore our curves, sensuality, and

> >>>rhythm;
> >>>Italian men savor our style and the variety in our shades; Brits enjoy

> >>>our
> >>>quick
> >>>wit and zest for life; Australians love our good conversation and love

> >>>for
> >>>good
> >>>beer (okay my love for good beer); and I could go on and on! It's only

> >>>white
> >>>'American' men that admire us secretly. You watch us at work, at
> >>>school,
> >>>in the
> >>>street and you want to get to know us, but your shame won't allow it.
> >>>You
> >>>too
> >>>are fascinated by the mystic. You like the way our brown skin
glistens
> >>>on
> >>>your
> >>>pale white... when we shake your hand, that is! Short hair is sexy
and
> >>>deep
> >>>voices are sensual... ask your grand-dad!
> >>>Black women, my dear, are known nurturers. While your mothers,
> >>>grandmothers and
> >>>great-grands sat and drank tea... we were feeding you, teaching you...

> >>>we
> >>>raised
> >>>you! But there's no need to get philosophical on ya... let's keep it
to
> >>>the here and now!
> >>> HardCopy Listing of 'ALL NOTEBOOK' for MITCHELC
> >>>Page 4
> >>>My advice to you dear is to stop watching Jenny Jones, Cops, and Ricky

> >>>Lake...
> >>>the sistahs that you see on TV, are not representative of the masses.
> >>>The
> >>>sistahs in my circle wouldn't know a pair of baggy jeans if they
slapped
> >>>them in the face. Charm and flirt are our middle names.
> >>>Validate your research with some exposure. Take your blinders off and
> >>>feed
> >>>your igonorance. There's an entire world that YOU are missing out
on!
> >>>Peace and Blessings,
> >>>Tonia
> >
>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 19:53:05 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New member and Eid mubarak
Message-ID: <19980127185406.AAA56248@nijii>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Greetings,
Alagie Babou Njie has been added to the Bantaba. Welcome on board Mr.
Njie. You can send a brief introduction to gambia-l@u.washington.edu.


Eid Mubarak in advance to everyone and may God accept our prayers
and forgive us all our sins done by mistake or ignorantly.

Momodou Camara


*******************************************************
http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara

**"Start by doing what's necessary, then what's
possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible"***

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 20:51:11 +0200
From: "lamin" <wintersu@dlc.fi>
To: "Gambia-l" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Unsubscribe
Message-ID: <199801271852.UAA29521@elf.dlc.fi>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

List Managers,
I would appreciate if you could temporary unsubseribe me until further
notice.
With kind regards
Lamin Jammeh

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 20:26:10 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New Member
Message-ID: <19980127192710.AAA62452@nijii>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Greetings,
Hamadi Banna has been added to the Bantaba. Welcome on board Hamadi,
you can send a brief introduction to gambia-l@u.washington.edu.

Eid Mubarak in advance!

Momodou Camara


*******************************************************
http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara

**"Start by doing what's necessary, then what's
possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible"***

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 13:31:35 PST
From: "NJAGA JAGNE" <jagnen25@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: sutura and other wolof words
Message-ID: <19980127213137.28516.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

hi malanding, heidi, and bantabaa-nkool0,
i cannot but help but join in this discussion. i know
some of my fellow l-ers will be mad at me for not talking to
them for so long nad suddenky, out of the blue, heidi draws
me. she has this magic wand.......uuuhhh huuuuhhhh ... anyway,
i think you all got it pretty much covered and i had to
read through to find anything i could elaborate on. you are
amazing heidi....this could become a hobby of mine..
*********************
maalang said....
>I think I can safely say that "sutura" in
>mandingka is "suturo". as in "Mo nyang ta suturo sotolaleh". perhaps
very much teh same as "sutura" in wollof.
> Please don't ask me who gets it from who?
>Malanding Jaiteh
>****************************
i hope nobody asks, and i wish somebody knows. to me however,
this serves to strenghten the fact that we might all have in
common, more; much more, than we think or belief. much of the
mandinka language has an o' at the end of most words depending
on tense and usage.
**************************
>> Hello,
>> I am wondering if anybody can help translating or explaining some,
for me, "difficult" >> Wolof words, namely sutura, teranga and ruus. (Do
they have Mandinka >> counterparts?).......
>>
>> In another context a woman praised living in Bakau and said "Bakau
>> moi suma sutura" (Bakau is my "sutura")
>> Can somebody explain a bit more what this implies?
*****************
my take on this.....this woman could have been saying that
bakau is good to her. she could be getting a lot from Bakau
that she would not expect to get anywhere else. thus bakau
being her "sutura". out of bakau, she could be "sutura"-less.
it would have helped if she had said why it is her
sutura.........moving on
******************************
>> And somebody who "nyaka faida" or "nyaka joom" are respectless ...
**********************************
heidy,
these two words (or phrases as you used them) as quite
diffirent and distinct from each other as i know them.
sometimes, i am amazed at how much you know, and then i am
pinched at some of your classic mistakes. but then i realize
that you were not born and raised in the Gambia to realize
the real meaning and context or connotations of some sayings,
words, etc......i was raised on "faida" and "jom". ofcourse,
among a lot of other things, incliding "maalo" (rice). "faida"
is a sense of direction and purpose than one has; "one's own
mind", if you will. one who has this 'faida" doesn't let
anybody, at anytime, do anything to them, or make them do
anything. to ignore the unimportant stuff and to plough
through distractions is some faida. one who might be bent one
way, but not another like a "basang" -as my mum says- and
not like a "malaan".
"jom" is (to me), a sense of pride. not to let down
yourself or your people. jom is a sense of right and wrong.
a sense of shame. this is one of the things that i miss about
my homeland. i see and experience things here that are
abominable. "jom" and "faida" are stuff that that are lacking
in animals...beasts. thus to be "faida"-less and "jom"-less is
to be purposeless and shameless, like a goat, dog, cow, etc.
ofcourse, these are all relative. who determines what a shame
or purpose is???????....
************************
>> I hope some of you will have time to share your thoughts on the
>> subject, in spite of the busy time schedules everybody seems to
have.
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Heidi Skramstad
**********************************
i would really have liked to delve more into this, but as
you know, i am scared to look at the clock now. i am just
gonna get up and go to class for another two and a half
hours. maybe we will talk more about this later privately.....
NJAGA JAGNE.......A BIG SMILE TO THE
BANTABA.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 16:41:12 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: An alternative strategy for macro-economic development (A vision without a realistic foundation is a castle built in thin air)
Message-ID: <199801272141.QAA15719@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Once again I will thank the PDOIS team for sending this article to
gambia-l. It certainly shows partisan politics is still alive and well
the "old Gambia way"!
I want experts(economists) to clarify a few things for me before I can
make meaningful contribution?
Mr Sallah mentioned of growing government borrowing despite the fact
that we are spending over 40% of our GDP on debt servicing. What is
the implication of this growing debt on the value and stability of the
Dalasi? Is there any real danger of the Dalasi loosing value like the
Ruppiah of Indonesia(one of hte former Tigers/***** cats?).

What is the danger of borrowing to finance infrastructural development?
Afterall thats what every country does!
know that we need schools, roads, ports, hospitals and bridges do we leave
leave them until we can afford it (a strategy used by hte former
government i suppose)? What would that mean for the country as opposed to
incurring the loans?

Perhaps another area to save although not directly mentioned by Mr
Sallah is the Army and the Presidency. I happen to watch a video recording
of the Jammeh inauguration and the '97 Independence celebration. It
beats me how much we are spending on the Army, the Guards and all the
armour cars and escorts.

Malanding



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 17:10:12 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Re: sutura and other wolof words
Message-ID: <199801272210.RAA06807@oak.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Njaga,
I am learning alot. Heidi just learnt from my wife a better bi-lingual
than I that Teranga is Buu-nyaa and the closest english word to "sutura"
is PRIVACY. Hope it helps.

malanding

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 19:29:43 EST
From: SANG1220 <SANG1220@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Ignorance
Message-ID: <acaa8532.34ce7bf8@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Ancha, that was indeed insigthful, I suspect the author is just a laddy who
have not been in the real world, thus his attitude. Tania, said it best, white
men admire black women from afar but are either scared to talk to them or
worry what their friends think about them if they venture in "unchaired"
territory.
Thanks
Daddy Sang

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 21:47:05 EST
From: ELLA23K <ELLA23K@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [Fwd: Fwd: Is This Ignorance Or What!!!] (fwd)
Message-ID: <d6557b33.34ce9c00@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Hi Ancha,
you have put it to the fool quite nicely and if he( or maybe he is an it)
should read it will try to educate himself on the issue, but i doubt it. You
kit fascinates them that we do not show how beautiful we are by wearing those
trashy looking clothes and going aboutusing the foulest language-instead we
carry ourselves maturely and very diplomatically. We are well educated and
have a lot of common sense which is not so common among his type. He should
talk to the few American peace corps that have been to Africa and they might
share with him the rich beauty and love black women in general have.

Anyway let the fool speack and the wise give no answer. We are more matured
than that and he has had enough attention to his ignorance.

Once again thanks for the enlightenment and good luck

Cecilia.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 23:54:39 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Fw: Watch Out: Globalisation is Re-drawing Africa's Borders (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.980127233707.13354A-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Hi Folks, On Njaaraama!

Back on line, and happy to be on the Bantaba again-thanks to Momodou.

I will tell you the story...

Meanwhile, here is something you might be interested in reading. Rather pessimistic, which is the problem I have
with it (I am an incurable, 'Afro-optimist'!!!);but, all the same, interesting and
thought-provoking.

Back soon, with more stuff.

Enjoy the Korite and Ndewennatti!

Ebrima.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 14:14:31 +0100
From: Thandika Mkandawire <i31776@inet.uni-c.dk>
To: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
Subject: Fw: Watch Out: Globalisation is Re-drawing Africa's Borders


>Watch Out: Globalisation is Re-drawing Africa's Borders
>
>January 27, 1998
>
>Felix 'Machi Njoku, PANA Correspondent
>
>DAKAR, Senegal (PANA) - In 1885, European powers assembled in the German
city of Berlin to carve out chunks of African
>territories for themselves.
>
>As this century turns the corner, a repeat has been set in motion though
not in the manner of another daggers-drawn scramble
>for a continent some prefer to call the last frontier.
>
>This time, there are no gun powder and rum, no bibles and preachers. In
short, in the place of a civilising agent, you have a
>vague phenomenon called globalisation , let loose on poor countries even as
its minders try to get a true picture of the monster
>they created.
>
>The Leviathan seems to have seized the global village and taken its
inhabitants hostage. Henceforth, the law of the jungle reigns
>supreme and only the strong can escape from its clutches.
>
>The world has learnt as much following ongoing turbulence in the world
Economy.
>
>This has so rattled the famed Asian Tigers of late that African countries
who were told to copy the Asiatics have almost given
>up. The brief artificial Afro-Optimism of the last couple of years is again
giving way to darker pessimism, most manifest in
>speeches made by some African leaders at the beginning of the year.
>
>For instance, in early January, Ghanaian President Jerry Rawlings predicted
a tough economic year for his country, exhorting his
>people to work extra-hard to counter external forces which threaten the
country's development.
>
>We cannot yet be sure of the extent to which this (gobalisation) will
affect the inflow of foreign investment into our economy, or
>the degree to which the negative aspects of an increasingly troubled world
economy will impact on us, he said.
>
>Never mind that the west African country is host to one of the world's
largest gold reserves or that Ashanti Goldfields Company
>is quoted on the London and New York stock markets. Besides, Accra has
implemented all the economic and democratic
>reforms in the books that made it the darling of the multilateral finance
institutions.
>
>Beyond and above this, serious development economists are not sure if any
African country will go into the next millennium with
>the slightest hope of a bright prospect for the future.
>
>The political, economic and social instability in almost all African
countries south of the Sahara at this point in time seems to
>support this theory.
>
>If recent pictures of street battles between soldiers and ordinary folk in
Zimbabwe over the price on basic commodities do not
>tell the story, then what would? Is it the sorry sight of kid-soldiers in
bathroom slippers totting AK-47 rifles in central Africa or
>the gory sight of slit throats in the back streets of Algiers.
>
>In today's Africa, it appears acceptable that any thug can mortgage his
country's meagre resources for arms and use them to
>dislodge an elected government from power in the name of the free market.
>
>The prospects are frightening and at the same time incomprehensible, says
Achille Mbembe, Executive Secretary of the
>Dakar-based Council for the Development of Social Science Research.
>
>How are we to characterise these African times we are living in? Mbembe
asked in a lecture on New Economic Frontiers in
>Africa he gave at the UN African Institute For Economic Development and
Planning, also based in the Senegalese capital.
>
>The continent is moving in multiple directions simultaneously and at
varying speeds and levels that defy characterisation, noted
>Mbembe, a Cameroonian history professor.
>
>He said the colonial period was easy to characterise since everyone knew
what the problem was. After that period, things
>began to look bad. They became murky in the 1980s and even murkier in the
1990s, as the twin effects of political
>democratisation and economic liberalisation began to bite harder. Now it is
a dare devil situation.
>
>The conditions imposed on African countries today are more or less similar
to conditions imposed on Germany and Japan after
>World War II, Mbembe said.
>
>Given this scenario one begins to wonder if liberalisation was not supposed
to open up the economy, spread wealth across the
>broad spectrum of society. Was it not supposed to improve the peoples
standard of living in an all inclusive political process
>where the people themselves decided who should rule them?.
>
>These have hardly been the case. Privatisation has become a synonym for
corporate greed, while elections are easily
>programmed to determine the winner.
>
>At the same time, aid promised to countries implementing political and
economic liberalisation have failed to materialise. Debts
>are not being cancelled even in cases where it is obvious that the debtor
countries can't pay up.
>
>Foreign Private investment, the prime mover of globalisation continues to
skip Africa as if parts of the continent were leprous.
>Where they show up, it is to hastily dip up underground minerals which are
spirited away to the metropolis leaving the countries
>much worse than they were before.
>
>The Archbishop of Canterbury, George Carey, had cause to question the
morality of rich countries on some of these issues
>during a recent visit to Ethiopia, when he reportedly urged Western nations
and the multilateral finance institutions to cancel
>Africa's 235 billion dollars debt.
>
>In an emotional speech entitled Chains Around Africa: Crisis or Hope for
the New Millennium , he told the diplomatic
>community in Addis Ababa last week the debt burden could only be likened to
a new form of slavery. Western nations, he said,
>had the moral obligation to solve this crisis induced by the huge debt
because of their colonial legacy which create many
>problems that did not previously exist.
>
>He noted that 40 million dollars were being drained from African everyday
in debt servicing alone, pointing out that for every
>one dollar given in aid, three dollars are returned in debt service. The
extent to which the chains of indebtedness was
>contributing to the overall problems of Africa and the sufferings of her
people simply cannot be overestimated, he added.
>
>Analysts are not sure if such calls really make any impact, considering
that Pope John Paul II made a similar call some years
>back. Morality and economics do not rob, they argue. Rather, what seems to
scare the movers of the free market, especially
>the Bretton Woods circles, is the global impact of resistance against
adjustment measures as was the case recently in
>Zimbabwe.
>
>Some people feel that fear of this imminent time bomb prompted the
reform-minded president of the World Bank, James
>Wolfensohn, to initiate his rather belated damage control operation for a
humane approach to development.
>
>At the last annual general meeting of the bank and the IMF in Hong Kong,
Wolfensohn acknowledged the bank's past mistakes,
>saying the time has come to get back to the dream of inclusive development.
>
>What we are seeing in the world today is the tragedy of exclusion. Whether
you broach it from the social or economic or moral
>perspective, this is a challenge we cannot afford to ignore, he said. But
we must recognise that we are living with a time bomb
>and unless we take action now, it could explode in our children's faces.
>
>Michel Camdesus, the IMF chief, also spoke about the responsibility of
industrial countries to help minimise the social and
>cultural costs of integration into the global economy.
>
>However, for African countries, these amount to mere lip service when
compared to the profound crises that would take years
>of concerted action to reverse.
>
>The issue is that many African economies have been so hard hit that some of
them would simply be swallowed up by more
>fortunate neighbours. The economic frontiers of some states will encroach
into smaller neighbours which would continue shrink,
>Mbembe noted in his lecture.
>
>He added: The entanglement of Africa is likely to lead to the fragmentation
of public authority and the emergence of private
>indirect government.
>
>Then, the bottom line is that many African countries would revert to the
post-Atlantic slave trade era where trade by barter
>would replace monetised economy.
>
>Even so, Mbembe believes that Africans are resilient enough to turn into
themselves and like the mythical Phoenix, rise again
>from their ashes.
>
>But wait a minute: There may yet be other eminent companions in the journey
to oblivion if American writer William Greider's
>new book on globalistion is to believed.
>
>He says: One world, ready or not, globalisation is a machine with skillful
hands on board but no body at the wheels. In fact, the
>machine has no wheels nor any internal governor to control the wheel and
direction. It is sustained by its own forward motion,
>guided mainly by its own appetite. And it is accelerating.
>
>
>
> Copyright (c) 1998 Panafrican News Agency. All
Rights Reserved.
>Gervasio Gabriel Kaliwo
>Tel. (00-33-1-45684209)
>Fax (00-33-1-45685585)
>GKaliwo@UNESCO.ORG
>
>***********************
>* TO POST TO THE LIST *
>***********************
>send your article to NYASANET@MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU
>


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 21:27:05 PST
From: "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: new member
Message-ID: <19980128052705.19638.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Greetings:
Mbemba Dahada has been added to the list. Welcome to our bantaba and
please send an intro. to the group (~300 members) when you have time.
Our address is: gambia-l@u.washington.edu

LatJor

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 13:22:34 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: "gambia-l@u.washington.edu" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: (no subject)
Message-ID: <34D0C8EA.6E88@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

To all the brothers and sisters in Gambia-l
Eid is confirmed as per attachment below
Happy Eid
Habib


info wrote:
>
> Assalam alaikum,
>
> The crescent for the new moon of Shawwal was not sighted (with the eye) by
> Muslims anywhere across the world today. Therefore we continue to fast
> tomorrow (Wednesday) to complete the 30 days.
>
> Thursday 29th January will be the day of Eid al-Fitr.
>
> We take this opportunity to say Eid Mubarak to all Muslims!
>
> We would also like to take this opportunity to thank you for your time in
> supporting http://www.ramadhan.org and hope that you return often to this
> site which we plan to continue for the rest of the year (with leaflets and audio
> material on topical/vital subjects).
>
> Other sites which we draw to your attention include http://www.khilafah.com
> and http://www.hizb-ut-tahrir.org

--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 98 07:01:04 UT
From: "Anthony Loum" <sambabalangarr@classic.msn.com>
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New member
Message-ID: <UPMAIL08.199801280654580928@classic.msn.com>



Yassin Jobe has been added to the list. We welcome her and are looking forward
to her introduction and contributions.

Thanks

Tony Loum


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 23:55:29 PST
From: "Momodou Camara" <nijii@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Gro Harlem Brundtland Elected WHO Director-General
Message-ID: <19980128075529.22516.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

January 27, 1998

GENEVA, Switzerland (PANA) - Former Norwegian prime minister Gro Harlem
Brundtland was elected on Tuesday as Director-General of the World
Health Organisation (WHO), a position for which she was competing with
several other candidates, including Africa's
candidate, Dr Ebrahim Malick Samba of Gambia.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 10:54:51 + 0100 MET
From: "Alpha Robinson" <garob1@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
Message-ID: <5AA62C3AFD@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Bass,

As HAlifa stated in his posting, the issue of the national economy is
a matter which "requires more than common sense economics.... It requires
intellectual honesty on the part of decision makers and their
fidelity to propositions that are fully grounded on irrefutable
premises." I would like to add that this issue is a matter of life
and death. If we choose to solve it creatively we can guarantee ourselves and
our children a meaningful life under the earth, if we choose to be
otherwise we will remain the scum of the earth (please excuse my
language)

Bass heed those words for they are very crucial especially to us the
"cream of Africa". We the educated ones cannot allow ourselves to
indulde in intellectual dishonesty for the hopes of our people are on
our shoulders.

Bass PDOIS had stated earlier, well before Jammeh's days in its
manifesto what its stand on the private sector is and this is exactly
what Halifa reflected on the posting. PDOIS says come private
investment well and good but we should not fold our hands and wait
for it. Now if you go about calling PDOIS a" socialist or
Semi-Socialist party and that as a result the economic strategy it is
now putting forward and confidently portraying as the only cure for
the economic ailment of our nation are a direct product of Marxian
Econnomic analysis which is by default hostile to market forces" it
makes me really wonder on two counts:
First, I wonder whether you have made any efforts to know what PDOIS'
economic policy is.
Secondly, I wonder what you were really up to when all of a sudden
the cold war jargon downs on you from God knows where. It's awkward
because in Halifa's analysis neither Socialism nor Marxism was
mentioned.

As I hate to speculate, I'll leave it to you to answer or not answer
as you like. One thing is certain though. In your contribution you
haven't provided any alternative. To say that the way should be paved
for private investors is so cheap that I would not like to believe
this is all you have to offer the Gambian people.

Finally, let us be alerrt to the fact that the development of the
Gambia entails more than enriching a few educated Gambians. Our people
Bass, the vast majority of the Gambian people are living in
deplorable conditions. Therefore any policy which attempts to
sideline them cannot be a meaningful one. Perhaps it is time Bass for
you, me and our likes, the educated Gambians to realise that ALL the
Gambian people want to have a better life. I am sure if you were not
lucky to be educated you would heve been talking differently today.
If you were a farmer earning ONLY one thousand Dalasis or two PER
ANNUM you would not be telling us that theMONTHLY salaries of members of perliament
SEVEN THOUSAND Dalasis is meagre. If you were an unlucky farmer, you
would not have been saying that the resources of the country should
be given to a few Gambians to enjoy.

Finally, I would like to add that one does not have to study economics
to understand certain very basic things. Of course a person who
studies economics is more likely to be exposed to economic issue. I
would like to conted here and now though that he who makes it a
priority can also become conversat with economic issues without
holding a degree in it. Remember that Malcolm X, one of the most
influencial African Americans, did not posses any
degree in any of the issues he was very eloquent in. Knowlwdge
belongs only to those who sought it, so it is nonesense to think that
only economic graduates can talk about economic issues.

much respect

Alpha

------------------------------

Date: 28 Jan 1998 12:34:42 +0100
From: Ba-Musa Ceesay <Ba-Musa.Ceesay@Oslo.Norad.telemax.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu (Receipt notification requested)
Cc: GAMBIA-L <x400@NORAD.telemax.no> (Receipt notification requested)
Subject: (Fwd) Message from Momodou Buhary Gassama
Message-ID: <post.ut34cf1685*/c=NO/admd=Telemax/prmd=Norad/o=Oslo/s=Ceesay/g=Ba-Musa/@MHS>
Content-Identifier: post.ut34cf1685
Content-Return: Prohibited


I have not been active so far this year because I
travelled
to Oslo for the holidays.(Where incidentally, the problem of tribalism
is as big a problem as anywhere else. I learnt that there were two
organisations - the Gambian organisation and one for Mandinkas. There
is a Muslim association within which tribalism is playing a big role.
Maybe those list members in Oslo can expand on the issue).



Buhary,

As an interest and cultural organisation the Gambian Association in Oslo
is a collective endevour and it`s main objectives are to promote the
cultural identity and the social well being of all Gambians in Norway.
Gambians as individuals have primary interest and aspirations which
are some times in conflict with those of the collective endevour.These
conflicts of interest and aspirations between individuals and the
collective endevour may be the main source of misunderstanding between
Gambians generally including the association.

Yes, there are two organisations in Oslo but as we were told the
objectives are different. Is the other organisation only for mandinkas, I
don`t think so eventhough I am not a member I believe any wollof, jola
etc can be a member of that organisation. BTW some members of that
socalled mandika group are also members of the Gambian Association and pay
their subscriptions regurlarly, attend meetings and activities organise by
the Association.

There is a great deal of misunderstanding between Gambians and it is not
unsual for members of any community to have some misunderstandings or
disagreements over certain issues from time to time.Some Gambians have the
impression or opinion that programs of the Gambian association are
controlled and managed by a few individuals. Others are just plain
jealous, while others see the Association as unfriendly and insensitive
that favours certain inviduals and activities at the expence of others.
The Gambian Association had been one of the most active immigrant
organisations in Oslo (if not the only). The association achieve a lot
since it was formed by a group of Gambian seamen in the late 60`s. However
tribalism or should I call it urban and rural differences created an
atmosphere that is not welcome by the majority of the Gambians out here.
But the hope is that an open and honest communication will bring mutual
understanding among us. To build a healthy Gambian community we need to
talk and listen to each other.

I have been the secretary of both the Gambian association and Islamic
movement for many years but my observation within the Islamic movement
lately is that only a few individuals who are contributing little to the
welfare of the mosque (and with the help of rumourmongers) are
exaggerating the extend of the problem. Yes there are problems but are all
the problems tribalistic, No.


Regards
Ba-Musa








------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 12:58:16 +0100
From: Svend Ole Kvilesjo <svendok@online.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Fulani-lessons in Oslo?
Message-ID: <34CF1D57.C498A1F1@online.no>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi!

I wonder if some of you know any person in Oslo capable and willing to
teach me som fulani.(Two hours once a week?) Since I have most of my
Gambian friends in Bansang/Basse-area, I would like to speak more than
mandinka only.

If somebody else want to join me in the lessons, (gambians or toubabs)
plase let me know.

Svend Ole Kvilesjoe
Freelance journalist & photographer
www.kvilesjo.no/gallery.htm
svendok@online.no


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 00:29:57 -0000
From: "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
Message-ID: <B0000044179@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Pa Musa Jallow" <pmj@commit.gm>
via Commit


Dear Bass Dodou,
I want to again commend you again on a superb piece most especially on the
"been there" and "done that" of public corporations..it is like the saying
that "the road to hell is paved with good intentions". Some of us remember
the good ole days of PWD and GPMB and GUC when everyone was employed in the
"general do nothing". There is no doubt that the RETRENCHMENT during the
ERP was much needed..after all GOVT. is not an EMPLOYER but the bare
minimum employed at OUR COST FOR OUR COMMON GOOD. It is also important to
note that D7000 has the value today as D2400 in 1984 and even less
purchasing power...there is no doubt that unless we pay a decent livable
wage, we will only attract mediocres to run our institutions and not the
best..and CORRUPTIOn or the NEED for it will continue unabated..and GOVT.
or PUBLIC SERVICE now faces a growing challenge from a budding PRIVATE
SECTOR. The floating and devaluation of the dalasi from D5-to the Pound to
now about D17- to the POUNd required adjustment of wages.
so in principle I support a full readjustment of wages for civil or public
servants and also streamlining the numbers to the bare minimum necessary.
However I am quite worried about increased govt. taxes and borrowing and I
am speaking from a vantage point..businesses are now being taxed to the
extent that tax evasion is a must for survival..besides a pre-tax,
increased registration etc..there is now a 10% on turnover called
WITHHOLDING tax for service contractors and in 1998, a new D10,000 Services
LEVY..I have to go now but I will add further comments later..
anyway I commend BAss on his fine article
pmj

----------

>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 15:11:07 +0100
From: LaminLams.Bojang@fco.mh.se (LaminLams Bojang)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: ORGANIATIONS
Message-ID: <msg176394.thr-19e8b5.f5472@fco.mh.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
Content-ID: <msg176394.thr-19e8b5.f5472.part0@fco.mh.se>

Are we giving the blame of the multiplying interest organisation to the
conflicts within individuals and tribes or is it a result of the
developments of the pioneer Gambian organisations?

Why is it wrong to be organized in tribal ,areal or interest groups
now? These organisations have there roots back home and they are more
positive there(at home) than negative.
Organisations and the people live in a symbios. The organisations need
members to be an organisation. People need the organisations to fulfill
their dreams ,needs, desires or whatever.
We cannot expect the people to stay in organisations that do not
match their aims and objectives. These people should have the chance as
anybody to form or join other organisations that serves their interest.
These small organisations should be seen as a positive development
because it engages many people in different activities and in special
areas of organizing.
It might be more interesting to look into the factors that contribute
to the increasing interest organisations, than to condemn them.
Sure there are negative as well as positve aspects within these
organisations, but will these be eradicated when great central
organisations(which have many specialities)
are created?

Lams

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 12:02:38 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gro Harlem Brundtland Elected WHO Director-General
Message-ID: <34CF64AE.9FA@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Momodou Camara wrote:
>
> January 27, 1998
>
> GENEVA, Switzerland (PANA) - Former Norwegian prime minister Gro Harlem
> Brundtland was elected on Tuesday as Director-General of the World
> Health Organisation (WHO), a position for which she was competing with
> several other candidates, including Africa's
> candidate, Dr Ebrahim Malick Samba of Gambia.
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

I wish Dr Samba all the best and hopefully next time he will get it.
At least Gambia had a top level candidate( about five from the whole
world)
Habib
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 20:14:14 -0800
From: MOMODOU BUHARRY GASSAMA <m.gassama@swipnet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: (Fwd) Message from Momodou Buhary Gassama
Message-ID: <34D00216.653@swipnet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Ba-Musa!
Thanks for throwing some light on the situation in Oslo. I hope
that the brothers and sisters in Oslo will have "open and honest
communication" that will foster mutual understanding. Afterall, divisive
factors such as tribalism, urban-rural differences etc. cannot but hurt
the Gambian cause in Norway. Once again, thanks for the "from base"
analysis. I hope like you said that we as Gambians everywhere will
realise the fact that "we need to talk and listen to each other" in
order to build healthy communities both outside and inside The Gambia.
Buharry.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ba-Musa Ceesay wrote:
>
> I have not been active so far this year because I
> travelled
> to Oslo for the holidays.(Where incidentally, the problem of tribalism
> is as big a problem as anywhere else. I learnt that there were two
> organisations - the Gambian organisation and one for Mandinkas. There
> is a Muslim association within which tribalism is playing a big role.
> Maybe those list members in Oslo can expand on the issue).
>
> Buhary,
>
> As an interest and cultural organisation the Gambian Association in Oslo
> is a collective endevour and it`s main objectives are to promote the
> cultural identity and the social well being of all Gambians in Norway.
> Gambians as individuals have primary interest and aspirations which
> are some times in conflict with those of the collective endevour.These
> conflicts of interest and aspirations between individuals and the
> collective endevour may be the main source of misunderstanding between
> Gambians generally including the association.
>
> Yes, there are two organisations in Oslo but as we were told the
> objectives are different. Is the other organisation only for mandinkas, I
> don`t think so eventhough I am not a member I believe any wollof, jola
> etc can be a member of that organisation. BTW some members of that
> socalled mandika group are also members of the Gambian Association and pay
> their subscriptions regurlarly, attend meetings and activities organise by
> the Association.
>
> There is a great deal of misunderstanding between Gambians and it is not
> unsual for members of any community to have some misunderstandings or
> disagreements over certain issues from time to time.Some Gambians have the
> impression or opinion that programs of the Gambian association are
> controlled and managed by a few individuals. Others are just plain
> jealous, while others see the Association as unfriendly and insensitive
> that favours certain inviduals and activities at the expence of others.
> The Gambian Association had been one of the most active immigrant
> organisations in Oslo (if not the only). The association achieve a lot
> since it was formed by a group of Gambian seamen in the late 60`s. However
> tribalism or should I call it urban and rural differences created an
> atmosphere that is not welcome by the majority of the Gambians out here.
> But the hope is that an open and honest communication will bring mutual
> understanding among us. To build a healthy Gambian community we need to
> talk and listen to each other.
>
> I have been the secretary of both the Gambian association and Islamic
> movement for many years but my observation within the Islamic movement
> lately is that only a few individuals who are contributing little to the
> welfare of the mosque (and with the help of rumourmongers) are
> exaggerating the extend of the problem. Yes there are problems but are all
> the problems tribalistic, No.
>
> Regards
> Ba-Musa

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 15:01:16 EST
From: BobbySil <BobbySil@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
Message-ID: <3c1bd756.34cf8e8e@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

List members,

I am really surprised that nobody is talking about the alleged sex scandal
involving President Clinton. Is this been avoided because it deals with sex
and generally in our Gambian culture, this topic is always pushed under the
rug, never to be discussed, or could it be the "Ramadan." Sorry, but I was
taught that these things can be discussed even in the Holy month. How can it
be avoided, its on TV 24/7, on front pages of every major news papers, and on
our very own internet. Oh, I know what, it's not a Gambian issue, i.e; its not
Pres. Jammeh allegedly cheating on the first lady. Hey, I'm trying to beat
around the bush until somebody wakes me up. Ok, I'm up , lets talk about it.
What do you think?

Should the Pres. be impeached if proven that he had sex with Monica Lewinsky
and lied to cover it up? Remember water gate! If we are to continue to live in
this global village, I think we have to be globally dimensioned. Please lets
start discussing these issues and continue with those concerning our beloved
Gambia if this is to be real "Bantaba."

IMHO, I do not care who the Pres. is making out with, so long as the alleged
infidelity is not impeding his job, and I do not see any evidence of that. As
Geraldo puts it, "the American people are not worried about Monica Lewinsky or
Paula Jones, all they worry about is the DOW JONES."

Finally, if I intrude on anybody's space for bringing up this so considered
"super-sensitive issue" in Gambian context, I am extremely sorry. To the rest
of you, keep the debate on.

Happy Eid



------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 13:42:28 PST
From: "astrid christensen-tasong" <attatas@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
Message-ID: <19980128214234.9308.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain




>From gambia-l-owner@u.washington.edu Wed Jan 28 13:00:59 1998
>Received: from host (lists.u.washington.edu [140.142.56.13])
> by lists3.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
SMTP
> id MAA08696; Wed, 28 Jan 1998 12:01:59 -0800
>Received: from mxu2.u.washington.edu (mxu2.u.washington.edu
[140.142.32.9])
> by lists.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
ESMTP
> id MAA18584 for <gambia-l@lists.u.washington.edu>; Wed, 28 Jan 1998
12:01:35 -0800
>Received: from imo27.mail.aol.com (imo27.mx.aol.com [198.81.19.155])
> by mxu2.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.09) with
ESMTP
> id MAA00519 for <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>; Wed, 28 Jan 1998
12:01:34 -0800
>Message-Id: <3c1bd756.34cf8e8e@aol.com>
>Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 15:01:16 EST
>Reply-To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
>Sender: GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu
>Precedence: bulk
>From: BobbySil <BobbySil@aol.com>
>To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
>Subject: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
>Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
>X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 beta -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
>
>List members,
>
>I am really surprised that nobody is talking about the alleged sex
scandal
>involving President Clinton. Is this been avoided because it deals with
sex
>and generally in our Gambian culture, this topic is always pushed under
the
>rug, never to be discussed, or could it be the "Ramadan." Sorry, but I
was
>taught that these things can be discussed even in the Holy month. How
can it
>be avoided, its on TV 24/7, on front pages of every major news papers,
and on
>our very own internet. Oh, I know what, it's not a Gambian issue, i.e;
its not
>Pres. Jammeh allegedly cheating on the first lady. Hey, I'm trying to
beat
>around the bush until somebody wakes me up. Ok, I'm up , lets talk
about it.
>What do you think?
>
>Should the Pres. be impeached if proven that he had sex with Monica
Lewinsky
>and lied to cover it up? Remember water gate! If we are to continue to
live in
>this global village, I think we have to be globally dimensioned. Please
lets
>start discussing these issues and continue with those concerning our
beloved
>Gambia if this is to be real "Bantaba."
>
>IMHO, I do not care who the Pres. is making out with, so long as the
alleged
>infidelity is not impeding his job, and I do not see any evidence of
that. As
>Geraldo puts it, "the American people are not worried about Monica
Lewinsky or
>Paula Jones, all they worry about is the DOW JONES."
>
>Finally, if I intrude on anybody's space for bringing up this so
considered
>"super-sensitive issue" in Gambian context, I am extremely sorry. To
the rest
>of you, keep the debate on.
>
>Happy Eid
>


Hi Bobby,

I personally discuss this issue all day at work and at home. For that
reason, I'm glad that list members have been focusing on other issues.
My conclusion from the onset as The First Lady Hillary Rodham- Clinton
put it is; a vast right-wing conspiracy...which I simply call Republican
tactics.

President Clinton in my opinion is doing a fabulous job and as far as
the allegations are concerned, he is innocent till PROVEN guilty. I
also feel the media is totally out of control and are to blame in
sensationalizing this story.

regards,
Astrid

P.S. I didn't quite understand what you meant by "super sensitive"
issue in Gambian context. I'm curious!


Astrid Christensen-Tasong
email address: work: astrid@wbgh.com
home: attatas@hotmail.com


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 17:11:20 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9801281646.A27887-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII



> IMHO, I do not care who the Pres. is making out with, so long as the
> alleged
infidelity is not impeding his job, and I do not see any evidence of that.

I totally agree. I don't see what one issue has to do with the other
unless of course it is affecting his ability to do his work. Him sleeping
with who ever is a marital problem and should be treated as such.
I think the media is really bored and need to find something else to talk
about..eg why the "first" world countries are dumping toxic wastes in the
"third" world. Maybe, just maybe, they can justify it.....yeah right!!
Basically, Bill and Hillary Clinton should be allowed to handle their
marital problems in private. Yes, they're public figures and as such,
have put themselves at the mercy of the public. But most importantly, they
are human beings no matter what, and should be allowed
their privacy when what they have to discuss has nothing to do with the
running of the US.
Ancha.





------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 19:29:24 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: WHY AINT THE ECONOMIC BAND PLAYING (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.980128184424.20858C-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE

Hi Folks,
=09=09=09=09=09 =20
Here is something else. It is actually in two parts, one of which is a
reaction to the piece on Globalisation and Africa that I forwarded to you
yesterday, and the other is a comment on what someone said on the above
subject. I tried to get the original piece that the second comentator is
reacting to, but I couldn't get it. But, as you will see, the second bit
can stand on its own too, and is quite clear as it is. I think these two
pieces are also relevant to the dabate on Halifa's letter to the Secretary
of State.=20
=09=09 =20
My own view is that, as Halifa seems to suggest, it is high time we start
being more critical about some of the things that come to us from so many
different quarters, and start looking at the world from our own stand
point.=20
=09=09=09=09=09
We have a very basic problem, that of finding a way of
making life not only worth living for as many people as possible, but even
enjoyable!!! It is actually quite a shame that so many people in Africa
still have to experience 'hungry seasons', die of diseases that don't kill
anybody in, say, America or Sweden any more, or live in squalor.=20

We have seen enough of the private sector, and of the market to be able to
avoid all uncritical celebrations of either of them. Or of retrenchment
of public servants, etc. There was certainly a lot of dead wood in our civi=
l
service, but I don't see any good in the retrenchment of primary school
teachers at a time when there weren't enough of them....

If we look at the world around us, or look back into the past century
or so of world history, what we see is that whereever meaningful 'developme=
nt' has taken place, there was
a vision, carried by a strong desire to make life better and a commitment
to the countries and societies where it happened.=20
=09=09=09=09
Anyway, here are the two pieces that I think some of you might find interes=
ting...

Cheers again, and have a great Korite!

FIRST PIECE:
---------- Forwarded message ---------- Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 02:29:01
-0500 (EST) From: harey@oak.cats.ohiou.edu> To: Ebrima
Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu

=09=09
(...) About the piece on Globalisation, I think it is important to place Af=
rica's underdevelopment in a global
political-economy or historical context. I think that any attempt to
understand Africa's problems outside of a global context is trying to
solve a puzzle with only a fraction of the pieces. The comentator does not =
seem to
address the problems to which he refers from a global institutional
perspective, although he acknowledges that the global IFI are major
players. In one place, he sounds like a neo-liberal. Maybe blaming the
victim--not that all are victims to the same degree/of the same type.

I think he is totalling off in his comparison of the current relationship
of IFI to Africa, as that to Japan and Germany after WWII. I know a
different kind of history maybe. US capitalist practice toward Japan was
kind and gentle--very much UNLIKE Western capitalist extraction and
domination in Africa beginning with the TransAtlantic slave trade. And
didn't the US create the Marshall Plann for the sole purpose of rebuilding
Europe's economies (including that of Germany) of course part of the
reason was so that the US would have trade partners. And the Marshall
Plan was grants (mostly I think) not loans. That makes a substantial
difference. IFIs have treated Japan and Germany very differently for the
way they have treated AFrica...
=09=09=09=09=09=09=09

SECOND PIECE
>=20
>=20
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:52:06 -0500 (EST)
> From: Richard Nyirongo <rn362390@oak.cats.ohiou.edu>
> To: Lisa Aubrey <aubrey@oak.cats.ohiou.edu>
> Subject: Re: WHY AINT THE ECONOMIC BAND PLAYING (fwd)
>=20
> >=20
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 15:21:45 +0100
> From: Thandika Mkandawire <i31776@INET.UNI-C.DK>
> To: NYASANET@MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU
> Subject: Re: WHY AINT THE ECONOMIC BAND PLAYING
>=20
> Your frustration is understandable. Although the economists from Bretton
> Woods Institutions at times sound as if they have the solution, in their
> moments of candour, they are as puzzled as everyone else with the failure=
of
> the nostrums in Africa. Why haven't savings gone up with interest rates, =
why
> is the private sector not investing given the putatitely more favourable
> environment? why has the export sector not picked up following devaluatio=
n?
> The problem lies largely in the wholesale jettisoning of the core content=
of
> "development economics" with its awareness of structural rigidities,
> information asymmetries, market failure, externalities etc. and its
> replacement by a policy-framework based on neo-classical axioms of the
> textbook type. It is interesting to note that most of the Asian countrie=
s
> currently experiencing the financial melt-down were touted as "miracles" =
who
> respected the kind of "fundamentals" we are being told to respect.
> You are right in suggesting that we ought to rely on our own knowledge on
> how our economy is constructed, how key actors respond to particular
> incentives etc.. Our reliance on peripatetic advisors who have left ruins
> all over the world but remain unaccountable to anyone is the cause of a l=
ot
> of our suffering. The blame ultimately falls on us for lack of
> self-confidence and and for our naivet=E9 and belief that people who have
> spent a day in Malawi are somehow "experts" .
>=20
> Thandika
>=20
> *********************
> * TO LEAVE NYASANET *
> *********************
> write to LISTSERV@MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU and, in the body of your message
> (not the subject line), write: SIGNOFF NYASANET
>=20
>=20
>=20


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 21:35:25 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S. Jaiteh)
Subject: Eid day???
Message-ID: <199801290235.VAA19949@hemlock.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Can someone tell us when Eid day is? Can Drammeh Kunda in the Middle East tell
us the situation in their part of the world? I hope ya all had
nice Ramadan.

Jaiteh Kunda Nkoo

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 20:25:43 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: "Gambia-l" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Fw: M$ Monitor: Contact DOJ
Message-ID: <199801290237.UAA07725@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



----------
> From: Audrie Krause <audrie@netaction.org>
> To:
> Subject: M$ Monitor: Contact DOJ
> Date: Wednesday, January 28, 1998 2:17 AM
>
> The Micro$oft Monitor
>
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

> Published by NetAction Issue No. 22 January 28,
1998
> Repost where appropriate. Copyright and subscription info at end of
message.
> * * * * * * *
> In This Issue:
> One Small Victory Over Microsoft
> Campus Technology Takeover Still On Hold
> About the Micro$oft Monitor
>
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

>
> One Small Victory Over Microsoft
> A report by Nathan Newman, NetAction Project Director
>
> Advocates for open technology standards won a minor victory this past
> week with Microsoft's agreement to honor the initial court order
> pursued by the Department of Justice. That initial court order
> prohibits Microsoft from forcing computer makers to give Internet
> Explorer automatic placement on every Windows desktop as a condition
> for purchasing Windows itself.
>
> Combined with Netscape's announcement that it will be giving Navigator
> away free just like Explorer, there is now a glimmer of hope that
> Microsoft's Internet juggernaut will be successfully challenged.
>
> WHAT YOU CAN DO:
> E-mail the Department of Justice to Expand the Investigation
>
> ** Thank DOJ for its pursuit of Microsoft's monopoly abuses
> ** Urge DOJ to expand the scope of its investigation
>
> Send E-mail to: <antitrust@usdoj.gov> or link directly to a mail form:
> <Mailto:antitrust@usdoj.gov>.
>
> For more information, contact Nathan Newman, at: <nathan@netaction.org>,
or
> link directly to a mail form: <Mailto:nathan@netaction.org>.
>
> Keep in mind that this victory should be acknowledged for the rather
minor
> step forward that it is, since the agreement addresses the rather
gratuitous
> coercive tactics used by Microsoft. The Department of Justice has
> not yet fully addressed the monopolistic advantages Microsoft has that
> makes coercive agreements a sideshow to the real economic power it has
> within computing.
>
> The fact that Microsoft has chosen to give Explorer away has always
> marked the fact that this is not a traditional battle for "market
> share" between competing products, but rather a battle for
> technological and economic control of far more than just browser
> software.
>
> NetAction has maintained that Microsoft should be barred from giving
> away its software as a prima facie act of monopolistic dumping.
>
> On one hand, if Microsoft is serious that it's only concern is with
> "integrating" Explorer into Windows 98, its history of free browser
> software giveaways up to this point must be treated as predatory pricing
> aimed at enhancing the value of its existing operating system
> monopoly. The very fact that Microsoft is integrating Explorer into
> Windows should be a basis not only for exploring monopolistic
> practices in the marketing of browser software, but in the sales and
> building of Microsoft's core operating system itself. By integrating
> various kinds of software into its operating system, Microsoft has
> liquidated whole areas of software competition while increasing the
> Windows "tax" it collects on nearly every personal computer sold. The
> absorption of Explorer into Windows would make its giveaway of "free"
> Explorer software expensive for consumers over the long term if
> history is a guide.
>
> The Department of Justice is emphasizing the monopoly aspects of
> Microsoft's marketing of Internet Explorer, but the proposed
> integration with Windows 98 should be cause to reopen the broader
> issue of Microsoft's monopoly of the whole desktop operating
> environment. NetAction has called on the DOJ to push for Microsoft to
> spin off its operating system as a separate company from its
> applications and Internet divisions.
>
> At its heart, however, the controversy over browser software is about
> the most fundamental power issues of the information age -- who will
> control the technical standards that underlie the Internet and who will
> control Internet commerce for the new century.
>
> Microsoft's approach to giving browsers away is about controlling
> Internet standards embedded in the browser not in order to win shares
> in that "product" market but to sell to a whole slew of other market
> areas through the raw exercise of the control of technical standards,
> rather than through competition in those areas.
>
> Dumping browsers on the market for free is not about gaining "market
> share" in any traditional sense, but about controlling those standards
> and the billions of dollars that will flow to the company that
> controls them. If the dominant Internet browser is designed not to
> "read" a certain kind of information -- a kind of graphics, software
> effect, etc. -- then web page designers will be loathe to use that kind
> of information or technology, while they will have to support software
> standards that are compatible with the dominant browser. And if you
> are a software company like Microsoft selling web servers and web design
> software, and are also involved in an array of Internet commerce, you
have an
> overriding interest in controlling those Web standards.
>
> The Department of Justice has to move beyond its particularistic
> focus on browser software to vigorously support the principle of open
> technical standards controlled by no single company. Without the
> possibility of developing proprietary standards, Microsoft will have
> to compete based on innovation rather than raw economic power.
>
> NetAction urges you to email the Department of Justice and ask them to
> support the following principles:
>
> 1. Divestiture: At a minimum, Microsoft's Windows operating system
> monopoly should be split off into a separate company from the
> application and Internet divisions. This would end the inherent
> opportunities for abuse of one company competing in application
> markets while controlling the "field" of competition as well. It may
> also prove necessary to separate Microsoft's application and Internet
> divisions.
>
> 2. Restrain Predation: Stop Microsoft from giving away browser
> products. Since $0.00 is below any measure of cost, it meets the
> traditional test for predatory pricing (sustaining below cost pricing
> with monopoly profits in order to drive out competition and then raise
> price).
>
> 3. Licensing: Microsoft should be forced to discontinue any
> licensing practices (NT, database server, etc.) that restrict customer
> dealings with competitors or require customer use of Microsoft products.
> Exclusive dealing and tying the purchase of one product to purchase of
> another should be unlawful for this monopolist where linked to the
> operating system.
>
> 4. Open Standards: The government should more vigorously support open
> standards processes and endeavor to defend open standards developed
> through industry standards processes from anticompetitive abuse by
> Microsoft.
>
> 5. Consumer Involvement: The government must establish processes to
> ensure participation by Internet users in public policy decisions
> effecting consumer use of the Internet, including appropriate
> mechanisms for addressing complaints about product marketing and the
> quality and reliability of Internet services.
>
>
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

>
> Campus Technology Takeover Still On Hold
>
> NetAction has other progress to report in the fight for open computing
> standards. Working with faculty, students and staff throughout the
> state of California, NetAction has helped to rally opposition to
> a technology deal that would give a for-profit corporation owned by
> Microsoft, GTE, Hughes and Fujitsu monopoly control of technology at
> the 360,000 student California State University (CSU) system.
>
> After NetAction Program Director Nathan Newman and other CETI
> opponents testified at a January 6 hearing of the state Legislature,
> support for the CETI initiative was obviously shaken among legislators.
> In a public letter to the CSU administration, California Assembly
Members
> Jim Cuneen and Debra Bowen called on CSU officials to radically revise
their
> technology plans for the university. As the San Francisco Chronicle
> reported on January 22, the legislators wrote, "As proposed, CETI may
lock
> the state into technological solutions that are likely to become obsolete

> before the term of the agreement runs out. We want to encourage CSU to
move
> away from a process that effectively awards exclusive rights to any
> company.''
>
> Similarly, California Senate Majority Whip Leroy Greene wrote a letter to
> CSU campus newspaper editors raising serious concerns about the CETI
> proposal. He specifically cited testimony by NetAction's Nathan Newman
> that, "Given the size and importance of the California State
> University system, CETI's monopoly nature will give Microsoft a
> massive strategic advantage in its ongoing effort to monopolize global
> software and Internet standards." Senator Greene further noted that
> the Legislative Counsel's analysis had highlighted four ways in which
> CETI violates the state Constitution.
>
> A second round of hearings on CETI is planned for the end of
> February, and NetAction will continue to mobilize public pressure to
> assure that California's universities remain a place of innovation and
open
> standards, not a private training ground for Microsoft technology.
>
>
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

>
> About The Micro$oft Monitor
>
> The Micro$oft Monitor is a free electronic newsletter, published as part
of
> the Consumer Choice Campaign <http://www.netaction.org/msoft/ccc.html>.
> NetAction is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to educating
the
> public, policy makers, and the media about technology-based social and
> political issues, and to teaching activists how to use the Internet for
> organizing, outreach, and advocacy.
>
> To subscribe to The Micro$oft Monitor, write to:
<majordomo@netaction.org>.
> The body of the message should state: <subscribe monitor>. To
unsubscribe
> at any time, send a message to: <majordomo@netaction.org>. The body of
the
> message should state: <unsubscribe monitor>
>
> NetAction is seeking sponsors to provide financial support for the
continued
> publication of the Micro$oft Monitor. Sponsors will be acknowledged in
the
> newsletter and on NetAction's Web site. NetAction is supported by
> individual contributions, membership dues and grants.
>
> For more information about contributing to NetAction, or sponsoring the
> Micro$oft Monitor, contact Audrie Krause by phone: (415) 775-8674, by
> E-mail: <mailto:audrie@netaction.org>, visit the NetAction Web site at:
> <http://www.netaction.org>, or write to:
> NetAction * 601 Van Ness Ave., No. 631 * San Francisco, CA 94102
>
> To learn more about how activists can use the Internet for grassroots
> organizing, outreach, and advocacy, subscribe to NetAction Notes, a free
> electronic newsletter published twice a month.
>
> To subscribe to NetAction Notes, send a message to:
<majordomo@netaction.org>
> The body of the message should state: <subscribe netaction>. To
unsubscribe
> at any time, send a message to: <majordomo@netaction.org>. The body of
the
> message should state: <unsubscribe netaction>.
>
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

>
> Copyright 1998 by NetAction/The Tides Center. All rights reserved.
> Material may be reposted or reproduced for non-commercial use provided
> NetAction is cited as the source. NetAction is a project of The Tides
> Center, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 20:26:07 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: "Gambia-l" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Fw: Africa: Policy Outlook 1998
Message-ID: <199801290237.UAA07743@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



----------
> From: apic@igc.org
> To: apic@igc.org
> Subject: Africa: Policy Outlook 1998
> Date: Wednesday, January 28, 1998 9:23 AM
>
> Africa: Policy Outlook 1998
> Date distributed (ymd): 980128
> APIC Document
>
> +++++++++++++++++++++Document Profile+++++++++++++++++++++
>
> Region: Continent-Wide
> Issue Areas: +political/rights+ +economy/development+
> +security/peace+ +US policy focus+
> Summary Contents:
> This posting contains a summary overview of expected Africa
> policy issues for the year, with a focus on U.S. policy. It
> also contains a request to readers to suggest priority reading
> for President Clinton on his expected trip to Africa.
>
> +++++++++++++++++end profile++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
>
> Africa Policy Outlook 1998
>
> As Africa moves into 1998, observers on the continent as well
> as outside are divided on whether to emphasize new hopes or
> the persistence of old problems. There is evidence to support
> each view. The continent's economic growth is stronger than
> at any time since the early 1970s. But Africa still accounts
> for a small fraction of world trade and investment, and
> macroeconomic growth is accompanied by stagnant or declining
> living conditions for the majority of Africans.
>
> Last year saw the removal of one of the continent's
> longest-surviving dictators, Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire (now
> the Democratic Republic of Congo). But the prospects for the
> new Congo government are uncertain. Conflict continues in
> eastern Congo and in the adjacent Great Lakes countries of
> Rwanda and Burundi, and in many other countries as well. The
> demand for democracy continues to grow, with an increasing
> number of groups engaged in different aspects of that
> struggle. But momentum is hobbled by ambiguous results,
> disillusionment, and quarrels among elites--a pattern that is
> unlikely to change decisively in 1998.
>
> Neither "Afro-pessimism" nor "Afro-optimism" captures what is
> really a very mixed picture. The situation is different from
> country to country, sector to sector, observer to observer.
> Yet there can be no doubt that Africa is taking its own
> initiatives to address the problems of the "second
> independence" era. These range from grassroots efforts at
> survival to regional initiatives for cooperation among both
> governments and institutions of civil society.
>
> Economic Progress and Setbacks
>
> Africa's growth rate in 1996 exceeded 5%. Although the rate
> was expected to drop back to 3.4% for 1997, some estimates
> project up to 4.7% growth for 1998. These results are higher
> than the 2% growth of the early 1990s. However, they are
> still insufficient to reduce the highest average poverty rates
> in the world. Food security in several African regions in
> 1998 is expected to be threatened further by El Nino's effects
> on the weather.
>
> A recent report from the International Labor Organization
> estimates that in Sub-Saharan Africa, the proportion of the
> population living in poverty will increase to over 50% by the
> year 2000. Unemployment in Africa's large cities is more than
> 20% and is expected to approach 30% by the end of the decade.
> Critics of the structural adjustment packages of the last
> decade--and even many analysts within the international
> financial institutions--stress that African countries are
> unlikely to break out of this trap without massive investment
> in education, health and public infrastructure. Doing so will
> require mobilization of domestic resources and private foreign
> investment. It will also require steps to reverse the
> downward trend in international aid and to address the
> continent's crushing debt burden.
>
> The World Bank/International Monetary Fund initiative for
> highly indebted poor countries resulted in approval of
> substantial debt relief packages for Uganda and Burkina Faso
> in 1997, with Mozambique and Cote d'Ivoire in line for 1998.
> But the size and pace of the relief still falls short of what
> is needed. The continent's annual debt service payments are
> predicted to rise from $30 billion in 1996 to $33 billion in
> 1998, a figure equivalent to 24% of total exports. African
> and international NGOs and churches will continue to work for
> greater debt reductions in 1998.
>
> Ongoing Conflicts
>
> Fighting continues in Sudan, Algeria, and the Great Lakes
> region, with little prospect of resolution during the year.
> These wars have caused casualties in large numbers and have
> had crippling economic effects. More limited conflicts
> afflict other countries, including Uganda and Senegal. Peace
> agreements being implemented in Angola, Sierra Leone, and the
> Central African Republic are fragile and incomplete. The
> military victory of Sassou-Nguesso in the civil war in Congo
> (Brazzaville) last year brought a new government to power.
> Sassou-Nguesso has promised a transition to civilian rule, but
> so far the stability of his government is based on military
> victory, not legitimacy.
>
> In Burundi, neither sanctions by regional states nor attempts
> at mediation have diminished the conflict between the
> Tutsi-dominated military regime and Hutu rebel forces.
> Regional observers also see increasing signs of coordination
> among extremist Hutu forces and their allies in attacks in
> Burundi, Rwanda and eastern Congo. These forces were
> responsible for the genocide against Tutsis and moderate Hutus
> in Rwanda in 1994 and they still openly advocate the
> extermination of the remaining Tutsis. Their resurgence has
> also led to increasing abuses against civilians in the
> counterinsurgency campaigns by Rwanda and Congo (Kinshasa).
>
> In Sudan, opponents of the fundamentalist military regime have
> seen their military prospects improve. But there is little
> hope of peace any time soon. In Algeria the death toll from
> massacres continues to mount. Extremist guerrillas, who
> previously targeted mainly government supporters, educated
> women and intellectuals, are increasingly going after
> ordinary villagers as well. The military regime's primary
> response is repression, which is often indiscriminate and
> which has been unsuccessful in curbing the violence. The
> international community is growing more concerned but the
> response in 1998 is likely be limited to calls for
> investigations.
>
> Among campaigners for democracy on the continent, Nigeria will
> remain the major focus this year. The military regime of
> General Sani Abacha has promised to return the country to
> civilian rule by October, but has stepped up repressive
> measures against its opponents. Almost no one except the
> regime's own supporters gives credence to Abacha's promise,
> but there is debate about what measures can be taken to put
> pressure on the regime.
>
> In various other African countries, there is a persistent gap
> between governments' public commitment to democracy and a
> reality which falls far short of that ideal. To cite only a
> few examples, ruling governments in Kenya, Zambia and Ethiopia
> can all claim mandates from recent elections, in 1997, 1996
> and 1995 respectively, as can Cote d'Ivoire from 1995/96. But
> in each case critics cite major flaws in the electoral process
> and repression of the opposition.
>
> In "no-party" Uganda and one-party Eritrea, critics deplore
> the absence of competitive national elections. But supporters
> of those governments point to development initiatives under
> way and to opportunities for popular participation and debate
> on public issues that exceed those in many countries that have
> held elections.
>
> There is particular uncertainty about the extent to which
> criticism should be leveled against the new governments of
> Rwanda and Congo (Kinshasa). Some see Kagame in Rwanda and
> Kabila in Congo (Kinshasa) as part of a self-reliant new
> generation of African leaders who can move their countries
> forward, despite their emphasis on stability rather than
> democratic rights. Some contend that under the circumstances,
> democracy is a luxury that must be put off for later. At the
> other extreme, some critics say these new leaders are just as
> bad as their predecessors (the genocidal former Rwandan
> government and the Mobutu dictatorship). The South African
> government, among others, has emphasized the potential for
> cooperation with the new governments, and the fact that they
> do face real security threats. But many observers stress the
> danger of ignoring human rights abuses and delays in
> democratization. It will continue to be difficult for
> nongovernmental organizations as well as governments to shape
> policies that promote constructive engagement and
> reconstruction without providing support for authoritarian
> government actions.
>
> U.S. Policy Questions
>
> Attention to African issues by U.S. officials, never great,
> may be on a modest upswing. First Lady Hillary Clinton
> visited Africa in March 1997, and Secretary of State Madeleine
> Albright went in December; both President Clinton and
> Vice-President Gore are expected to make Africa trips this
> year. Secretary Albright has named the Africa Growth and
> Opportunity Act as one of the Administration's top four
> foreign policy issues in 1998. In the larger picture, though,
> Africa is still very low on the agenda in U.S. foreign policy
> circles. In its Winter 1997 issue, for example, the
> influential Foreign Policy journal graded the President with
> three analysts from Europe, two from Asia, and one each from
> Latin America, the Middle East and Russia but none from
> Africa. And Africa rated less than a sentence in the
> President's State of the Union address on January 27.
>
> Among the key unanswered questions about U.S. Africa policy in
> 1998:
>
> * Will the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act, and similar
> initiatives to promote U.S. trade and investment, be balanced
> by attention to African development priorities that include
> equity and sustainability?
>
> * Will verbal support for African self-reliance and
> reconstruction be matched by a willingness to invest increased
> U.S. resources through multilateral institutions, African
> governments and civil society, as well as the private sector?
>
> * What will the U.S. government do to support the struggle
> for democracy in Nigeria and around the continent, while
> avoiding the "one-size-fits-all" approach on the one hand and
> opportunistic excuses for human rights violations on the
> other?
>
> ************************************************************
>
> Suggest a Book about Africa for President Clinton
> (and other US officials)
>
> Suppose you were asked to suggest a book for President
> Clinton's airplane reading on his announced trip to South
> Africa and several other African countries in March (see
> http://www.africanews.org/usafrica for the most recent news on
> the trip). What would you suggest? Let us know at
> books@africapolicy.org, and we'll put your suggestion, along
> with your one- or two-sentence comment on the book, on our web
> site (http://www.africapolicy.org).
>
> We'll also pass the accumulated suggestions on to the White
> House before the trip. Of course, we can't guarantee the
> President will take the suggestion! But we think your
> considered recommendations will also be useful for other
> officials and for visitors to our web site, where it will be
> possible to order those among the suggested books that are in
> stock at the on-line bookstore amazon.com.
>
> Please suggest books in print that are available to the US
> public -- or if you do suggest an out-of-print classic or
> another hard-to-find book, please give details on how someone
> can get a copy. Only one suggestion per person, please.
>
> APIC's Senior Research Fellow William Minter starts out by
> suggesting a new book out just this month:
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------
>
> Karl Maier, Into the House of the Ancestors: Inside the New
> Africa (New York: John Wiley & Sons, January 1998). 278 pages.
> ISBN: 047113547X (if you order from amazon.com through the
> ISBN link in this document on our web site --
> http://www.africapolicy.org/docs98/afpo98.htm -- you get a 30%
> discount and APIC gets a 15% referral fee from Amazon).
>
> Exceptional among books by Western journalists, this readable
> report finds inspiration in and presents the voices of
> ordinary Africans who are drawing on their heritage and
> building the future around the continent. Without avoiding
> the horrors and problems--from genocide in Rwanda to child
> soldiers to AIDS--Maier stresses the initiative and
> determination of rarely acknowledged individuals finding the
> way ahead one step at a time.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
>
> How to do it:
>
> To make processing your suggestion easier, just put this form
> in an e-mail to books@africapolicy.org (clip and paste the form
> into a new message) and fill in the blanks. Your answers can
> be more than one line, but please keep within the brackets and
> don't delete them.
>
> 1. <title of book>
> [ ]
>
> 2. <author(s) of book>
> [ ]
>
> 3. <place of publication>
> [ ]
>
> 4. <publisher>
> [ ]
>
> 4. <year of publication>
> [ ]
>
> 6. <mailing address and other contact information for
> publisher>
> [ ]
>
> 7. <URL of publishers' web site, if available>
> [ ]
>
> 8. <your one- or two-sentence comment on the book>
> [ ]
>
> 9. <your name>
> [ ]
>
> 10. <your title and institutional affiliation, or other
> identification>
> [ ]
>
> 11. <your city and country of residence>
>
> [ ]
>
> ************************************************************
> This material is produced and distributed by the
> Africa Policy Information Center (APIC), the educational
> affiliate of the Washington Office on Africa. APIC's primary
> objective is to widen the policy debate in the United States
> around African issues and the U.S. role in Africa, by
> providing accessible policy-relevant information and analysis
> usable by a wide range of groups and individuals.
>
> Auto-response addresses for more information (send any e-mail
> message): africapolicy-info@igc.apc.org (about the Africa
> Policy Electronic Distribution List); apic-info@igc.apc.org
> (about APIC); woa-info@igc.apc.org (about WOA). Documents
> previously distributed, as well as the auto-response
> information files, are also available on the Web at:
> http://www.africapolicy.org.
>
> To be added to or dropped from the distribution list write to
> apic@igc.apc.org.
>
> For additional information: Africa Policy Information Center,
> 110 Maryland Ave. NE, #509, Washington, DC 20002. Phone:
> 202-546-7961. Fax: 202-546-1545. E-mail: apic@igc.apc.org.
> ************************************************************

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 21:42:11 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Cc: NSGA@commit.gm
Subject: The University Extension Programme (UEP)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.980128204207.16240A-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Hi Folks,

First of all, I apologise for the long silence. I traveled out of the
country, came back, and traveled again, this time to Gambia and Senegal, and stayed away for a month or so. And
in my absence, my mail box got full and, since I was not around, I could
not respond to the warning signals in time. So, my e-mail account got
closed for a couple of weeks, and I fell off the Bantaba. But, as you see,
I am back, and very happy to be on the Bantaba again.

While in Gambia, I went to see the authorities at the University Extension
Programme. Two of the issues we discussed were the following:

i) The idea of a book collection & donation campaign for the University,
College and National Libraries, that was discussed on this Bantaba a few
months ago. The person I spoke to acknowledged the importance of books to
all universities. Infact, he said documentation is probably one of
the most important problems that they are confronted with. Teachers
are obliged to provide their own course/reading material for the
students. Those coming from Saint Mary's University xerox
important journal articles, etc and take them along to The Gambia when
going to teach courses. However, he said they are also confronted with a
space problem. They have no place called a library exclusively belonging
to the UEP. What they have is some space at the Library of the MDI where
to keep books on reserve for the UEP students. While this is very helpful
to he UEP, it is not quite enough for a University library. An additional
difficulty in handling donated books would be the handling and other
logistical issues that may arise, at a time when they are still a small
team, with a staff of just a few people. The UEP, as we all know, is a
provisional arrangement, an experiment that is extremely promising, but it
is still a provisional arrangement. Some of the tasks that need to be
carried out will be carried out by the University of Gambia, when the UEP
is phased into it.

ii) The second issue is, precisely, staffing, particularly teaching
staff. The UEP is interested in getting more Gambian teachers/lecturers. Right now
they have three Gambians among the faculty. A fourth one has been (or is
about to be recruited). All faculty are faculty of the University of
Saint-Mary's, Halifax. Gambian teachers are also normally recruited as
Adjunct Professors of Saint-Mary's. Normally, courses are taught one at a
time. Therefore, Gambian teachers need not be unemployed to teach there:
they can arrange to be on leave for one month or so and use that time to
teach at the UEP. Those who are interested in a teaching position at the
UEP can therefore send their CVs to the following address:

University Extension Programme
P.O. Box 133
Banjul.
Phone: 220-37 42 54
Fax: 220-37 42 56
E-mail: NSGA@commit.gm


On the issue of giving books, I have also discussed with the Director of
Publications of CODESRIA, in Dakar. As part of its policy of supporting
African Universities, CODESRIA is willing to give some of the books it has
published, as well as past issues of its journals. All that the UEP needs
to do is to send some one to go to Dakar to collect them. CODESRIA is also
willing to henceforth send one copy of every issue of each one of its
journals (Africa Development, Afrika Zamani (a journal of history), the African
Sociological Review, The African Journal of International Relations, and
CODESRIA Bulletin) to the UEP library, and copies of all new books and
working papers, as it does with other universities.
I have informed the UEP official I met.

I think we should continue the conversation with the UEP officials, and
with the authorities of the other institutions to see how/if we can help.
This, I guess, is something the Education Committee can coordinate.

I am also copying this message to the UEP, for information, with the hope
that if there are inaccuracies in what I have written,they will correct
them. They may also want to clarify certain issues or add a few more to
those raised above.

With all best wishes !

Ebrima Sall
CODESRIA & Yale.


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 21:12:56 EST
From: SANG1220 <SANG1220@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Scandal
Message-ID: <1ce6a188.34cfe5aa@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Bobby, I don't think people are refraining from discussing the scandal in D.C
rather I suspect everybody is busy getting ready for ramadan or waiting to see
how this thing unfolds. A word to the wise, for the pres. to be impeached, it
requires that he be found guilty of using the office of the presidency
illegally. The mere allegation of a sexual act does not constitude an
impaechable offense, rather if he's found to have suborne perjury he could be
in trouble. Even here, problem arises because it becomes a he say, she say
senario. Perhaps we should wait and see where the chips fall before delving
into it with vigor.
Thanks
Daddy Sang

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 21:57:30 -0500 (EST)
From: Ebrima Sall <ebrima.sall@yale.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Eid day???
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.94.980128215120.16240B-100000@minerva.cis.yale.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

About four hours ago, I spoke to a relative in Senegal, who happens to be
an Imam, and he told me that a Declaration has been issued, saying that Eid day is
Friday.

Ebrima.

On Wed, 28 Jan 1998, Malanding S. Jaiteh wrote:

> Can someone tell us when Eid day is? Can Drammeh Kunda in the Middle East tell
> us the situation in their part of the world? I hope ya all had
> nice Ramadan.
>
> Jaiteh Kunda Nkoo
>

Ebrima Sall
iiimmmll

mmmEEeNPPynnnppppppppppss
mmmmmnp


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 22:12:19 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <34CFF393.7D27@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

SANG1220 wrote:
>
> A word to the wise, for the pres. to be impeached, it
> requires that he be found guilty of using the office of the presidency
> illegally.


To be impeached is not the same thing as removal from office. The term
simply means charging the president with wrongdoing. No US president has
ever been removed from office as a result of the process. Only Andrew
Johnson (from Tennessee) was impeached by the House but he remained in
office since his detractors were one vote short of the necessary
two-thirds of the Senate required to convict him.

KEY STAGES IN THE PROCESS
Step One: House Judiciary Committee conducts investigations and/or
hearings and makes a recommendation to the full House of
Representatives.
(Nixon balked after the HJC recommended impeachment.)

Step Two: If impeachment is recommended, the full House votes on the
matter. A majority is required to IMPEACH the President.

Step Three: The Senate tries the president, with the Chief Justice
presiding. Two-thirds of the body must vote for conviction for the
president to be removed.

In this intensely partisan climate and system, who expects Clinton to be
impeached, convicted, and removed from office? NOT ME!!

Amadou

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:38:38 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Eid day???
Message-ID: <01bd2c78$26207180$LocalHost@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr.Jaiteh,
I am terribly sorry about the late response.I was too busy
with this Koriteh related affairs that I didn't have time to check my
mails.But I am sure you now know that the koriteh in the middle East is
today, Thursday whilst, as Mr.Sall has said,gambia and Senegal would have
theirs on Friday.So,now that the Ramadan is over, those who have been
stealing water (I am not going to name names here;pretty obvious,isnt it?)
have now been shamed.

So,a very enjoyable Koriteh to everyone,and that includes those who have
been pressurising their doctors to tell them that they are not fit to keep
fast! What a shame! It was just thirty days.


Regards Basssss!
-----Original Message-----
From: Malanding S. Jaiteh <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Thursday, January 29, 1998 11:30 AM
Subject: Eid day???


>Can someone tell us when Eid day is? Can Drammeh Kunda in the Middle East
tell
>us the situation in their part of the world? I hope ya all had
>nice Ramadan.
>
>Jaiteh Kunda Nkoo
>


------------------------------
Go to Top of Page

Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

Posted - 10 Sep 2021 :  16:47:16  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 22:28:05 PST
From: "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
Message-ID: <19980129062806.17048.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Greetings:
Though days, months and years keep flying by,
our bantaba continues to keep us all on on top of issues.
At times it is the political situation in our motherland.
Will the AFPRC step down? Will there be elections?
The NCC has drafted a new constitution.
What does it say? Who will challenge Jammeh?
At times it is the economy.
Is investing heavily in infrastrutural development the answer?
All these new school buildings, but where are the teachers?
Sometimes it is culture or its absence thereof;
Other times it is education,
The University Extension Program,
Book Donation Campaign,
Announcement: A new Committee for Education is being formed.
Curriculum evaluation ...
Another voice jumps in to remind us;
'70% of the workforce are farmers',
So we ought to focus on Agriculture.
We ought to invest more in this sector!
Another voice dissents from the agriculturist.
'No! Agriculture failed to transform our
Nation into a modern economy.'
The answer lies in Information Technology.
Perhaps, says another. But where are our techies?
Announcement: A new company in Banjul is providing
e-mail access to gambians. Welcome gambia-l shadow list!
Postings from news sources are forwarded to the bantaba.
The news agencies rep. on the bantaba objects to it.
The bantaba ponders then acts. 'Keep the info. in the bush.'
Announcement: The Bush List is now operational. News postings
related to Gambia and Africa can be obtained there.
Sometimes the mood of the bantaba is playful.
A monkey joke is delivereed with such potency,
The entire bantaba doubles over with laughter.
Oh, by the way. Another new member has been added.
Welcome to our bantaba, we look forward to your intro.
Announcement: Jobs and Fellowships FWD.
Religion is raised and quickly buried. Too sensitive.
The Duutoo boys poke fun at Gunjurians.
The international community is assesed.
Someone pinch me. Is this not our Second Anniversary???

LatJor

LatJor

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:21:55 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New members
Message-ID: <19980129072308.AAA61888@nijii>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Greetings,
Alasana Jammeh and Sebja S. Adams have been added to the list.
Welcome to this Gambian bantaba (pencha bi) in cyberspace. Please
send a brief introduction to gambia-l@u.washington.edu.


Happy Eid ul-Fitr (koriteh) to everyone on the Gambia-l!!

Momodou Camara


*******************************************************
http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara

**"Start by doing what's necessary, then what's
possible and suddenly you are doing the impossible"***

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 03:52:02 -0600
From: Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Eid day???
Message-ID: <1.5.4.16.19980129032711.1097e376@etbu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

At 08:38 AM 1/29/98 +0300, Bass wrote:

>So,a very enjoyable Koriteh to everyone,and that includes those who have
>been pressurising their doctors to tell them that they are not fit to keep
>fast! What a shame! It was just thirty days.
>

Pa Musa, maybe you can respond to the above statement. I remember during
Ramadan you used to tell us in class that your doctor had diagnosed you with
ULCER, so you couldn't keep fast. I have always wondered over the years the
scientific reasoning behind that argument. I hope you are feeling ok now.
(hope you see the sarcasm??). Best of luck in The Gambia.
It's Tamsir.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 10:03:25 +0100
From: Amadou Kabir Njie <Amadou.Kabir.Njie@Aviaplan.no>
To: "'Gambia-L@u.Washington.edu'" <Gambia-L@u.Washington.edu>
Subject: Test!!!
Message-ID: <FBF1001D6A18D1118AC100A0C942F230A676@AVIA-A>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain


I have not received any mails from since yesterday.
So I'm jsut testing to make sure there is nothing wrong

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 03:47:44 PST
From: "Momodou Camara" <nijii@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
Message-ID: <19980129114746.6317.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Latjor wrote:
>
>Greetings:
>Though days, months and years keep flying by,
>our bantaba continues to keep us all on on top of issues.
>At times it is the political situation in our motherland.
>Will the AFPRC step down? Will there be elections?
>The NCC has drafted a new constitution.
>What does it say? Who will challenge Jammeh?
>At times it is the economy.
>Is investing heavily in infrastrutural development the answer?
>All these new school buildings, but where are the teachers?
>Sometimes it is culture or its absence thereof;
>Other times it is education,
>The University Extension Program,
>Book Donation Campaign,
>Announcement: A new Committee for Education is being formed.
>Curriculum evaluation ...
>Another voice jumps in to remind us;
>'70% of the workforce are farmers',
>So we ought to focus on Agriculture.
>We ought to invest more in this sector!
>Another voice dissents from the agriculturist.
>'No! Agriculture failed to transform our
>Nation into a modern economy.'
>The answer lies in Information Technology.
>Perhaps, says another. But where are our techies?
>Announcement: A new company in Banjul is providing
>e-mail access to gambians. Welcome gambia-l shadow list!
>Postings from news sources are forwarded to the bantaba.
>The news agencies rep. on the bantaba objects to it.
>The bantaba ponders then acts. 'Keep the info. in the bush.'
>Announcement: The Bush List is now operational. News postings
>related to Gambia and Africa can be obtained there.
>Sometimes the mood of the bantaba is playful.
>A monkey joke is delivereed with such potency,
>The entire bantaba doubles over with laughter.
>Oh, by the way. Another new member has been added.
>Welcome to our bantaba, we look forward to your intro.
>Announcement: Jobs and Fellowships FWD.
>Religion is raised and quickly buried. Too sensitive.
>The Duutoo boys poke fun at Gunjurians.
>The international community is assesed.
>Someone pinch me. Is this not our Second Anniversary???
>
>LatJor
>

Thanks for the reminder Latjor and a brief summary of the events on the
Gambia-l during the past two years.

Happy anniversary in advance to everyone.

Momodou Camara

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 14:53:22 GMT
From: SADAMS <SADAMS@geog.gla.ac.uk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: New members
Message-ID: <13C96AB2D58@geog.gla.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Thanks for signing us up.
Happy 'Koriteh'
Sebja ADAMS

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 15:52:21 GMT
From: SADAMS <SADAMS@geog.gla.ac.uk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: (Fwd) Re: New members
Message-ID: <13D925F53C9@geog.gla.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

------- Forwarded Message Follows -------
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 14:53:22 GMT
Reply-to: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
From: SADAMS <SADAMS@geog.gla.ac.uk>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: New members

Thanks for signing us up.
Happy 'Koriteh'
Sebja ADAMS

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 11:39:00 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: EID MUBARAK!!!!
Message-ID: <9801291639.AA18356@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Gambia-Lers ALL over the world,

I hope that Ramadhan was as exciting for you as it was for me. I wish each
one of you and your families a blessed EID MUBARAK, and hope that we get
tons of blessings for our fasting. And may some of those blessings be
passed on to our country in particular and the world in general.

It's lunch time now, got to run :-) C'ya later!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

=========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------



------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 11:44:12 EST
From: BobbySil <BobbySil@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Festive Koriteh Weekend Party
Message-ID: <1621c55c.34d0b1de@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

The Atlanta Gambian Community Organization cordially invites you to their
Koriteh Party to be held at Chastain-Woods Apartement Clubhouse. Tickets are
$10 per person, to be held on Saturday, January 31 from 10pm onwards. Proceeds
will go to the funding of the upcoming fourth of July/Gambian re-union
celebration. For those of you in the metro-Atlanta area please inform others.

For additional information, please contact 404-320-0283 or 770-952-7517, and
ask for Ablie Njie or Kunta Sissoho respectively.

Thanks, Happy Eid
Baboucarr Sillah

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 11:55:11 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Fwd:president's ramadhan message (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9801291119.A8020-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

It's probably alittle too late for this........but I thought this was
really nice. Hope everyone had a really nice Korite!!! By the way, can
someone please give me some info on ALD?? ie the date etc. Are there any
more concrete plans about the conference and what is the topic to be
discussed??? (I might have missed that) etc. Thanks!!!
Ancha.

President's Ramadhan Message

>>December 30, 1997
>>>
>>>
>>> Warm greetings to everyone observing the holy month of Ramadan.
>>>
>>> For millions of Muslims across our nation and around the world,
>>>Ramadan marks the time when God revealed the Holy Quran to the Prophet
>>>Muhammad. During this sacred month, the ninth in the Islamic lunar
>>>calendar, devout Muslims concentrate on their faith, study the Quran,
>>>and discipline themselves through fasting between dawn and dusk. They
>>>seek to answer Islam's call to a life of piety, justice, and peace and
>>>to draw closer to God and to one another through many hours spent in
>>>prayer and contemplation.
>>>
>>> Ramadan is a powerful reminder to all of us that the true riches of
>>>life are found, not in material goods, but rather in the gifts of the
>>>spirit: the ever-present guidance and bountiful mercy of God, the love
>>>of family and friends, and the freedom to worship according to one's
>>>own conscience and convictions.
>>>
>>> As the crescent moon once again heralds the coming of this season
>>>of faith and spiritual renewal, Hillary and I extend best wishes for a
>>>memorable observance.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> WILLIAM J. CLINTON




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 12:50:08 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu
Subject: Re: Eid day???
Message-ID: <199801291750.MAA16294@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>

Bassss wrote:

> Mr.Jaiteh,
> I am terribly sorry about the late response.I was too busy
> with this Koriteh related affairs that I didn't have time to check my
> mails.But I am sure you now know that the koriteh in the middle East is
> today, Thursday whilst, as Mr.Sall has said,gambia and Senegal would have
> theirs on Friday.So,now that the Ramadan is over, those who have been
> stealing water (I am not going to name names here;pretty obvious,isnt it?)
> have now been shamed.
>
> So,a very enjoyable Koriteh to everyone,and that includes those who have
> been pressurising their doctors to tell them that they are not fit to keep
> fast! What a shame! It was just thirty days.
>
>
> Regards Basssss!


Eid Mubarak Bassss. Some members of our community have been in touch with families in the middle East and they also confirmed Thursday's EID. Whatever the day, I would like to bid all a great Koriteh( Sungkarr Salo)!
I just hope that the Drammehs, Fofanas, Jallows, Sidibehs and Sankarehs had all mananged to keep the up with the promise.

Malanding Jaiteh


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 13:12:04 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Eid day???
Message-ID: <f849d0e7.34d0c678@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Anyway in The Gambia Eid is Friday. Some villages did pray to day though. You
know the normal argument as to who saw the Moon. Most peole in the North Bank
have prayed because the Moon was seen at Medina Baye Mass, but the Greater
Banjul Area did not pray because they claim to have not seen the Moon.

The Supreme Islamic Council were on television last night to announce that
since no one had claim to see the Moon, Eid will be on Friday. It was after
this announcement, around 10:30PM, that the people of Medina Baye Mass callled
SUD FM to annouce the sighting of the Moon. So you can imagine the confusion,
some have stopped fasting but did pray and others continue their fast and
every body will pray tomorrow.

Something has to be done to rectify this situation.

PEACE
Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 13:36:20 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: msjaiteh@mtu.edu
Subject: Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
Message-ID: <199801291836.NAA16298@aspen.ffr.mtu.edu>


> From GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu Thu Jan 29 06:50:36 1998
> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 03:47:44 PST
> From: "Momodou Camara" <nijii@hotmail.com>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
> X-Originating-IP: [194.19.183.221]
> X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 beta -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
>
> Latjor wrote:
> >
> >Greetings:
> >Though days, months and years keep flying by,
> >our bantaba continues to keep us all on on top of issues.
> >At times it is the political situation in our motherland.
> >Will the AFPRC step down? Will there be elections?
> >The NCC has drafted a new constitution.
> >What does it say? Who will challenge Jammeh?
> >At times it is the economy.
> >Is investing heavily in infrastrutural development the answer?
> >All these new school buildings, but where are the teachers?
> >Sometimes it is culture or its absence thereof;
> >Other times it is education,
> >The University Extension Program,
> >Book Donation Campaign,
> >Announcement: A new Committee for Education is being formed.
> >Curriculum evaluation ...
> >Another voice jumps in to remind us;
> >'70% of the workforce are farmers',
> >So we ought to focus on Agriculture.
> >We ought to invest more in this sector!
> >Another voice dissents from the agriculturist.
> >'No! Agriculture failed to transform our
> >Nation into a modern economy.'
> >The answer lies in Information Technology.
> >Perhaps, says another. But where are our techies?
> >Announcement: A new company in Banjul is providing
> >e-mail access to gambians. Welcome gambia-l shadow list!
> >Postings from news sources are forwarded to the bantaba.
> >The news agencies rep. on the bantaba objects to it.
> >The bantaba ponders then acts. 'Keep the info. in the bush.'
> >Announcement: The Bush List is now operational. News postings
> >related to Gambia and Africa can be obtained there.
> >Sometimes the mood of the bantaba is playful.
> >A monkey joke is delivereed with such potency,
> >The entire bantaba doubles over with laughter.
> >Oh, by the way. Another new member has been added.
> >Welcome to our bantaba, we look forward to your intro.
> >Announcement: Jobs and Fellowships FWD.
> >Religion is raised and quickly buried. Too sensitive.
> >The Duutoo boys poke fun at Gunjurians.
> >The international community is assesed.
> >Someone pinch me. Is this not our Second Anniversary???
> >
> >LatJor
> >
>
> Thanks for the reminder Latjor and a brief summary of the events on the
> Gambia-l during the past two years.
>
> Happy anniversary in advance to everyone.
>
> Momodou Camara
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
Latjor,
Thanks for that reminder. I would like thank all of you managers who give your time to keep the list going. I think we all need to be proud of ourselves for ensuring that "horoma ning Buu-nyaa"(Yarru ak Teranga) had been the code of conduct over the past two-three years. These are no doubt the basic building blocks of democracy. Certainly, Gambia-lers do not need this kind of lectures but I would want all members to do one thing. Reflect on some of the 10 most valuable things we learned from becoming members of this great Bantaba(Penchabi).

I can not conclude without mentioning by name, a visionary, compatriot, colleage a friend and really someone I have come to admire. The man who made all this possible. I know he will not agree with me(but thats only in his nature). He is the founder of this list, the man in "Dekat" our great Fana fana, Dr Katim S. Touray. Oops, he prefers to be called katim so don't mind if you skip Dr.

I will call on all to flood his mail box atleast for this occasion and send him a note as an acknowledgement of his efforts towards a Gambian Cyber-Bantaba.



his address: dekat@itis.com

Malanding Jaiteh

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 00:53:34 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
Message-ID: <01bd2d00$58cfb860$LocalHost@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

That was really sweet,Lat! Keep up th good work down there!


Regards Bassss!


>Greetings:
>Though days, months and years keep flying by,
>our bantaba continues to keep us all on on top of issues.
>At times it is the political situation in our motherland.
>Will the AFPRC step down? Will there be elections?
>The NCC has drafted a new constitution.
>What does it say? Who will challenge Jammeh?
>At times it is the economy.
>Is investing heavily in infrastrutural development the answer?
>All these new school buildings, but where are the teachers?
>Sometimes it is culture or its absence thereof;
>Other times it is education,
>The University Extension Program,
>Book Donation Campaign,
>Announcement: A new Committee for Education is being formed.
>Curriculum evaluation ...
>Another voice jumps in to remind us;
>'70% of the workforce are farmers',
>So we ought to focus on Agriculture.
>We ought to invest more in this sector!
>Another voice dissents from the agriculturist.
>'No! Agriculture failed to transform our
>Nation into a modern economy.'
>The answer lies in Information Technology.
>Perhaps, says another. But where are our techies?
>Announcement: A new company in Banjul is providing
>e-mail access to gambians. Welcome gambia-l shadow list!
>Postings from news sources are forwarded to the bantaba.
>The news agencies rep. on the bantaba objects to it.
>The bantaba ponders then acts. 'Keep the info. in the bush.'
>Announcement: The Bush List is now operational. News postings
>related to Gambia and Africa can be obtained there.
>Sometimes the mood of the bantaba is playful.
>A monkey joke is delivereed with such potency,
>The entire bantaba doubles over with laughter.
>Oh, by the way. Another new member has been added.
>Welcome to our bantaba, we look forward to your intro.
>Announcement: Jobs and Fellowships FWD.
>Religion is raised and quickly buried. Too sensitive.
>The Duutoo boys poke fun at Gunjurians.
>The international community is assesed.
>Someone pinch me. Is this not our Second Anniversary???
>
>LatJor
>
>LatJor
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 19:16:31 EST
From: SANG1220@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Scandal
Message-ID: <6a61a637.34d11be1@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Amadou, I couldn't agree with you more. Al Nimbara
Thanks
Daddy Sang

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 21:45:49 -0500
From: Andy Lyons <alyons@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Fwd: Gambia High School
Message-ID: <2.2.16.19980130024549.2ea77766@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi all, can anyone help this man?

>Subject: Gambia High School
>
>Dear Mr Lyons
>Many years ago (63-64) I was a VSO volunteer at Gambia High School.
>Probably the best year of my life!
>Now my son, himself a GAP volunteer in Nepal some years ago, is visiting
>The Gambia in a couple of weeks time. I have never been back but am
>keen to help him make some contacts for me and to enrich his own visit.
>Many of my ex-pupils must be in their mid 40's; perhaps some might
>remember me!
>Do you have any details of the Gambia High School. Headteacher etc.
>Also, is there a local paper published in Banjul?
>Wouls appreciate your help.
>Anthony Lunch <101516.2420@compuserve.com>



------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 11:17:41 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <34D34EA5.5F3D@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

SANG1220 wrote:
>
> Bobby, I don't think people are refraining from discussing the scandal in D.C
> rather I suspect everybody is busy getting ready for ramadan or waiting to see
> how this thing unfolds. A word to the wise, for the pres. to be impeached, it
> requires that he be found guilty of using the office of the presidency
> illegally. The mere allegation of a sexual act does not constitude an
> impaechable offense, rather if he's found to have suborne perjury he could be
> in trouble. Even here, problem arises because it becomes a he say, she say
> senario. Perhaps we should wait and see where the chips fall before delving
> into it with vigor.
> Thanks
> Daddy Sang

Hope we all had a happy Koriteh (Eid al Fitr)today
Yes I did not feel to talk about the sex scandal during Ramadan.
Now that fasting is over , I can mention a few things on this matter.
If there were four witnesses to the sexual act Clinton allegedly
performed then there are grounds ( Islamic laws ) for some type of
punishment but according to all reports only his word against hers is
just a foolish case and it should be closed and forgotten.
It is his private life and his wife's and we should all not glorify
these false reports by even talking about it .
I personally do not believe that girl Monika who has a terrible sex
history with other men since she was sixteen or fifteen years old.
Sometimes bad girls like Monika and rejected women like Tripp are used
to set up politicians for slander and revenge.
If President Clinton was not doing his work well then we could hit him
with that issue not his personal sex life.

--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 22:56:57 -0600
From: Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <1.5.4.16.19980129223208.0d17c008@etbu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

With all due respect to all those who have thus far contributed to the
alleged scandal of Clinton's infidelity, i would like to sway the discussion
to another more potent area. For the moment, i think it is inconsequential
whether Clinton is found guilty to have adultered or not. In my opinion, i
think the point that needs to be discussed is whetehr or not the outside
world is taking any lessons as the story unfolds. The not-so-obvious, yet
most important lesson from this drama is that of ACCOUNTABILITY and being
ANSWERABLE to the law. I cannot overemphasize the accountability issue here.

Clinton and AMERICA has demonstrated to the entire universe that nobody
should be above the law. (notice that this single sentence is a paragraph).

Everyone, irrespective of their leverage or authoritative capacity, should
be answerable to the law. Maybe some of the African DESPOTS should be given
free cable so that they can see what is going on in America. Can somebody
help????? I don't mean to be sarcastic, but i find it really fascinating and
commendable that a sitting president is chided, harassed, molested, and
downright trodden by the media without any fear of retribution. What makes
it even more admirable is the fact that Clinton and his Democratic party are
BEGGING the public to wait for the facts before passing judgment.
Putting aside the external forces that are responsible for the
scandal, i think that Clinton's GLOOMY predicament is a SHINING example of
democracy at best. Without openly trying to circumvent the law, Bill has
chosen to be judged by a jury of his peers. Maybe somebody should explain to
us the underlying facts behind "OPERATION GREEN MONEY" without being too
confrontrational. Africa, are we going to learn from the American
experience, or are we going to blatantly ignore history again as we have
done on numerous accounts in the past???? Our future lies in what lessons
we take from this scandal. Our leaders MUST subordinate themselves to the
people they represent rather than act as the MIGHTY overseers of the
yeomanry class.
Just a thought people. I reiterate that i have definitely been
impressed by America's respect for the rule of law in the Lewinski-Gate scandal.

Best of luck to all. ID Mubarak!!!!!!

(Managers, please subscribe Basiru Ndow to the list. His e-mail address is
bn0005@unt.edu ---- bee--en--zero--zero--zero--five. Thanx!!! )
It's Tamsir.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 11:34:46 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: EID MUBARAK!!!!
Message-ID: <34D352A6.6B84@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> Gambia-Lers ALL over the world,
>
> I hope that Ramadhan was as exciting for you as it was for me. I wish each
> one of you and your families a blessed EID MUBARAK, and hope that we get
> tons of blessings for our fasting. And may some of those blessings be
> passed on to our country in particular and the world in general.
>
> It's lunch time now, got to run :-) C'ya later!
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> =========================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
Moe
We had a fantastic Eid in DC and Md area also
Do not eat too much like I am doing right now. The Saudi Embassy had a
party for the kids and it was a real fun day with feelings like Eid not
just another day

--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 11:41:48 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Festive Koriteh Weekend Party
Message-ID: <34D3544C.6EC6@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

BobbySil wrote:
>
> The Atlanta Gambian Community Organization cordially invites you to their
> Koriteh Party to be held at Chastain-Woods Apartement Clubhouse. Tickets are
> $10 per person, to be held on Saturday, January 31 from 10pm onwards. Proceeds
> will go to the funding of the upcoming fourth of July/Gambian re-union
> celebration. For those of you in the metro-Atlanta area please inform others.
>
> For additional information, please contact 404-320-0283 or 770-952-7517, and
> ask for Ablie Njie or Kunta Sissoho respectively.
>
> Thanks, Happy Eid
> Baboucarr Sillah

Thanks Baboucar
In the Washington metropolitan area ,The Gambia muslim Assn is planning
a similar fund raising party on the 14 th of Feb at the MCC in Silver
Spring, Md
(I may be in your area the same weekend so expect my call)
Do you know Momodou Sanneh's tel number?? If so pls give it to me or
please give him my work tel 703 288 1489. Thanks
Hope your Eid party turns out OK. Good luck
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 11:52:16 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Fwd:president's ramadhan message (fwd)
Message-ID: <34D356C0.6993@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Ancha Bala-Gaye u wrote:
>
> It's probably alittle too late for this........but I thought this was
> really nice. Hope everyone had a really nice Korite!!! By the way, can
> someone please give me some info on ALD?? ie the date etc. Are there any
> more concrete plans about the conference and what is the topic to be
> discussed??? (I might have missed that) etc. Thanks!!!
> Ancha.
>
> President's Ramadhan Message
>
> >>December 30, 1997
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Warm greetings to everyone observing the holy month of Ramadan.
> >>>
> >>> For millions of Muslims across our nation and around the world,
> >>>Ramadan marks the time when God revealed the Holy Quran to the Prophet
> >>>Muhammad. During this sacred month, the ninth in the Islamic lunar
> >>>calendar, devout Muslims concentrate on their faith, study the Quran,
> >>>and discipline themselves through fasting between dawn and dusk. They
> >>>seek to answer Islam's call to a life of piety, justice, and peace and
> >>>to draw closer to God and to one another through many hours spent in
> >>>prayer and contemplation.
> >>>
> >>> Ramadan is a powerful reminder to all of us that the true riches of
> >>>life are found, not in material goods, but rather in the gifts of the
> >>>spirit: the ever-present guidance and bountiful mercy of God, the love
> >>>of family and friends, and the freedom to worship according to one's
> >>>own conscience and convictions.
> >>>
> >>> As the crescent moon once again heralds the coming of this season
> >>>of faith and spiritual renewal, Hillary and I extend best wishes for a
> >>>memorable observance.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Thanks Ancha
I heard it live on the Arab network of America (ANA) Radio and satelite
TV. It fealt good that we as muslims are getting the long overdue
recognition we deserve and I hope Eid will be a national holiday as Yom
Kippur / Ras Hashana are now in Md.
By the way the Honarable first lady, Hillary Clinton had an Eid party
today also (second one -last year was the first)at the White house today
at 3.30 pm. I was honoured to be one of the guests. She deserves praise
for her efforts even though politics is involved (- trying to get muslim
votes this coming elections-) We have now become potential voters which
they are trying to tap.
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 23:52:29 EST
From: ELLA23K@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
Message-ID: <7863bda8.34d15c8f@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

No I don't think it is any of our business to talk about the President's
private life. Free as the U.S. may be it is the DUTIES that he was elected to
carry out that we are interested in. This President unlike many other U.S.
presidents have the interest of BLACK people and women at heart. It is
painful that a woman is being used to do the damage to such a fine person. He
was a human being first before becoming a president.

I think Africans, especially Gambians should stay away from this topic. We
know why.

I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate all muslims on their
feast of Eid-el-Fitr. May peace rule the world and let us human beings learn
to love each other.

Cis

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 12:06:42 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Eid day???
Message-ID: <34D35A22.6A61@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

TSaidy1050@aol.com wrote:
>
> Anyway in The Gambia Eid is Friday. Some villages did pray to day though. You
> know the normal argument as to who saw the Moon. Most peole in the North Bank
> have prayed because the Moon was seen at Medina Baye Mass, but the Greater
> Banjul Area did not pray because they claim to have not seen the Moon.
>
> The Supreme Islamic Council were on television last night to announce that
> since no one had claim to see the Moon, Eid will be on Friday. It was after
> this announcement, around 10:30PM, that the people of Medina Baye Mass callled
> SUD FM to annouce the sighting of the Moon. So you can imagine the confusion,
> some have stopped fasting but did pray and others continue their fast and
> every body will pray tomorrow.
>
> Something has to be done to rectify this situation.
>
> PEACE
> Tombong Saidy

Tombong
This problem is over fourteen hundred years old and cannot be solved
until people get educated on the moon sighting criteria . (either the
actual astronomicaly calculated birth of the moon or the actual sighting
of the crescent ) If it is not sighted then it is normal to fast thirty
days which is ok too. We also have this problem here in the USA but the
Shura council of NA has devised a method which applies both scientific
and actual sighting methods without compromising the religion.
For example here in the Washington metropolitan area we knew the birth
of the new moon was yesterday evening just after maghrib but only after
we had a confirmed sighting in Califonia (west coast) around 9.47 pm
that Eid was officially declared. Technology helped a lot
I suggest you use your TV to educate the Masses on this by getting an
expert muslim astrologer clarify this matter. The man who calculates the
prayer times and calender for the Islamic Society of America ( my
neighbour also) has tought me a lot and I will be glad to share some of
his writings with you if you want.
Peace
Happy Eid
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 12:11:24 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: gambia-l 2nd anniversary?
Message-ID: <34D35B3C.5784@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

LatJor,
Good summary indeed and a time to evaluate also
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 12:20:24 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SEX SCANDAL IN THE WHITE HOUSE
Message-ID: <34D35D58.37EA@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

ELLA23K@aol.com wrote:
>
> No I don't think it is any of our business to talk about the President's
> private life. Free as the U.S. may be it is the DUTIES that he was elected to
> carry out that we are interested in. This President unlike many other U.S.
> presidents have the interest of BLACK people and women at heart. It is
> painful that a woman is being used to do the damage to such a fine person. He
> was a human being first before becoming a president.
>
> I think Africans, especially Gambians should stay away from this topic. We
> know why.
>
> I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate all muslims on their
> feast of Eid-el-Fitr. May peace rule the world and let us human beings learn
> to love each other.
>
> Cis

Thanks and your observation is right on the money.
Who is 100 % clean nowadays??
As Christ said " before you talk about the spick in one's eye check the
beam in yours first" ( I hope I quoted right - from my bible class at
SAHS )
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 00:24:15 EST
From: ELLA23K@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambia High School
Message-ID: <670b65b4.34d16401@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Dear Mr L
I think at that time the Ghs was still under the Methodist Mission. If
anything if your son goes to the methodist mission office at Dobson street in
the Gambia he will have a lot of information and help.

The Present Principal of GHS is Mr. William Carr. Lived at Grant Street.
Another person who might be of help is Mrs C.M.R.Cole of long street. Who i
am sure was a teacher at the school at the time She taught English Language.
If you want any specific names or addresses I will be willing to help to the
best of my ability.

I limany Gambians treasure the positive attitude that the VSO have instilled
in our country in the past thankyou for your contribution.

Cis.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 01:56:19 EST
From: BobbySil@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <3493a91.34d17995@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Habib, In a message dated 98-01-29 23:45:39 EST, you write:

<< I personally do not believe that girl Monika who has a terrible sex
history with other men since she was sixteen or fifteen years old.
Sometimes bad girls like Monika and rejected women like Tripp are used
to set up politicians for slander and revenge. >>

Are you saying that you disbelief her because she's got a gloomy sex history.
I'm not too sure about that argument.

BTW the topic was to extend immunity to all those who preffered not to discuss
it.

Sincerely
BS #1

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 02:05:20 EST
From: BobbySil@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <52c74793.34d17bb2@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Tamsir in your message dated 98-01-29 23:39:05 EST, you write:

<< Putting aside the external forces that are responsible for the
scandal, i think that Clinton's GLOOMY predicament is a SHINING example of
democracy at best. Without openly trying to circumvent the law, Bill has
chosen to be judged by a jury of his peers. Maybe somebody should explain to
us the underlying facts behind "OPERATION GREEN MONEY" without being too
confrontrational. Africa, are we going to learn from the American
experience, or are we going to blatantly ignore history again as we have
done on numerous accounts in the past???? >>

Great point pal, this is one of the underlying facts why I brought up the
subject. If we abate topics like these, we will never see the meaning of true
democracy as applied in our backyards.

Cheers,
Baboucarr Sillah

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 04:26:43 EST
From: TSaidy1050@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: GAMBIAN MEETING IN ATLANTA
Message-ID: <7863a078.34d19cd5@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit


There will be a meeting in Atlanta on Saturday, January 31st 1998 and all
Gambians and Friends of The Gambia in Atlanta area are invited. The Majority
Leader of the National Assembly, Honourable Tamsir Jallow and the Minority
Leader, Honourable Kemesseng Jammeh, will be in Atlanta for a few days and
would like to meet with the Gambian community.

They are transiting from Mexico, where they were attending the Global
Parliamentarian Forum.

Details of the meeting could be received from Malafy Jarju (Home tel:
404-288-0026, Office Tel: 404-773-9483). The meeting will be held in the same
hall as the Koriteh Party according to Malafy.

This will be a historical meeting, because this is the fist time both the
ruling party and the opposition will share a podium to discuss issues of
common interest to The Gambia.

Give us your feed backs of the meeting.

PEACE

Tombong Saidy

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 12:42:27 +0100
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Hotels and resthouses in The Gambia
Message-ID: <9B236DF9AF96CF11A5C94044F32190311DB3C1@DKDIFS02>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
boundary="---- =_NextPart_000_01BD2D7C.87360160"

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

------ =_NextPart_000_01BD2D7C.87360160
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Bass, maybe I can do it as an ASCII-file
Asbj=F8rn
=20

> ----------
> Fra: Bassirou Dodou Drammeh[SMTP:kolls567@qatar.net.qa]
> Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sendt: 21. januar 1998 18:13
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: Re: Hotels and resthouses in The Gambia
>=20
> Asbjorn,
> I think you have to Re-send that message,because I
> can't see
> the Attachment you are reffering to as written with WP 6.0.And send
> it
> quick ,and thank you very much in advance because I need those
> addresses
> very much.
>=20
> In the meantime,Keep Up The Good Work Down There!
>=20
>=20
>=20
> Regards
> Bassss!
>=20
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Asbj=F8rn Nordam <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Date: Thursday, January 22, 1998 1:35 AM
> Subject: Hotels and resthouses in The Gambia
>=20
>=20
> One of you from the Gambia-L some times ago asked for hotel adresses.
> >From tours to the Gambia I come to stay in several hotels, and I met
> other toourists. The list enclosed is not total or detailed, or =
divide
> the hotels into a classification-system. I have tried to group them
> depending on the site. All gambians must excuse me for putting the
> list
> here, but I don=B4t remember who were asking. If you are interessted =
you
> can give comments or corrections. Regards from Asbj=F8rn
> My system is WP 6.0. If you who were asking can not open it please
> write
> me.
>=20
>=20
>=20
>=20

------ =_NextPart_000_01BD2D7C.87360160
Content-Type: application/octet-stream;
name="Hotelgam"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: attachment;
filename="Hotelgam"

One of you from the list some times ago asked for hotel adresses.=20
>From my tours to The Gambia I come to stay in several hotels, and I met =
tourists from other hotels. I can not give a total or detailed list, or =
divide the hotel into a classification-sytem. I have tried to put them =
into groups depending on the site.
I ask all the gambians to excuse me that I put my information here on =
the list, but if you find time to read and see corrections please put =
them in, or just delete this information.
Regards from Asbj=9Brn Nordam

The Gambia National Tourist Office
Ministry of Tourism and Culture, The Quadrangle, Banjul, The Gambia
+220-229563 - 227593 - 228496 - 227881 fax +220-227753 - 227034

Cape/Bakau/Fajara - area, distance to Banjul 4-7 Km, and Serrekunda =
to Yundum airport=20

Sunwing Cape St. mary, Bakau +220-495428 fax +220-496102
build 1972,renovated 1991-93, restaurant,bar,pool, 20-50 m.to beach

Cape Point Cape St. Mary, Bakau +220-495005 fax + 220-495005=20
build 1985, renovated 1988 and 1990, restaurant, bar, pool,100 m. to =
beach

African Village Atlantic Road, Bakau +220-495384
build 1976+ 1993, renovated 1987, restaurant,bar,pool,250 m to beach

Safari Garden 20 Street West, Fajara +220-495887
build 1972, renovated 1981 and 1991, restaurant, bar, pool,800 m. to =
beach

Fajara

Fajara Guest House PMB 834 Banjul +220-496122 fax +220 -229689
newly build, 5 min. walk to beach, near Fajara golf course, Fajara =
and Safari Garden hotels

Kotu- Kololi - area, distance to Serekunda 2-3 KM, to Banjul 12-15 Km

Bakotu Kotu Stream Road, Fajara +220-465555 fax +220 465959
restaurant, bar, pool, 100 m to beach

Bungalow Beach 1, Kotu Stream Road,Fajara +220-465288 fax +220-466180
restaurant, bar, pool, 25 m. to beach

Kombo Beach (Novotel) P.O.Box 694, Banjul +220-465466 -465467 -465468

Kotu Strand

Badala Park Kotu Stream, PMB 467, Serrekunda +220-460400 fax =
+220-460402


Kololi - Palma-Rima- Kairaba - area, =20

Kairaba Beach Kololi, PMB 390, Serekunda +220-462940 fax +220-462947
restaurant, bar, pool, 25 m. to beach

Palma Rima +220-463380

Senegambia +220-462717 - 462718 - 462719

Holiday Beach Club PMB 312, Banjul +220-460418 - 460419 fax + 220 - =
460418

Kololi Beach Club +220-464897
Mariatou Beach

N=EFGala Lodge

TAFBEL Maisonettes opposite Kairaba Hotel, apartments for hire
+220 - 460510 - 460511 fax +220-460515

Banjul - area
I know there are several, but I don=EFt have them.

Hotel Atlantic +220-228601 - 228602 - 228603

Laguna (former Wadner Beach)

Serrekunda - area
There are also hotels in Serrekunda

Up-country

Tendaba Camp

Jem Hotel Basse Santa Su +220-668356

Guesthouses:
There are all over the country guesthouses. I can recommend them if you =
are not demanding special service. There is a bed, and you can take a =
bath, and local people can help with food, if not the caretaker. It =
cost near to nothing.


------ =_NextPart_000_01BD2D7C.87360160--

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 12:52:15 +0100 (CET)
From: Theodor Stenevang med <v97tst@sokrates.mip.ki.se>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: SV: Hotels and resthouses in The Gambia
Message-ID: <Pine.BSF.3.96.980130124951.21571C-100000@sokrates.mip.ki.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE

Thanks Asbjorn for the information on hotels and resthouses. Still, I
would like to know if anyone can tell what the prices are, approximately,
for rooms of different standard. Either in dalasis or USD.

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D
I Theodor Stenevang I
I Arm=E9gatan 32:818 I
I S-171 71 Solna I
I I
I phone: +46-8-827417 I
I reply to: theo@mail.com I
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 08:42:48 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: For Entrepreneurs!
Message-ID: <34D1D8D8.1419@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: message/rfc822
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

Received: from ms97201.nethost.com (ms97201.intelemedia.com [207.78.84.10])
by mail.lig.bellsouth.net (8.8.5/8.8.5) with SMTP id IAA09427
for <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>; Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:57:38 -0500 (EST)
From: USATODAY_Express@franchisesolutions.com
Message-Id: <199801291357.IAA09427@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
Received: from intraserver (205.162.64.88)
by ms97201.nethost.com (Connect2-SMTP 4.30A.0000667)
for <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>; Thu, 29 Jan 1998 07:57:34 -0600
Received: by intraserver (VPOP3) with SMTP; Wed, 28 Jan 1998 23:21:08 -0500
To: amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net
Subject: USA TODAY BizOpp Express [Vol. 1 Num. 2]
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 22:52:45 -0500
X-Mailer: Allaire Cold Fusion 3.1
X-Server: VPOP3 V1.2.0c - Registered to: Franchise Solutions

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
THE USA TODAY FRANCHISE AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY EXPRESS
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Volume 1 Number 2, January 28, 1998
PUBLISHED TWICE MONTHLY
COPYRIGHT 1998, Franchise Solutions, Inc.

It is the purpose of this newsletter to keep you informed of interesting
developments that are occurring in high quality companies that offer you
self-employment opportunities. We have sent this current issue to you
because you have recently visited one of our web sites:
http://bizopps.usatoday.com
http://www.franchisesolutions.com

This FREE publication from Franchise Solutions and USA TODAY offers
insider information on legitimate business ownership, provides tips to help
you make informed decisions, and offers glimpses of "hot" new franchise
and other business offerings. This on-line information service is published
and distributed free by Franchise Solutions, Inc. P.O. Box 5178,
Portsmouth, NH 03801, 800-898-4455.
email: usatoday_express@franchisesolutions.com

********************
HAVE YOU HEARD
TACO FROM HELL? TACO BELL is being sued by a Hindu man in
California. It seems the gentleman alleges he ordered a "bean burrito"
and was served and ate a "beef burrito". As you know, cows are sacred
in the Hindu faith, and this gentleman is suing for pain and suffering
and lost wages. In addition, he claims he must go to London for some
religious purification, and also to India to bathe in the Ganges River.
Notwithstanding his right to strong religious beliefs, which are to be
admired and respected, he may have to prove "real" damages
and negligence.
********************

+++ MAKE MONEY ON PEOPLE WHO DRINK!: PARTY SAFE COMPANY
is a leading distributor of talking, coin/bill operated Alcohol Analyzing
Machines for bars, restaurants, and nightclubs and has already added 11
new distributors this year to their growing list. Their distributors enjoy working
in an exciting, money making, home based service industry while aiding in
the fight against drunk driving. Check out what they offer at the link below:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/home/index.cfm?src=823.1.2

********************
NOTE TO AOL USERS:
AOL mail and some other mail programs may not display "links" in a HOT form.
Cut and paste the links we show you into your browser.
********************

+++ FREE LIST OF FRANCHISES: With over two thousand available, which
ones should you look at? If you fill out our interactive questionnaire telling us
about your interests and finances, we'll email you back a custom tailored list:

Click here:
http://usatoday.fransol.com/pifform.cfm?src=823.1.2

+++ KEEP THE CUSTOMERS COMING-CARPETMATE, a rapidly growing
Kulpsville, Pennsylvania based carpet cleaning franchise, has recorded
exceptional franchisee satisfaction ratings. The key to franchisee satisfaction
and success with this low-investment, low royalty, home based business is
founded in its marketing-driven approach to acquiring and retaining customers.
If you like sales and are customer satisfaction oriented, check them out:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/home/index.cfm?src=823.1.2

+++ BE A BUSINESS BROKER: SUNBELT BUSINESS BROKERS, the
nation's largest business brokerage franchise with nearly 150 offices,
continues to gain momentum. According to Dennis D'Annunzio, VP,
"Our concept and timing are exceptional, and we expect to put many new
franchisees into our system in 1998 to help people buy and sell businesses
throughout the US. Our ability to help our franchisees promote their listings
through our new site at USA Today -line has been a major breakthrough."
For more information on the Sunbelt Business Brokerage Opportunity,
please click on the link below:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/client_page.cfm?id=67&src=823.1.2

********************
QUESTION FROM A READER:
James Evans wrote, "How do you find the EXACT earning potential for a
franchise in your area?"
Answer: You don't. A few franchises offer 'earnings claims', but most do
not. The key is asking a lot of questions of the existing franchisees to
query their financial satisfaction. They'll tell you...
********************

+++ HAIR'S LOOKING AT YOU- GREAT CLIPS "Styles" the opening of its
1000th Salon! Building on a strong commitment to provide the trendiest
styles at affordable prices, Great Clips for Hair, the nation's fastest growing
haircare franchise, recently announced the opening of its 1000th salon.
Open in some 50 markets in the U.S. and Canada, Great Clips projects it
will continue its rapid salon expansion at the rate of 30 percent per year.
You don't have to be able to cut hair...look here:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/client_page.cfm?id=323&src=823.1.2

+++ POSTNET'S FRANCHISEES HAVE THEIR OWN WEB SITES:
Through a strategic alliance with The QuikPages, PostNet Postal
and Business Services franchisees can now bring their customers
online via individually customized web sites. PostNet franchisees can
also act as a clearinghouse for e-mail and fax messages for those
businesses with limited technology resources.

http://usatoday.fransol.com/client_page.cfm?id=45&src=823.1.2

********************
QUESTION FROM A READER:
John Crews wrote, "I'm a 42 year old engineer, tired of the corporate
stress, don't want to move, want a franchise with a high probability of
success, want to make $100k a year, don't want to invest a lot, don't
like being stuck in one spot. How can I find a franchise?"
Answer: Keep your job; find a hobby to lower your stress.
********************

+++ NATIONAL CLAIMS SERVICE IS HELPING PHYSICIANS: Medical Billing
is not only one of today's hottest home-based business, it will remain so well
into the next century, and National Claims Service has helped more people
succeed in this industry than nearly all of their competitors combined.
Numerous national publications have highlighted the success of NCS billing
centers, and with the release of NCS's state-of-the-art ClaimsLoader 2000
software, company personnel are projecting a 50% growth rate. To contact
NCS now to become a part of this surge, click on the link below:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/home/index.cfm?src=823.1.2

+++ CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY: INTERACTIVE VIDEOCONFERENCING
CENTERS, INC. today announced that it has entered into franchise
agreements covering 6 Central America countries and the Caribbean
Islands. IVC is currently negotiating franchise agreements for Mexico,
Kuwait, Oatar, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. IVC is also franchising
throughout the U.S. For more information on how this opportunity can
change your life, click the link below:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/links/index_2.cfm?id=132&src=823.1.2

********************
NEW! NEW! NEW!
4000 BUSINESSES FOR SALE ON THE INTERNET AT ONE SPOT!
Sunbelt Business Brokers, with 130 offices in the US, is based in
Charleston, SC. They have a brand new site at USA TODAY Online
incorporating a searchable database filled with thousands of businesses.
Look for a business for sale in your town by clicking on this link:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/bus_res.cfm?src=823.1.2
********************

+++ BROKER PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR BUSINESS NEEDS:
SAVEIT! PRODUCTS: In addition to overnight delivery and long distance
telephone services, you can now sell office supplies, business furniture, and
safety & maintenance equipment supplies as a member of SaveIt! The
company does the billing and customer service, all you have to do is "sell"
to make money. The best part is you can start this business for only $1900.
To see more, here's a link:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/client_page.cfm?id=194&src=823.1.2

+++ OVER 100 high quality franchises and business opportunities are
now presented in the on-line edition of USA TODAY, in the Business
Opportunities Section. Also, this premier one-stop site for self-
employment seekers offers interviews of company presidents, past
articles about franchises appearing in the USA TODAY print edition, and links
directly to all the top franchise and business opportunity home pages.
Take a look at this now:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/index.cfm?src=823.1.2

********************
DO YOU HAVE FRIEND WHO WANTS TO OWN A BUSINESS?
Please forward this email newsletter to them! If they want to continue
receiving it have them email a request to us at
usatoday_express@franchisesolutions.com with SUBSCRIBE
in the subject field. Thank you!
********************

+++ MARKET TIMING IS EVERYTHING! EAGLE'S NEST offers panelized
homes in traditional to contemporary styles, ranging from 600 - 4,000 square
feet. Exceptional quality and architectural design typify their homes. The
company is seeking representatives - full or part time-to earn up to $5,000 to
$15,000 per sale, working with local realtors and builders. A $5,000 house
deposit is ALL that's required to build your dream home or a career.
For more information visit the link below.

http://usatoday.fransol.com/links/index_2.cfm?id=280&src=823.1.2

+++ OH, OH. BETTER GET MAACO: MAACO's recent 25TH Anniversary
convention held in San Diego generated a flood of memories for President
Mark Martino. But these memories that began more than 25 years ago pale
in comparison to his anticipation of what lies ahead for the MAACO chain.
He put it in terms of a mission statement: "MAACO will endeavor to become
the best franchise opportunity in North America, as recognized by our
franchisees." Find out how you can be a part of the company that paints more
cars than anyone by clicking the link below:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/client_page.cfm?id=14&src=823.1.2

********************
HOME BASED BUSINESSES ARE HOT!!!!! TAKE A LOOK:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/home/index.cfm?src=823.1.2
********************

+++ EXPOS AND FRANCHISE SHOW SCHEDULES:
In Canada, you need to go to Toronto on February 13, 14, 15 for the
Canadian National Franchising Expo. For information, call 1-800-463-SHOW.
In the US, there's lots of show activity: The Entrepreneur Expo is in
Phoenix, AZ on February 7-8 at the Phoenix Civic Plaza, and in Portland
OR on Feb. 14th, 15th. (Call 800-800-0035 for info) The giant
International Franchise Association show is in Chicago at the
Merchandise Mart, May 29th to the 31st.

********************
QUESTION FROM A READER:
Roger Haynie wrote, " There are thousands of baby boomers out there like me
who would like to take early retirement and start a new challenge with a
business of their own. There's so many franchises to choose from... how do
I select one."
Answer: First of all, 'know thyself' and all your strengths and weaknesses.
Decide what it is you would like to do. Understand what your real job
description would be in a particular type of franchise, and feel comfortable
in your ability to perform. Prepare to work harder than you ever have before.
Have in depth conversations with a very large number of franchisees within a
particular "system". Look very closely at all the competition. Get the
support of your family, then do it.
********************

+++ FRAME EVERYTHING! DECK THE WALLS was recently featured
on Home and Garden television in two half-hour home decorating segments.
DTW's Vice President of Operations, Connie Williams, demonstrated how
to frame family mementos in shadow boxes and how to tie home decor
into framing pieces through wrapping mats with fabric. Deck The Walls
is the nation's leading art and custom framing franchisor with over 200
locations in major regional shopping malls. Deck The Walls is actively
seeking qualified candidates to become franchisees. Click on the link below:

http://usatoday.fransol.com/links/index_2.cfm?id=32&src=823.1.2

********************
GET THE MONEY!:
Here are the companies to call for business loans:
AT&T Capital at 800-221-7252, the Money Store at 800-362-3071,
or Banc One Corp at 414-765-3000.
********************

STAY SAFE: BUY THIS BOOK!!!!!
"How To Buy a Hot Franchise and Not Get Burned" is the definitive
self-help manual designed to assist any individual investigate, evaluate,
and select the right business for them. The price is $29.95, and it can
be ordered by calling 800-395-7537. Check out the table of contents by
clicking below:

http://fransol.com/book.htm

********************
NEWS ITEM:
INCOME OPPORTUNITIES MAGAZINE will close it's doors after the release
of its February issue. This is the second major "business opportunity" publisher
to stop publishing in 1998, the other being Franchise Times. What's up?
********************

HELPFUL HINT:
WHAT'S THE SECRET OF BEING A SUCCESSFUL FRANCHISEE?
Let's start with the first criteria: Don't buy a business on emotion. Buy it
logically. Can you really fill the role that will be required of you? Ask the
existing franchisees what the job description REALLY is!

********************
QUESTION FROM A READER:
David Thompson wrote, "I have a successful small business I would like to
franchise. How do I do it?"
Answer: Don't do it. There are other expansion methods you can explore to get
you into a multi-unit situation, while conserving your capital. In this
manner, you also avoid the restrictions, legalities, over regulation, and
expense of 'franchising'. You need a lot more than one store to become a
successful franchise. Be careful, there are a lot of "sharks" out there that
will "help" you franchise!
********************

IMPORTANT NOTICE: We would like to send you future issues of this
informative newsletter twice monthly. However, if you would like us to
remove your name from our list and not receive any future free issues
offering great information and helpful tips, please reply to this message
and put "REMOVE" in the subject line of your email. Thank You!

If there are content areas or subjects you would like to see in future
issues, please let us know.

********************************************************
GOT QUESTIONS? WE'D LOVE TO ANSWER THEM.
Send your questions to us at usatoday_express@franchisesolutions.com
We'll provide you with the best answers we can, and if we can't help, we
can probably steer you in the right direction.
********************************************************

Copyright (c) 1998, Franchise Solutions, Inc. All Rights Reserved.





------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 98 06:31:40 -00800 (PST)
From: msjaiteh@mtu.edu (Malanding S Jaiteh)
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu (Gambia lers)
Subject: Eid El Fitr - from Malanding S Jaiteh
Message-ID: <199801301420.GAA04644@mxu3.u.washington.edu>

Guess what!! Malanding S Jaiteh has just sent you an animated greeting card
You can pick up your personal greeting by connecting to the following WWW Address

http://www.bluemountain.com/cards/box2238a/ga332uygbkyubgs.htm

(Your greeting card will be available for the next 30 days)
This service is FREE! :) HAVE a good day and have fun!

____________________________________________________________
Accessing your card indicates your agreement with our Website Rules
posted at the bottom of the following Web location: (You're welcome to send a
free card to someone at this location) http://www.bluemountain.com


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 09:58:29 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'GAMBIA-L'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>,
"'Amile Summers'"
Subject: FW: Per minute charges for your internet service -Reply
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988F41@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
boundary="---- =_NextPart_000_01BD2D65.9F59EF20"

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

------ =_NextPart_000_01BD2D65.9F59EF20
Content-Type: text/plain

FYI, I requested confirmation from our Information Systems department
regarding the above. This is the response I received.

May the blessings of a successful Ramadan be with you through out this
coming year.
Keretha
> ----------
> From: Rick R. Thompson
> Sent: Friday, January 30, 1998 9:46 AM
> To: Keretha Cash
> Cc: Information Systems; Robert D. Isacson; Terrence J. Navin
> Subject: FW: Per minute charges for your internet service -Reply
>
> Here's the response I received from the FCC about the
> per-minute-charge issue.
>
> Rick Thompson
> Information Systems Manager
> mailto:rthompso@rbvdnr.com
> http://www.ReinhartLaw.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ISP [SMTP:ISP@fcc.gov]
> Sent: Friday, January 30, 1998 9:35 AM
> To: Rick R. Thompson
> Subject: FW: Per minute charges for your internet service -Reply
>
> This is an automated response to the message you sent to isp@fcc.gov.
> We established this mailbox for informal comments about usage of the
> public switched telephone network by Internet access and information
> service providers for a proceeding on this matter in 1997.
>
> If you are responding to a message stating that local phone companies
> have asked the FCC for permission to impose per-minute charges for
> Internet access, please be aware that this information is out of date.
> The FCC decided in May 1997 NOT to allow imposition of interstate
> access charges on Internet service providers. There is no comment
> period currently open in this proceeding.
>
> More information on Access Charges and the ISP proceeding is available
> at <http://www.fcc.gov/isp.html>
>
> Look for more features and announcements on our Web site,
> <http://www.fcc.gov/>, in the future!
>
> updated 1/6/98
>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 12:38:51 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <34D2102B.3436@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

BobbySil@aol.com wrote:
>
> Habib, In a message dated 98-01-29 23:45:39 EST, you write:
>
> << I personally do not believe that girl Monika who has a terrible sex
> history with other men since she was sixteen or fifteen years old.
> Sometimes bad girls like Monika and rejected women like Tripp are used
> to set up politicians for slander and revenge. >>
>
> Are you saying that you disbelief her because she's got a gloomy sex history.
> I'm not too sure about that argument.
>
> BTW the topic was to extend immunity to all those who preffered not to discuss
> it.
>
> Sincerely
> BS #1

Yes
No woman in her correct mind would go about saying she had sex with this
and that especially other people's husbands publicly. I think that is a
viscous and distructive thing to do to anyone's marriage. If she had a
relationship with a married man which is her private affair, it should
remain private . Period.
Linda Tripp seems to have a dubious agenda with bad intentions
obviously. She also may be looking for ransome money.
Sorry but please Let's leave Clinton alone.
Habib


--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 13:16:27 EST
From: BobbySil@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: GAMBIAN MEETING IN ATLANTA
Message-ID: <fc50df05.34d218fd@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Tombong, In a message dated 98-01-30 05:51:37 EST, you write:

<< This will be a historical meeting, because this is the fist time both the
ruling party and the opposition will share a podium to discuss issues of
common interest to The Gambia. >>

You're right it will be historical. We will make our analysis and report the
facts.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 17:48:40 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Scandal (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9801301751.A9982-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


With the hope that I didn't misunderstand anything you said, these are my
comments. If I did misunderstand, I appologise in advance.

Habib wrote:

>Yes
>No woman in her correct mind would go about saying she had sex with this
>and that especially other people's husbands publicly.

I'm sorry, I don't see why not. This is not Saudi Arabia where a woman
would not dare tell she slept with someone. It's a "free" country and you
may say whatever you like. Unless of course, you and your partner decided
to keep it quiet.

>I think that is a viscous and distructive thing to do to anyone's
>marriage.

If the rumour is true, then I think the married party should have thought
about commiting adultery before engaging in the activity.

>If she had a relationship with a married man which is her
>private affair, it should remain private . Period.

Actually, it's the married man's private affair too. And I don't think
that he should be able to have his cake and eat it too (in this case, be
married AND be able to have an extramarital affair without being found
out). She has nothing to lose really, (except her reputation....if she
cares about it!), but he may lose his family........unless of
course, he doesn't think they're worth his devotion and love.


>Linda Tripp seems to have a dubious agenda with bad intentions
obviously.
>She also may be looking for ransome money.
Habib

This is possible.
Ancha.



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 21:17:57 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal (fwd)
Message-ID: <34D289D5.4AF1@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Ancha Bala-Gaye u wrote:
>
> I'm sorry, I don't see why not. This is not Saudi Arabia where a woman
> would not dare tell she slept with someone. It's a "free" country and you
> may say whatever you like.

What's "free" in this country? It's "buy one get one free," "free if
you spend so much," "free if you take these strings too," etc.

Well, kidding aside, even the USA's "freedom" comes with some legal,
social and moral restraints. Examples: you may not utter statements that
are likely to provoke a violent reaction ("fighting words"). You are
also not "free" to yell "fire" in a crowded movie theater.

And what's the relevance of Saudi Arabia to your response?

Other than those matters, I tend to agree with your overall premise.

Amadou SJ

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 22:44:35 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Help (especially from those in The Gambia)!
Message-ID: <34D29E23.164B@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Gambia-l:

I should be taking about 20 students and one other faculty member to
Senegal and The Gambia as part of a "Foreign Study" project from July
10-21, 1998. It's an attempt to forge some link between the University
of Tennessee and institutions in Senegambia.

The participants are very excited about the opportunity. They are
putting together plans to collect books, computers, etc. as donations to
the Gambian and Senegalese institutions. Various university departments
are pooling their resources to make the trip a reality. Hopefully this
will be the first of many trips to come.

I received excellent input from my good friend, Dr. Ebrima Sall, on
where to go, who to see, etc. in Senegal. I need similar suggestions
for The Gambia. It would also be nice if we can get housing (dorm rooms
okay) and transportation at reasonable rates (particularly from those
receiving the donations).

The course title is "The TransAtlantic Slave Trade."

Let me know what you think.

Amadou SJ

ps: Perhaps the Kartong International Airport will be inaugurated by
then! Ooops! I meant GUNJUR!

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 20:26:11 -0800 (PST)
From: "D. Singhateh" <dawdas@u.washington.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <Pine.A41.3.96a.980130200215.30498B-100000@dante05.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Thank you Tamsir, for a job well done. This couldn't have been
better scripted if you asked the best play writers in Hollywood to put in
words what you were able to put across in few paragraphs. Not only is the
story and the emotions it unleashes powerful, but the style is
just as commendable. And yes, you are right, there is a lesson for us
(AFRICA) to learn as this scandal unfolds. It always baffles me how we (
AFRICA) end up at the short end of democracy.
I just thought I take a moment to thank you for your thoughtfulness.
Take care every one,
Dawda Singhateh.



On Thu, 29 Jan 1998, Tamsir Mbai wrote:

> With all due respect to all those who have thus far contributed to the
> alleged scandal of Clinton's infidelity, i would like to sway the discussion
> to another more potent area. For the moment, i think it is inconsequential
> whether Clinton is found guilty to have adultered or not. In my opinion, i
> think the point that needs to be discussed is whetehr or not the outside
> world is taking any lessons as the story unfolds. The not-so-obvious, yet
> most important lesson from this drama is that of ACCOUNTABILITY and being
> ANSWERABLE to the law. I cannot overemphasize the accountability issue here.
>
> Clinton and AMERICA has demonstrated to the entire universe that nobody
> should be above the law. (notice that this single sentence is a paragraph).
>
> Everyone, irrespective of their leverage or authoritative capacity, should
> be answerable to the law. Maybe some of the African DESPOTS should be given
> free cable so that they can see what is going on in America. Can somebody
> help????? I don't mean to be sarcastic, but i find it really fascinating and
> commendable that a sitting president is chided, harassed, molested, and
> downright trodden by the media without any fear of retribution. What makes
> it even more admirable is the fact that Clinton and his Democratic party are
> BEGGING the public to wait for the facts before passing judgment.
> Putting aside the external forces that are responsible for the
> scandal, i think that Clinton's GLOOMY predicament is a SHINING example of
> democracy at best. Without openly trying to circumvent the law, Bill has
> chosen to be judged by a jury of his peers. Maybe somebody should explain to
> us the underlying facts behind "OPERATION GREEN MONEY" without being too
> confrontrational. Africa, are we going to learn from the American
> experience, or are we going to blatantly ignore history again as we have
> done on numerous accounts in the past???? Our future lies in what lessons
> we take from this scandal. Our leaders MUST subordinate themselves to the
> people they represent rather than act as the MIGHTY overseers of the
> yeomanry class.
> Just a thought people. I reiterate that i have definitely been
> impressed by America's respect for the rule of law in the Lewinski-Gate scandal.
>
> Best of luck to all. ID Mubarak!!!!!!
>
> (Managers, please subscribe Basiru Ndow to the list. His e-mail address is
> bn0005@unt.edu ---- bee--en--zero--zero--zero--five. Thanx!!! )
> It's Tamsir.
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 20:40:03 PST
From: "latjor ndow" <latjor@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: new member
Message-ID: <19980131044003.3532.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Greetings:
Basirou Ndow has been added to thelist and we welcome him to the
bantaba. We look forward to your intro. and participation in the
discussions. Our address is: gambia-l@u.washington.edu

LatJor

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:06:42 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
Message-ID: <01bd2e06$04f3a600$3d2385c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

ALPHA Robinson WROTE:-

As I hate to speculate, I'll leave it to you to answer or not answer
as you like. One thing is certain though. In your contribution you
haven't provided any alternative. To say that the way should be paved
for private investors is so cheap that I would not like to believe
this is all you have to offer the Gambian people.
****************************************************************************
***********************
Hello Mr.Robinson!
I am terribly sorry for the belated
response;its mainly because your timing was a little bit inconvenient, since
your contribution came at a time when I was somewhat busy trying to catch up
with what I had missed so much,namely,eating during the daytime.I hope you
won't misunderstand me here.I am neither a Badibunka nor is my surname
Jaiteh Kunda Nkoo or something like Ceesay etc.;its just that its all too
human to be impatient to have that daytime bite of Beena Chinn after thirty
grueling days of fasting. So,thank you very much for your interest in what I
wrote and the effort you made to respond to it.

Since Pa Musa Jallow,one of our men on the ground back home,has already made
my job easier by the response he made,these couple of Riyals I would want to
subscribe to our nations "Osusu" (Economy) debate would be brief.

If I understand you correctly,you do not accept my assertion that because
Pdois is a socialist party,the way it sees the economic problems in the
Gambia and the solutions it proposes for them are more or less related to
the Socialist view of how economic problems should be handled by the
state.And if I am wrong in assuming that,then I do not know what the letter
"S" in the acronym PDOIS stands for.But if you say that: "Yes,the S stands
for socialism,but No,it has no bearing on how the Pdois people think" then
the "Intellectual Honesty" or lack of it that you have been lecturing us
about here should be looked at again very carefully!

Your concerns about the downside of the market forces are well founded.But
we can talk about ways and means of minimizing the brutal impact of those
forces on the weaker sectors of our society, while at the same time
accepting the fact that, that economic arrangement is the only one that has
been able to usher in modernity,efficiency and self-sufficiency in all the
societies we know about.I don't believe it would be in the interest of
anyone in the Gambia if we delude ourselves into believing that we could
invent a second or third way that has not been experimented anywhere.

The third issue you mentioned relates to the salaries of members of our
National Assembly.Again,your concerns are well founded:most of our peasants
are in deplorable conditions.But we cannot also forget the fact that unless
we provide our leadership with a respectable standard of living,they would
end up doing to us what they have always done since
independence,namely,emptying the national coffers and use it for themselves
and their immediate families.And the people who would then end up being hurt
most would be the very people you are now trying to protect,namely,the
peasants.Its just a question of being pragmatic and nothing else.

Finally,I wish you a happy Koriteh and hope that you would Keep Up The Good
Work Down There!


Regards Bassss!









-----Original Message-----
From: Alpha Robinson <garob1@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Wednesday, January 28, 1998 6:47 PM
Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!


Bass,

As HAlifa stated in his posting, the issue of the national economy is
a matter which "requires more than common sense economics.... It requires
intellectual honesty on the part of decision makers and their
fidelity to propositions that are fully grounded on irrefutable
premises." I would like to add that this issue is a matter of life
and death. If we choose to solve it creatively we can guarantee ourselves
and
our children a meaningful life under the earth, if we choose to be
otherwise we will remain the scum of the earth (please excuse my
language)

Bass heed those words for they are very crucial especially to us the
"cream of Africa". We the educated ones cannot allow ourselves to
indulde in intellectual dishonesty for the hopes of our people are on
our shoulders.

Bass PDOIS had stated earlier, well before Jammeh's days in its
manifesto what its stand on the private sector is and this is exactly
what Halifa reflected on the posting. PDOIS says come private
investment well and good but we should not fold our hands and wait
for it. Now if you go about calling PDOIS a" socialist or
Semi-Socialist party and that as a result the economic strategy it is
now putting forward and confidently portraying as the only cure for
the economic ailment of our nation are a direct product of Marxian
Econnomic analysis which is by default hostile to market forces" it
makes me really wonder on two counts:
First, I wonder whether you have made any efforts to know what PDOIS'
economic policy is.
Secondly, I wonder what you were really up to when all of a sudden
the cold war jargon downs on you from God knows where. It's awkward
because in Halifa's analysis neither Socialism nor Marxism was
mentioned.

As I hate to speculate, I'll leave it to you to answer or not answer
as you like. One thing is certain though. In your contribution you
haven't provided any alternative. To say that the way should be paved
for private investors is so cheap that I would not like to believe
this is all you have to offer the Gambian people.

Finally, let us be alerrt to the fact that the development of the
Gambia entails more than enriching a few educated Gambians. Our people
Bass, the vast majority of the Gambian people are living in
deplorable conditions. Therefore any policy which attempts to
sideline them cannot be a meaningful one. Perhaps it is time Bass for
you, me and our likes, the educated Gambians to realise that ALL the
Gambian people want to have a better life. I am sure if you were not
lucky to be educated you would heve been talking differently today.
If you were a farmer earning ONLY one thousand Dalasis or two PER
ANNUM you would not be telling us that theMONTHLY salaries of members of
perliament
SEVEN THOUSAND Dalasis is meagre. If you were an unlucky farmer, you
would not have been saying that the resources of the country should
be given to a few Gambians to enjoy.

Finally, I would like to add that one does not have to study economics
to understand certain very basic things. Of course a person who
studies economics is more likely to be exposed to economic issue. I
would like to conted here and now though that he who makes it a
priority can also become conversat with economic issues without
holding a degree in it. Remember that Malcolm X, one of the most
influencial African Americans, did not posses any
degree in any of the issues he was very eloquent in. Knowlwdge
belongs only to those who sought it, so it is nonesense to think that
only economic graduates can talk about economic issues.

much respect

Alpha



------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 10:40:19 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
Cc: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Help (especially from those in The Gambia)!
Message-ID: <19980131094148.AAA18824@nijii>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Amadou,
I have just been to The Gambia last November with 19 Danish students
and two teachers. The trip had been a greet success partly because
both the hosts and guests learnt a lot from each other during the
period. We went to Kuntaur Junior Secondary School ( Kuntaur
Fullakunda) where the students stayed for 10 days. We stayed in a
compound and they were sleeping on mats (Baso lu) we bought in Niamina
Jarreng on our way. The rest of the other 11 days were spent in the
Kombos.

I can see that your trip will only last for 11 days which in my
opinion is seems to be very short. I don't know if you intend to just
stay in the greater Banjul area or you want to also go to the
provinces.

However, if you have the time, you could travel to Janjangbureh
(formally George Town) and visit the old slave house there. You also
have the Armitage High School there on the Island. At the same time
you have the chance to visit the Stone circles at Wasu which is not
far from there. There is a rest house in Janjanbureh.

I have a lot of photos from the trip which I shall put on a website
and I will inform you later where you can find them.

Torstein had been of great help during our preparation for the trip
and he had already arranged for a mini- bus from the GPTC which
transported us there and came back to pick the students at the end of
the trip.

We made some research on where we will stay during our next trip
hopefully by the end of this year. There is the Rosa Hostel,
belonging to the Girl guides association where you can have a room
with two beds for only D110 including breakfast. The lunch costs D25
and D35 for dinner. Their phone number is 390510.

The hostel is around Kairaba Avenue (the old pipeline road).

Regards
Momodou Camara

On 30 Jan 98 at 22:44, A. Scattred Janneh wrote:

> Gambia-l:
>
> I should be taking about 20 students and one other faculty member to
> Senegal and The Gambia as part of a "Foreign Study" project from
> July 10-21, 1998. It's an attempt to forge some link between the
> University of Tennessee and institutions in Senegambia.

>
> The participants are very excited about the opportunity. They are
> putting together plans to collect books, computers, etc. as
> donations to the Gambian and Senegalese institutions. Various
> university departments are pooling their resources to make the trip
> a reality. Hopefully this will be the first of many trips to come.
>
> I received excellent input from my good friend, Dr. Ebrima Sall, on
> where to go, who to see, etc. in Senegal. I need similar
> suggestions for The Gambia. It would also be nice if we can get
> housing (dorm rooms okay) and transportation at reasonable rates
> (particularly from those receiving the donations).
>
> The course title is "The TransAtlantic Slave Trade."
>
> Let me know what you think.
>
> Amadou SJ
>
> ps: Perhaps the Kartong International Airport will be inaugurated by
> then! Ooops! I meant GUNJUR!

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 17:40:59 +0200 (EET)
From: edi sidibeh <lha7edsi@kyamk.fi>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: suggestion
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.96.980131164600.8497C-100000@it4.kyamk.fi>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Dear People
I am first of all apologising for any offence that might a
encounter, by using a language that was imposed to us with a little
choice to be able to express myself in the developing world,since we do
not have either mandinka or wollof in common. However, my suggestion
to the bantaba as a concern individual, base on the fact that some
member are acting on issues off-handedly.If i am not mistaking,this
bantaba is for gambians and pro-gambians to come forward with their
opinions concerning ways to purvey our MOTHER LAND (THE GAMBIA).If
that is the case, why can't we respect each other's opinion? It's very
annoying seeing intellectual people with great idea,sharing the same
common goal, insulting eother ach or taking matters personally.The Gambia
at this present moment doesn't need that, but the act of procuring
provisions to brighten or polish Her up again.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 09:41:26 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Fwd: GRATITUDE]
Message-ID: <34D33816.2873@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: message/rfc822
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

Message-ID: <34D33586.D07@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 09:30:30 -0500
From: "A. Scattred Janneh" <amadou@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net>
Reply-To: amadou@Mail.lig.bellsouth.net
Organization: Home
X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.01C-BLS20 (Win95; U)
MIME-Version: 1.0
To: gambia-@u.washington.edu
Subject: GRATITUDE
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Gambia-l:

I am very elated by the invaluable advise I have been receiving from the
list on my planned trip to The Gambia. Special thanks to Ebrima Sall,
Momodou Camara, Tombong Saidy, Bass, and Malanding.

You've pointed out some things that I took for granted: bureaucratic
"red-tape," exploring well beyond the Kombos, time, contacts, etc.

I am indeed grateful to all of you for sharing your experiences and
knowledge.

Amadou SJ


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:46:18 PST
From: "momodou njie" <momhnjie@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
Message-ID: <19980131164620.28992.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Hi Everyone,

I think there are real difficulties with Bass' arguments. I
am sure he is quite capable of identifying those difficulties
himself; especially, now that Ramadan is over. It seems to me
also that Bass needs to do more research regarding PDOIS and
what the party stands for. This is not to start an argument
but a simple plea for objectivity. BTW more than 2/3 of EU
governments, including Britain, France and Germany, are
socialists. Also, nationalisation, or renationalisation, is very
much on the agenda in some EU countries, including Britain. I
think what we should be concerned about is what works in our
particular situation. We should also be more flexible in the
way we describe political philosophies. If a party says it is
socialist, I think we should take the trouble to study their
type of socialism, instead of branding them Marxists, Communists
etc. I would be very disappointed if a modern party like
PDOIS employs Marxists principles, hook, line and sinker, in
the Gambian context.

I intended to type 2 or 3 sentences. Sorry for the
inconvenience.

Regards,
Momodou


>From gambia-l-owner@u.washington.edu Fri Jan 30 21:10:06 1998
>Received: from host (lists.u.washington.edu [140.142.56.13])
> by lists3.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
SMTP
> id VAA29236; Fri, 30 Jan 1998 21:09:57 -0800
>Received: from mxu2.u.washington.edu (mxu2.u.washington.edu
[140.142.32.9])
> by lists.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.05) with
ESMTP
> id VAA31320 for <gambia-l@lists.u.washington.edu>; Fri, 30 Jan 1998
21:09:43 -0800
>Received: from qatar.net.qa (qatar.net.qa [194.133.33.11])
> by mxu2.u.washington.edu (8.8.4+UW97.07/8.8.4+UW97.09) with
SMTP
> id VAA26897 for <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>; Fri, 30 Jan 1998
21:09:40 -0800
>Received: from q-tel.qatar.net by qatar.net.qa
(SMI-8.6/Qatar-Internet-Sendmail It's now Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:03:38
-0300)
> id IAA22843; Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:03:38 -0300
>Message-Id: <01bd2e06$04f3a600$3d2385c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
>Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:06:42 +0300
>Reply-To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
>Sender: GAMBIA-L-owner@u.washington.edu
>Precedence: bulk
>From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
>To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
>Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>X-To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
>X-Priority: 3
>X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
>X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V4.71.1712.3
>X-Listprocessor-Version: 8.1 beta -- ListProcessor(tm) by CREN
>
>ALPHA Robinson WROTE:-
>
>As I hate to speculate, I'll leave it to you to answer or not answer
>as you like. One thing is certain though. In your contribution you
>haven't provided any alternative. To say that the way should be paved
>for private investors is so cheap that I would not like to believe
>this is all you have to offer the Gambian people.
>****************************************************************************
>***********************
>Hello Mr.Robinson!
> I am terribly sorry for the belated
>response;its mainly because your timing was a little bit inconvenient,
since
>your contribution came at a time when I was somewhat busy trying to
catch up
>with what I had missed so much,namely,eating during the daytime.I hope
you
>won't misunderstand me here.I am neither a Badibunka nor is my surname
>Jaiteh Kunda Nkoo or something like Ceesay etc.;its just that its all
too
>human to be impatient to have that daytime bite of Beena Chinn after
thirty
>grueling days of fasting. So,thank you very much for your interest in
what I
>wrote and the effort you made to respond to it.
>
>Since Pa Musa Jallow,one of our men on the ground back home,has already
made
>my job easier by the response he made,these couple of Riyals I would
want to
>subscribe to our nations "Osusu" (Economy) debate would be brief.
>
>If I understand you correctly,you do not accept my assertion that
because
>Pdois is a socialist party,the way it sees the economic problems in the
>Gambia and the solutions it proposes for them are more or less related
to
>the Socialist view of how economic problems should be handled by the
>state.And if I am wrong in assuming that,then I do not know what the
letter
>"S" in the acronym PDOIS stands for.But if you say that: "Yes,the S
stands
>for socialism,but No,it has no bearing on how the Pdois people think"
then
>the "Intellectual Honesty" or lack of it that you have been lecturing
us
>about here should be looked at again very carefully!
>
>Your concerns about the downside of the market forces are well
founded.But
>we can talk about ways and means of minimizing the brutal impact of
those
>forces on the weaker sectors of our society, while at the same time
>accepting the fact that, that economic arrangement is the only one
that has
>been able to usher in modernity,efficiency and self-sufficiency in all
the
>societies we know about.I don't believe it would be in the interest of
>anyone in the Gambia if we delude ourselves into believing that we
could
>invent a second or third way that has not been experimented anywhere.
>
>The third issue you mentioned relates to the salaries of members of our
>National Assembly.Again,your concerns are well founded:most of our
peasants
>are in deplorable conditions.But we cannot also forget the fact that
unless
>we provide our leadership with a respectable standard of living,they
would
>end up doing to us what they have always done since
>independence,namely,emptying the national coffers and use it for
themselves
>and their immediate families.And the people who would then end up being
hurt
>most would be the very people you are now trying to protect,namely,the
>peasants.Its just a question of being pragmatic and nothing else.
>
>Finally,I wish you a happy Koriteh and hope that you would Keep Up The
Good
>Work Down There!
>
>
>Regards Bassss!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Alpha Robinson <garob1@cip.hx.uni-paderborn.de>
>To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
><gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
>Date: Wednesday, January 28, 1998 6:47 PM
>Subject: Re:My Commentary On What PDOIS Had To Say On The ECONOMY!!
>
>
>Bass,
>
>As HAlifa stated in his posting, the issue of the national economy is
>a matter which "requires more than common sense economics.... It
requires
>intellectual honesty on the part of decision makers and their
>fidelity to propositions that are fully grounded on irrefutable
>premises." I would like to add that this issue is a matter of life
>and death. If we choose to solve it creatively we can guarantee
ourselves
>and
>our children a meaningful life under the earth, if we choose to be
>otherwise we will remain the scum of the earth (please excuse my
>language)
>
>Bass heed those words for they are very crucial especially to us the
>"cream of Africa". We the educated ones cannot allow ourselves to
>indulde in intellectual dishonesty for the hopes of our people are on
>our shoulders.
>
>Bass PDOIS had stated earlier, well before Jammeh's days in its
>manifesto what its stand on the private sector is and this is exactly
>what Halifa reflected on the posting. PDOIS says come private
>investment well and good but we should not fold our hands and wait
>for it. Now if you go about calling PDOIS a" socialist or
>Semi-Socialist party and that as a result the economic strategy it is
>now putting forward and confidently portraying as the only cure for
>the economic ailment of our nation are a direct product of Marxian
>Econnomic analysis which is by default hostile to market forces" it
>makes me really wonder on two counts:
>First, I wonder whether you have made any efforts to know what PDOIS'
>economic policy is.
>Secondly, I wonder what you were really up to when all of a sudden
>the cold war jargon downs on you from God knows where. It's awkward
>because in Halifa's analysis neither Socialism nor Marxism was
>mentioned.
>
>As I hate to speculate, I'll leave it to you to answer or not answer
>as you like. One thing is certain though. In your contribution you
>haven't provided any alternative. To say that the way should be paved
>for private investors is so cheap that I would not like to believe
>this is all you have to offer the Gambian people.
>
>Finally, let us be alerrt to the fact that the development of the
>Gambia entails more than enriching a few educated Gambians. Our people
>Bass, the vast majority of the Gambian people are living in
>deplorable conditions. Therefore any policy which attempts to
>sideline them cannot be a meaningful one. Perhaps it is time Bass for
>you, me and our likes, the educated Gambians to realise that ALL the
>Gambian people want to have a better life. I am sure if you were not
>lucky to be educated you would heve been talking differently today.
>If you were a farmer earning ONLY one thousand Dalasis or two PER
>ANNUM you would not be telling us that theMONTHLY salaries of members
of
>perliament
>SEVEN THOUSAND Dalasis is meagre. If you were an unlucky farmer, you
>would not have been saying that the resources of the country should
>be given to a few Gambians to enjoy.
>
>Finally, I would like to add that one does not have to study economics
>to understand certain very basic things. Of course a person who
>studies economics is more likely to be exposed to economic issue. I
>would like to conted here and now though that he who makes it a
>priority can also become conversat with economic issues without
>holding a degree in it. Remember that Malcolm X, one of the most
>influencial African Americans, did not posses any
>degree in any of the issues he was very eloquent in. Knowlwdge
>belongs only to those who sought it, so it is nonesense to think that
>only economic graduates can talk about economic issues.
>
>much respect
>
>Alpha
>
>
>


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 13:21:23 EST
From: BobbySil@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: suggestion
Message-ID: <5b096695.34d36ba7@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 98-01-31 09:35:47 EST, you write:

<< If i am not mistaking,this
bantaba is for gambians and pro-gambians to come forward with their
opinions concerning ways to purvey our MOTHER LAND (THE GAMBIA).If
that is the case, why can't we respect each other's opinion? It's very
annoying seeing intellectual people with great idea,sharing the same
common goal, insulting eother ach or taking matters personally.The Gambia
at this present moment doesn't need that, but the act of procuring
provisions to brighten or polish Her up again. >>


Edi, I am sorry but the bantaba is not for Gambians alone, if you look at the
nature of this membership you will agree with me. The bantaba is mend for the
discussion on the Gambia and related issues; therefore, any issue can be
discussed so long as it can be related to the Gambia. Also, keep in mind that
you can be a Gambian, and be Anti-Gambian (just a thought).

I do agree with you that, negativity is not needed presently or at anytime for
the health of the Gambia.

Good Day
B. Sillah

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 02 Feb 1998 05:18:47 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal (fwd)
Message-ID: <34D59D87.6C87@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Ancha Bala-Gaye u wrote:
>
> With the hope that I didn't misunderstand anything you said, these are my
> comments. If I did misunderstand, I appologise in advance.
>
> Habib wrote:
>
> >Yes
> >No woman in her correct mind would go about saying she had sex with this
> >and that especially other people's husbands publicly.
>
> I'm sorry, I don't see why not. This is not Saudi Arabia where a woman
> would not dare tell she slept with someone. It's a "free" country and you
> may say whatever you like. Unless of course, you and your partner decided
> to keep it quiet.
>
> >I think that is a viscous and distructive thing to do to anyone's
> >marriage.
>
> If the rumour is true, then I think the married party should have thought
> about commiting adultery before engaging in the activity.
>
> >If she had a relationship with a married man which is her
> >private affair, it should remain private . Period.
>
> Actually, it's the married man's private affair too. And I don't think
> that he should be able to have his cake and eat it too (in this case, be
> married AND be able to have an extramarital affair without being found
> out). She has nothing to lose really, (except her reputation....if she
> cares about it!), but he may lose his family........unless of
> course, he doesn't think they're worth his devotion and love.
>
> >Linda Tripp seems to have a dubious agenda with bad intentions
> obviously.
> >She also may be looking for ransome money.
> Habib
>
> This is possible.
> Ancha.
Ancha
You definately misunderstood what I meant.
It is disgraceful for a man or woman to go public talking about who they
slept wether it is Saudi Arabia , Gambia or USA.
No one forced these women to sleep with the President or anyone so they
should keep their dirty linen to themselves.
I am pretty sure Clinton did not force these fame and bounty hunters to
have sexual relations with him.
Yes he is wrong to approach a girl thirty years younger even if she
pushed herself on him. BUT I think she should keep it private.
The only reason is to get some attention and instant fame for a possible
book or film show.
Morally it is not right for both parties but it is not illegal act so
convict him only --This is what I meant in a nutshell

Hope this will clarify the message and not attacking the messenger
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 02 Feb 1998 05:53:21 -0500
From: Habib Ghanim <hghanim@erols.com>
To: amadou@mail.lig.bellsouth.net
Cc: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Scandal (fwd)
Message-ID: <34D5A5A1.2B3C@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

A. Scattred Janneh wrote:
>
> Ancha Bala-Gaye u wrote:
> >
> > I'm sorry, I don't see why not. This is not Saudi Arabia where a woman
> > would not dare tell she slept with someone. It's a "free" country and you
> > may say whatever you like.
>
> What's "free" in this country? It's "buy one get one free," "free if
> you spend so much," "free if you take these strings too," etc.
>
> Well, kidding aside, even the USA's "freedom" comes with some legal,
> social and moral restraints. Examples: you may not utter statements that
> are likely to provoke a violent reaction ("fighting words"). You are
> also not "free" to yell "fire" in a crowded movie theater.
>
> And what's the relevance of Saudi Arabia to your response?
>
> Other than those matters, I tend to agree with your overall premise.
>
> Amadou SJ

Agreed
Why Saudi Arabia ??
They do not commit adultry instead they legally marry the woman involved
so that if a child is concived in the relationship that child will be
able to inherit from the father's assets after his death.
( this protects the children)
--
Habib Diab Ghanim

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 18:47:28 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Scandal (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9801311826.A4194-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

;
Subject: Re: Scandal (fwd)

Ancha Bala-Gaye u wrote:
>
> With the hope that I didn't misunderstand anything you said, these are my
> comments. If I did misunderstand, I appologise in advance.
>
> Habib wrote:
>
> >Yes
> >No woman in her correct mind would go about saying she had sex with this
> >and that especially other people's husbands publicly.
>
> I'm sorry, I don't see why not. This is not Saudi Arabia where a woman
> would not dare tell she slept with someone. It's a "free" country and you
> may say whatever you like. Unless of course, you and your partner decided
> to keep it quiet.


The reason for using this comparison (Saudi and the US) is because Habib,
made a
generalisation when he said "No woman in her correct mind would go around
saying she had sex with this and that ......".
Since sleeping with a married person doesn't seem to be a big deal in
the US, then why
should telling others be? Whereas in Saudi, a woman couldn't or wouldn't do
this, since the Sharia law holds and one is delt with accordingly.
The use of Saudi isn't a big deal at all, it was the country that came to
mind when I was writing the message.


>Ancha
>You definately misunderstood what I meant.
>It is disgraceful for a man or woman to go public talking about who they
>slept wether it is Saudi Arabia , Gambia or USA.
>No one forced these women to sleep with the President or anyone so they
>should keep their dirty linen to themselves.
>I am pretty sure Clinton did not force these fame and bounty hunters to
>have sexual relations with him.
>Yes he is wrong to approach a girl thirty years younger even if she
>pushed herself on him. BUT I think she should keep it private.

As I said in my earlier message, I'm sorry for misunderstanding.
Actually, in my opinion, IF!! he was stupid enough to commit adultery,
esp. in a country where sueing others (for whatever reason one can come
up with) has now become a
pass time, and publically humiliating others isn't given a second thought,
then it serves him right.
Ancha.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 16:09:13 -0800
From: Lamin Jaiteh <ljaiteh@mail.wsu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Resp.
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19980131160913.007b8a70@mail.wsu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi,
Well Bass I really do not understand what u meant by the statement "But we
cannot also forget the fact that unless
we provide our leadership with a respectable standard of living,they would
end up doing to us what they have always done since
independence,namely,emptying the national coffers and use it for themselves
and their immediate families".
I guess my question is that, is it our responsibiliy to make our leaders
rich and comfortable first irrespective of how thet came to power before
they govern us the right way.If so that is IS VERY SAD INDEED.
Please could u explain concisely what u meant by the above!
Thanks


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 1 Feb 1998 03:47:00 +0300
From: "Bassirou Dodou Drammeh" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Resp.
Message-ID: <01bd2eaa$e80b13c0$3d2385c2@q-tel.qatar.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr.Jaiteh!
A respectable standard of living does not at all mean that
you would become RICH! It simply means that you would be given a salary that
would be able to feed you and your family and also allow you and them to
enjoy a certain degree of luxury without having to steal anything from the
national treasury.No,its not our responsibility to make make our leaders
rich,but yes,its our responsibility to make them financially comfortable,so
that they would have the desire to work for us and more importantly,be in a
position where they can resist the temptation of stealing the very thing
they are supposed to protect.We have to understand and accept the fact that
not all our politicians can be as decent,modest ,sincere and dedicated as
Sedia and Halifa.Most of the rest of them are just ordinary Gambians like
you and me.

Regards Bassss!
-----Original Message-----
From: Lamin Jaiteh <ljaiteh@mail.wsu.edu>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Date: Sunday, February 01, 1998 8:58 AM
Subject: Resp.


>Hi,
>Well Bass I really do not understand what u meant by the statement "But we
>cannot also forget the fact that unless
>we provide our leadership with a respectable standard of living,they would
>end up doing to us what they have always done since
>independence,namely,emptying the national coffers and use it for themselves
>and their immediate families".
>I guess my question is that, is it our responsibiliy to make our leaders
>rich and comfortable first irrespective of how thet came to power before
>they govern us the right way.If so that is IS VERY SAD INDEED.
>Please could u explain concisely what u meant by the above!
>Thanks
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 21:49:48 EST
From: BobbySil@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Resp.
Message-ID: <7d20d456.34d3e2cf@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 98-01-31 19:04:12 EST, you write:

<< Well Bass I really do not understand what u meant by the statement "But we
cannot also forget the fact that unless
we provide our leadership with a respectable standard of living,they would
end up doing to us what they have always done since
independence,namely,emptying the national coffers and use it for themselves
and their immediate families". >>

Lamin,
I guess you are not alone, I was also baffled by that statement. I did not
really understand what Bass meant. May be we should give him an opportunity to
clarify himself.

If that is the only reason to provide a respectable standard of living for our
leadership, then they don't need to be in politics or we are stupid enough to
keep voting them into office.

Bass, with all due respect brother...please come clean!

Love you!
Baboucarr Sillah

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 21:54:13 EST
From: BobbySil@aol.com
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Scandal
Message-ID: <d65f2d51.34d3e3d7@aol.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: multipart/mixed;
boundary="part0_886301653_boundary"

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

--part0_886301653_boundary
Content-ID: <0_886301653@inet_out.mail.aol.com.1>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Salam
Baboucarr Sillah

--part0_886301653_boundary
Content-ID: <0_886301653@inet_out.mail.aol.com.2>
Content-type: text/plain;
name="GHANIM"
Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable
Content-disposition: inline

<HTML><PRE>In a message dated 98-01-31 17:56:18 EST, you write:

<< Agreed
Why Saudi Arabia ??
They do not commit adultry instead they legally marry the woman involved
so that if a child is concived in the relationship that child will be
able to inherit from the father's assets after his death.
( this protects the children)
--
Habib Diab Ghanim
<FONT COLOR=3D"#0f0f0f" BACK=3D"#fffffe" SIZE=3D3>
</FONT></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" BACK=3D"#FFFFFF" SIZE=3D3> >>
Habib,
Please don't say "they do not commit adultry" in Saudi Arabia. You cannot=
prove that, Mr. Ghanim.Yes, it is against their laws (the Shariah) to co=
mmit adultry and that does not mean it doesn't take place. Would you agre=
e with me, that the law is in place, inorder to deter people from commit=
ting adultery; besides being against the Islamic rule? It is happening an=
d has happened that is why it is still a law in Saudi. Even if there was =
a zero tolerence, it would still be a law.

Anyway, so much for this adultry subject! I hope we all stay away from th=
is mess. May I should have never brought up this presidential infidelity,=
it took a different angle of discussion. Sorry.

Salam
Baboucarr Sillah</PRE></HTML>


--part0_886301653_boundary--

------------------------------

End of GAMBIA-L Digest 105
**************************
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
| More
Jump To:
Bantaba in Cyberspace © 2005-2021 Nijii Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 3.43 seconds. User Policy, Privacy & Disclaimer | Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.06