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Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

Posted - 10 Sep 2021 :  16:04:03  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Topics covered in this issue include:

1) Re: The case of Babanding Fatty - Compensation after seven years
by "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
2) Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
by "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
3) Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
by "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
4) University Of The Gambia
by SANG1220 <SANG1220@aol.com>
5) Re: Is It Our Nature? The Crab Ph.D Syndrome
by f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
6) Introduction
by f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
7) Re: introduction
by ADEMBA <ADEMBA@aol.com>
8) Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
by ADEMBA <ADEMBA@aol.com>
9) Re: SV: Is It In Our Nature? (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
10) Dual Citizenship
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
11) Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
12) Re: SV: Is It In Our Nature? (fwd)
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
13) Is it in our nature?
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
14) Re: Is It In Our Nature? The Crab or PHD Syndrome
by "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
15) Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
by Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
16) Re: University Of The Gambia
by Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
17) Unsubscribe
by "B.M.Jones" <B.M.Jones@econ.hull.ac.uk>
18) RE: SOCCER/FOOTBALL
by Olafiaklinikken Olafia <olafia@online.no>
19) Re: Babading Sissoho
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
20) Re: Gambia Educational Support Plan -final call for comments
by Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
21) Re: Is it in our nature?
by BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
22) Re: Forwarded posting from Dr Sulayman Nyang
by Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
23) Re: Forwarded posting from Dr Sulayman Nyang
by Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
24) SV: Babading Sissoho
by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
25) Senegal
by Mamadi Corra <MKCORRA@VM.SC.EDU>
26) RE: Is it in our nature?
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
27) Re: Is It Our Nature? re: Democratic change
by "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
28) New Member
by Raye Sosseh <gt8065b@prism.gatech.edu>
29) New member
by "A. Loum" <tloum@u.washington.edu>
30) Need info
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
31) Re: Need info
by Anna Secka <secka@cse.bridgeport.edu>
32) Re: Need info
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
33) RE: Is it in our nature? (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
34) Re: forwarded posting from Dr. Nyang
by Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
35) Re: Need info
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
36) Re: Is it in our nature?
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
37) Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
38) RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
39) Re: Senegal
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
40) Re. Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
41) RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
42) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by Bala S Jallow <bala@algonet.se>
43) Re: introduction
by Saikou B M Njai <sbn13@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>
44) RE: Is it in our nature? (fwd) -Reply
by Ndey Drammeh <NDRAMME@wpo.it.luc.edu>
45) Re: Is it in our nature?
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
46) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
47) RE: Is it in our nature?
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
48) RE: Is it in our nature? (fwd)
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
49) Wife Beating
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
50) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
51) New Member
by momodou@inform-bbs.dk (Momodou Camara)
52) Introduction
by "janko.fofana@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
53) Re: introduction
by "janko.fofana@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
54) SV: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
55) Re: please remove
by rdinvest@highway1.com
56) Re: Introduction
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
57) RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
58) A CHRISTMAS POEM
by Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
59) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
60) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
61) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by habib <hghanim@erols.com>
62) Re: Introduction
by BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
63) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
64) Re: introduction
by "RASTAFARI IS HIS NAME...JAH..GIVE THANKS & PRAISES" <ABARROW@rr5.rr.intel.com>
65) Christmas Eve Jam
by MJawara <MJawara@aol.com>
66) unlist
by "Babou Njie" <babounjie@hotmail.com>
67) Gambia Educational Support Plan-final call for comments
by "Housainou Taal"<Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
68) Unsubscribe
by "RASTAFARI IS HIS NAME...JAH..GIVE THANKS & PRAISES" <ABARROW@rr5.rr.intel.com>
69) Re:christmas Holidays
by Fatou Khan <mec97a14@tron.lyngbyes.dk>
70) Re: Racial Discriminatiion (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
71) The Intellectual Prostitutes (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
72) Poem: The Cold Within
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
73) FW: story for the day
by Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
74) Re: Gambia Educational Support Plan-final call for comments
by "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
75) Wow moe.... (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
76) Re:christmas Holidays
by Bennie Robinson <BROBINSON@gwmail.kysu.edu>
77) Tribute to Kekoto Maane
by "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
78) Re: Wow moe.... (fwd)
by M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
79) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by BobbySil <BobbySil@aol.com>
80) The Nigeria I hate (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
81) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
82) humor: Ever been a waiter or waited on?
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
83) Question...
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
84) Help needed!
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
85) Re: Tribute to Kekoto Maane
by Abdou O Gibba <Abdou.Gibba@smr.uib.no>
86) Re: Help needed!
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
87) SV: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
88) SV: Help needed!
by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
89) Re: Help needed!
by momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
90) Request
by f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
91) Re: SV: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
92) Re: The Nigeria I hate (fwd)
by "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
93) Re: Help needed!
by M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
94) unlist
by "L.A.E. WRIGHT" <eco7laew@lucs-02.novell.leeds.ac.uk>
95) Re: NINETEEN STUDENTS FROM BANJUL ACADEMY STILL DON'T HAVE THEIR
by CAMARA BAKEBBA <cb714@greenwich.ac.uk>
96) Re: unlist
by Bennie Robinson <BROBINSON@gwmail.kysu.edu>
97) Re: Question...
by nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
98) RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
99)
by "Sikkaaka" <ley5mc1@nottingham.ac.uk>
100) Re: NINETEEN STUDENTS FROM BANJUL ACADEMY STILL DON'T HAVE THEIR
by nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
101) Farafenni Hospital
by "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
102) THE ONLY SOLUTION!
by "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
103) Re: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
by Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
104) Suspending Gambia-L subscriptions
by "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
105) Unlist
by "Ousainou Demba - EECS (EE214)" <odemba@eecs.wsu.edu>
106) Re: Help needed!
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
107) Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
108) Interfaith Relations in Our Own Back Yard (fwd)
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
109) Re: NINETEEN STUDENTS FROM BANJUL ACADEMY STILL DON'T HAVE THEIR
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
110) Re: Question...
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
111) Re: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
112) AMISTAD
by mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
113) Re: SV: Babading Sissoho
by mmjeng@image.dk
114) Banjulians Discover "Oil Wells" At Half Die
by mmjeng@image.dk
115) Re: Question...
by nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
116) Re: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
by Saikou B M Njai <sbn13@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 13:52:25 +0300
From: "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: The case of Babanding Fatty - Compensation after seven years
Message-ID: <199712141646.NAA05004@qatar.net.qa>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr.Camara!
Thanks for the run down and keep up the good work down there!

Regards Basss!

----------
> From: Camara, Momodou <momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk>Momodou Camara

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 03:07:25 +0330
From: "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
Message-ID: <19971214165243.AAA24549@kansala.avana.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

First of all Baboucar did you real sit down to get to the nitty gritty of
the university thing you are talking about. I have been in Canada and I've
attended meetings about this program and you would be surprised or perhaps
happy to know what it entails.
Let me break it down to you... and perhaps you'll have a grasp of it. The
Nova Scotia Gambia Association is an association headed by Mr Borris
Devaney and it comprises mostly of Gambian students based in Nova
Scotia.The assocaition originally had students from St Marys University and
Other Nova Scotian unversities sent to the Gambia during the summer months
to do some volunteer teaching. It came up after sometime of this going on
that the Gambia could actually have a UEP (university extension program).
It was proposed to the Ministry of Education and to help the Gambia they
had professors from the various universities to go to the gambia to assist
in teaching various courses including history and Mathematics. In fact I
remember in one of our meetings in Halifax, a prof who teaches in Dalhousie
University mentioned that his students in the Gambia on average did a lot
better than their counterparts in Canada. I questioned the type of History
taught and I was told that it was just the kiind you'd find in any
university...I am not too sure about this.
In conclusion the UEP will eventually become a fully established university
and hopefully all associations of other universities will dorp even though
they will be kept in mind since they helped in the mission accomplishment.
Lang Jr.


----------
> From: Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
> Date: 14 December 1997 10:01
>
> I am very disappointed to hear that our University has a copy cat to a
> university in Canada. I have a big problem with that because this is the
first
> thing that leaves us were we are at this moment. I believe that the
gambian
> education system should be administered according to our
cultural,economical
> and social settings and standards.I am tired of reading a book and fully
> understand what it means and how to apply it to my daily ways.You guys
tell me
> ?Were you not tired of learning fabricated history lessons and mark &
> jean.spill it out for the better and independence we are craving for.
>
> Yours
> Baboucar Sallah
> Lamtoro@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 20:14:57 +0300
From: "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
Message-ID: <199712142308.UAA05823@qatar.net.qa>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr.Maane,
Thanks for the clarification and keep up the good work down there!

Regards Bassss!


> In conclusion the UEP will eventually become a fully established
university
> and hopefully all associations of other universities will dorp even
though
> they will be kept in mind since they helped in the mission
accomplishment.
> Lang Jr.
>
>
> ----------
> > From: Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
> > To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> > Subject: Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
> > Date: 14 December 1997 10:01
> >
> > I am very disappointed to hear that our University has a copy cat to a
> > university in Canada. I have a big problem with that because this is
the
> first
> > thing that leaves us were we are at this moment. I believe that the
> gambian
> > education system should be administered according to our
> cultural,economical
> > and social settings and standards.I am tired of reading a book and
fully
> > understand what it means and how to apply it to my daily ways.You guys
> tell me
> > ?Were you not tired of learning fabricated history lessons and mark &
> > jean.spill it out for the better and independence we are craving for.
> >
> > Yours
> > Baboucar Sallah
> > Lamtoro@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 14:42:23 EST
From: SANG1220 <SANG1220@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Cc: SANG1220@aol.com
Subject: University Of The Gambia
Message-ID: <28bead82.349436a1@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Just a reminder about how a university begins. Mr Sallah in your zeal about
gambia university, perhaps you need to take a historical perspective into the
establishment of universities in Africa. A few examples here and there, 1st,
Foray Bay College, regarded as the oldest university in africa, began as an
extension of Durham University in Scotland(Jabou help me out here), and I
believe a lot of africans got there education from there most especially
Gambians, 2nd Njala University also began as an extension of the University of
Chicago. What am trying to say is "Patience Dog Eat Fat Bone" In time Gambia
University will come to its own and the history you talked about will be
taught correctly or incorrectly it will be up to you the student to grow and
develop from there. Remember history is always told/taught with a bias.
Thanks
Daddy Sang

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 20:25:13 +0000
From: f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Is It Our Nature? The Crab Ph.D Syndrome
Message-ID: <19971214202511.AAA24661@harrison.0.acs.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Mr. M.B. Krubally rightly wrote: "Democracy lets you vote bad government out
of office, and the bullet (military take over in most cases) just brings
humiliation and abuse of power."

These are two of the most dreadful problems that are currently affecting our
much loved country, The Gambia. I am ever so thankful to you for coming up
with these issues. I find the whole situation very devastating and the
government of the day must be held responsible for these problems. People
who do not live blameless lives should not find fault with others. I think
we all know as to which way the wing blows as far as these problems are
concern. We have to accept the fact that the abuse of people's rights is
still on the raise, and so too is tribalism. It is unfortunate and indeed
very disturbing to learned that these problems are on the raise. We have to
live and let live.

I am hoping that these problems would receive a modest and respectful
discussion in regardless to our political differences. I thank you once
again Mr. Krubally for your contribution.

Famara Giffa, Columbus, Ohio.


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 21:17:45 +0000
From: f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Introduction
Message-ID: <19971214211743.AAA26174@harrison.0.acs.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

My fellow Gambians,

Please allow me to express my sincere appreciation to the managers for
allowing me to take part in this forum. They're doing a splendid job and I
hope they all stay well and happy. There couldn't be a better and cost free
way of communicating to each other. I am so grateful of you folks please
keep it up.

This is a belate note of introduction and I apologise for the delay. I am
Famara Demba widely known as Giffa. I was born in Fanyungu (Gunjur), kombo
south district. I go to school here in Columbus, and my major is Eco-tourism.

I shall look forward to hearing from my friends and relatives across the world.
In the mean while, I wish each and every human being a peaceful and a very
happy season.

God bless!

Famara Demba, Ohio



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 16:12:38 EST
From: ADEMBA <ADEMBA@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@U.Washington.edu
Subject: Re: introduction
Message-ID: <4f02bb2a.34944bc9@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Hi Ten,
Your name seem familiar. I think you are my nephew who use to stay in
Seattle, the Katong rude boy. If that so, please you are welcome to the
Bantaba.
Seeeee Yoooooooo!
Alasana. (UNCLE).

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 16:38:56 EST
From: ADEMBA <ADEMBA@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
Message-ID: <6c3fbbb5.349451f7@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

It is very simple to figure this out. Althought, it is important to have our
own cultural setting of everything regarding to education, but as there is a
limited resource to established our own, why not accept the offered. Are you
presently going to school in a Gambian cultural setting?, I suppose it is
not. So what is the different.
Everything has it's advantages and disadvantages. Whatever it is, we have no
choice. I believe your are going throught some cultural differences, but you
can't help it. Anyway, I am out of time at the moment. Later.
Peace.
Alasana Demba.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 16:44:35 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: SV: Is It In Our Nature? (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9712141501.A25218-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

hello everyone,
i just wanted to add my few bututes to this topic. I agree that it is in
our nature to be disorganised. This is not to say that there're no
exceptions to the rule. I guess the main problem is that being
disorganised seems to be the rule rather than the exception. And it is
not just GAmbians, but black people as a whole, which I think is a pretty
bad flaw in our nature ( as Isaid earlier, there're exceptions to every
rule). Unfortunately, it has now become a stereotype, people do not
expect black events to start on time and be organised. i mean we, or
maybe I should say i, laugh about it yet it's nothing to laugh about
since it's a self defeating flaw. i think that the problem is that when
an event is being organised in a disorganised manner, and it turns out
better than expected ( ie, it was okay, not great), it becomes a
"remember when we had that organisation and it turned out good even
though it was all last minute??? see, we really don't need to
start doing things a lot earlier.............". Basically, we settle for
less instead of realising our full potential. That's all I had to say
about that topic.
Here's another topic I was thinking about and this is mainly for the
ladies on the list. Actually, it'ld be interesting to know what the guys
think too. I was just wondering if you resented being in
the kitchen cooking while the men gathered around in the living room
discussing whatever???? Or whether you liked / don't mind doing it.I
mean, I think it'ld be interesting to discuss the situation. And for the
guys, are there any out there that would not mind being in the kitchen
instead???
Or is the problem more about being teased by your buddied that you were in
the
kitchen instead of your wife type thing??? i once discussed the idea with
a friend and they couldn't fanthom a role switch once in a while.
Just wondering.
Ancha (just finished exams and can finally breath and talk!)

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 20:12:46 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Dual Citizenship
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971214201246.0068a508@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi! Guys,
The old Gambian constitution did not allow dual citizenship. Can anyone
tell me if the new one allows it? Someone told me a few hours ago, that it
is now allowed for a Gambian to hold citizenship of another country withou
loosing his/her Gambian one. Thank you very much. Happy
holidays!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Paul Gibba.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 20:31:54 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971214203154.0068b830@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Mr. Sallah,
Although the cultural setting with regard to the courses taught at the
university level is very important, what is equally important is the
contents of those courses and how they are taught. Not all history books
or professors for that matter, are like the past. At least I have that
little experience as a graduate student of African History at the
University of Toronto (Canada). Let us give the Gambia University a chance
and see what the future holds for it and for us all. Have a merry X-mas
and a happy new year in advance.
Paul Gibba (Toronto).




At 04:38 PM 12/14/97 EST, you wrote:
>It is very simple to figure this out. Althought, it is important to have our
>own cultural setting of everything regarding to education, but as there is a
>limited resource to established our own, why not accept the offered. Are
you
>presently going to school in a Gambian cultural setting?, I suppose it is
>not. So what is the different.
>Everything has it's advantages and disadvantages. Whatever it is, we have no
>choice. I believe your are going throught some cultural differences, but you
>can't help it. Anyway, I am out of time at the moment. Later.
>Peace.
>Alasana Demba.
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 21:35:35 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SV: Is It In Our Nature? (fwd)
Message-ID: <199712150235.VAA09595@oak.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

Anch you wrote:

> Here's another topic I was thinking about and this is mainly for the
> ladies on the list. Actually, it'ld be interesting to know what the guys
> think too. I was just wondering if you resented being in
> the kitchen cooking while the men gathered around in the living room
> discussing whatever???? Or whether you liked / don't mind doing it.I
> mean, I think it'ld be interesting to discuss the situation. And for the
> guys, are there any out there that would not mind being in the kitchen
> instead???
> Or is the problem more about being teased by your buddied that you were in
> the
> kitchen instead of your wife type thing??? i once discussed the idea with
> a friend and they couldn't fanthom a role switch once in a while.
> Just wondering.
> Ancha (just finished exams and can finally breath and talk!)
>
Believe me Ancha I find cooking really therapeutic especially after a long day
in the office. However, I would want to imagine how it would be like for a
young warrior (a Ked'do) after a long days battle. After all that might be
what made us so unkind to those who work in the kitchen.


Malanding jaiteh


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 14 Dec 1997 22:57:10 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.Washington.edu
Subject: Is it in our nature?
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971214225710.00689f70@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Ancha,
The issue of guys cooking is very interesting and I am glad that you
raised it. In fact, I have been an advocate for guys to do just that for
many years in both Canadian cities of Montreal and Toronto. What prompted
me to take that cause was the simple fact that many guys cooked for
themselves while they were single. In fact, many cooked for their Canadian
or West-Indian girlfriends but refused to do so for their Gambian wives as
soon as those women arrived in Canada. I am not arguing that it is wrong to
cook for one's girlfriend. However, if one's non-Gambian wife/girlfriend
is good enough to stay away from the kitchen, I bet the Gambian sister is
equally good enough for the same treatment. These guys don't know what
they are missing by exchanging the television remote control or the
computer keyboard for the apron for at least a few hours. As Mr. Jaiter
noted, cooking is therapeutic and I must add that it is fun.
As for me, I used to cook for myself when I was single and I still do even
though I am married to a loving wife. However, I must admit that it was
not easy convincing her that I could cook and that it was o.k. for me to
cook while she enjoys her favourite television shows. This did not sit
well among many Gambian Torontonians who saw me as adeviating from the
"TRADITION". Anyway, I enjoy doing it and I believe that it is the right
thing to do in this day and age.
Merry X-mas to you all.
Paul Gibba.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 00:00:26 -0000
From: "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Is It In Our Nature? The Crab or PHD Syndrome
Message-ID: <B0000024427@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Pa Musa Jallow" <pmj@commit.gm>
via Commit


MBK,
Point taken but I used that july '94 coup and the events (socially) that
occurred as I was and have been home all through, so I am in no way
supporting military coups or otherwise; but spoke of the realization across
the board of a need of change; I have just returned from a 48hr trip to
Senegal and in my opinion, the fact that the ruling elite or governing
class or nomenklatura (there) are mostly 60-70 yr olds or 50-60 yr olds
with the same mentality, lack of energy or what I call "the just happy to
be there"or "do nothins" is a big problem; and unless a form of civil
change occurs, some other form will occur, I tend to take a big picture
view of our evolution into modern statehood..and I will also add that
Change can be good or bad; but cahnge is ineveitable...but I appreciate
your comments
pmj

----------
> From: Mbk007 <Mbk007@aol.com>
>


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 00:50:42 EST
From: Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambian education a draw back in the 21st century
Message-ID: <31cea73c.3494c535@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Hello Lang,

This is exactly what I had in mind when I posted my comments.No matter how
much someone is helping you never relinguish your workload to them. I am very
please to have them helping but plans should be carefully sorted by gambians
themselves.Its just like welfare in America unless you help a person help him
or her self you are just waisting their time.Unless we take the
responsibility ourselves things will never be the way it should be.why do you
think other nations are so patriotic? is not because they were helped by
others but because they had it set to their needs not what someone else think.
who knows your home more than you do,we must come together as one in this
issue for a better Gambia.Its our future and we should play with it let alone
someone else.We will take all the support we could get but we must take
responsibility not to repeat history again.our education failed us once lets
not let it happen again.

PS:Please post your insights and let know how you feel about this issue so we
can come up with ways to tackle it before its too late.

Thankyou

yours
Baboucar sallah
Lamtoro@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 01:36:14 EST
From: Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu, Msonko@Hotmail.com
Subject: Re: University Of The Gambia
Message-ID: <e2124348.3494cfe0@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

hello everyone,

I am just very concerned with what the future will hold for people that may
not grow from it.Like the rest of our school system,programs were hardly
revised nor where current material availed to us in those days . it always
comes to me when ever I sign up for a new class every semester.I just want to
see a better Gambia not a moulding one.You are right about those colleges but
it seems to me that the trend is still the same.I may not have the answers to
with but its always good let out what and how you feel about things especially
when it comes to your own country.I think that we can be a better country if
we can add our own with someone elses than just relying on one side.
talk to you guys soon

Baboucarr




------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 13:44:46 +0000 (GMT)
From: "B.M.Jones" <B.M.Jones@econ.hull.ac.uk>
To: bantaba <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Unsubscribe
Message-ID: <SIMEON.9712151346.A@p041.gri.hull.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII

To List Managers,

Kindly delist me temporarily as I will be away for
christmas. May I take this opportunity to wish all
list members a happy christmas and a prosperous and
fruitful new year.

Cheers
basil

----------------------
B.M.Jones
B.M.Jones@econ.hull.ac.uk


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 16:04:41 +0100 (MET)
From: Olafiaklinikken Olafia <olafia@online.no>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: SOCCER/FOOTBALL
Message-ID: <199712151504.QAA13264@online.no>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Uncle Tony,

Thanks for a brief and concise history about soccer between the Gambia and
Senegal. The last time the Gambia won over Senengal was in 1961. That time
my father an ex. football player was the Trainer/Manager. The team that won
over Senegal was consisting of players like Musa Jobarteh, Salifu Ndure,
George Gomez, Late deputy Commander of Police Saul Samba, the Taal brothers
Maam Bara and Amadou who was the goalkeeper and many more i Couldn=B4t
remember their names, my brother ex. goalkeeper Saho who is residing in
Sweden was around could have help me with more details but he is now
currently in the Gambia in relation to the ZONE II combined with holidays.


There were so many teams my father manged in the Gambia eg. like Gambia
United which was consiting of players like Dawda Corr, Ousman Njai "TARU"
goalkeeper photographer at Allen Street, Alieu Fall, Eliman or Cherno Bah of
the defunct Commercial Bank. From what i was told and written in the
Senegambia son by Pap saine in 1982 was that my father, Shyben A. Madi and
Pa Prom were the most enthiuast in promoting football in tghe Gambia. The
Gold cup which is Sahos cup is in the memory of my dad the late Alh. O.K.
Saho. Which the first winners were REal De Banjul.

Daddy Sang BTW Sheriff Sulayemane was a Guinean and not a Senegalese. He
was playing in the Guinean National team HAFIA along with stars like Maxime
Camara, Papa Cammara; Petit Sori and Soleir.


Uncle I am hereby wishing you and your family a a very merry and cheerful
X_mas and a prosperous happy new year


Yours Nephew=20

Omar S. Saho




------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 12:47:49 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Babading Sissoho
Message-ID: <34956D45.2BF3@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> Habib, you wrote:
>
> > Today while talking to a friend of mine in the Gambia,I was told that Mr
> > Sissoho ,the Malian-Gambian millionaire had a very large and warm
> > welcome in Banjul with jubilations everywhere. He promised to help The
> > Gambia a lot of money in the improvements of the Airport and related
> > projects. This is good news for the Gambian business community and
> > confidence building of the country. I hope he will keep his promise .
> > The more the investment money, the better for us.
> > He also gave the soccer teams of Gambia and Mali much needed financial
> > help.
> >
> > Habib Ghanim
>
> This Sissoho guy seems pretty amusing. I mean, not only is he a
> millionaire (in US dollars), he is also a humanist as shown by his actions
> (as in the Florida donation). I even remember reading articles about his
> influence on some US senators who were amazed as to how he amassed his
> fortune. Man, he must be rich if he can impress the US that much by
> throwing dollars around as if it were nobody's business. If he is a true
> businessman, I wonder if he tried to convince Bill Gates that business in
> Africa is not too bad :-))). But who really is this man, and what is his
> connection with the Gambia (or should I say President Jammeh?)? How did he
> become qualified to be a dual citizen of both Gambia and Mali? Better yet,
> how did he obtain diplomatic status for the representation of the Gambia?
>
> I would really like to read millionaire Sissoho's biographical information
> if it is obtainable. Certainly, any millionaire would have some
> information written about him or her. Does anyone have such information
> on Mr. Sossoho they wish to share?
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
> =========================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> PS
> Brother Habib, please update me on the "Let's do it" project.

Moe
There was a meeting this past saturday at Fatou Sayang's building on 16
th street. I will let her give us the details because I had to leave
early for a founder's dinner at the Muslim Community Center. Basically
discussions and dialogue has started and I think it WILL happen.
Habib
Ps regarding SISSOHO
I think your questions are valid and as Gambians we need to find out
who is this roaming Ambassador of ours.
we hear many rumors but no facts so maybe it is time to cast aside
doubts and work for the interest of the Gambia by getting some of his
money invested home in schools, communications and roads.
hdg
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 17:47:45 -0600
From: Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambia Educational Support Plan -final call for comments
Message-ID: <1.5.4.16.19971215172516.48e7b538@etbu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Mr Malanding Jaiteh and the rest of the Education committee,
Thanks a lot for your invaluable efforts towards drafting the first
protocol on Gambian education for Gambia-l. Your time and dedication is very
much appreciated. To that effect, i would like to make a few suggestions as
requested by the committee from all members of Gambia-l.
First, at the middle/high school level, i think we should require a
mandatory inclusion of Gambian history, Gambian geography, and
Civics/government into the school curriculum for any school that is to
receive assistance. I think the schools should be given a grace period of
one academic year to select the appropriate textbooks and find instructor(s)
for the above classes. If after that period any school fails to meet these
prerequisites, then we should make it clear that all assistance will be
terminated at that point. The reasons for my suggestion are obvious. As
discussed on this list a while back, these courses are not taught at the
high school level. Their inclusion would bring about:
1. a better awareness of Gambian history, 2. a generation of Gambian
geographers whose understanding of the Gambian topology can aid them in
improving agricultural productivity, and last but not least, 3. a
generation of Gambians whose mastery of their civil rights and whose
understanding of the mechanism of the operations of govt will improve the
overall political awareness of the Gambian youth.
Secondly, i do not believe that we can carry this project to
maturity without the involvement of the govt or some other establishment
resident in The Gambia. Even if this believe of mine is not true, then i
still think that we should raise the annual contributions of members as
follows:
Undergraduate Student ---- $20, Graduate Students ---- $30, and
Non-Students ---- $50. We have embarked on a very ambitious project, and
that can only be accompanied by our utmost generosity in order to fulfil our
commitments to this project. From some estimates that i have done, we can
create a few jobs in The Gambia alongside implementing our project. This is
how it would work. Instead of giving any computers to high schools, i think
we should rent an office in either of Serekunda or Banjul (places with a
reliable supply of electricity), install the computers originally intended
for the high schools at these offices, and then hire two or three people to
teach computer classes at these locations. The money thus generated can then
be redistributed to the chosen schools. This process will have the double
effect of creating employment (a few jobs) in The Gambia, as well as
satisfying the original needs of the recipient schools.
You may ask how do we pay for the office as well as the salaries of
these instructors. This is why i said earlier that we need govt involvement.
We can ask the education department, one of the NGOs, or any philanthropic
business to provide us with an office as well as the accompanying electric
bills. As for paying the instructors, i recommend a D500/month salary to
each part-time instructor working 3 hours a day for 6 days a week. That will
keep the office open for 9 hours a day. The total cost will be $150/month or
$1800/year for all 3 instructors combined (assuming $1 = D10 ). I personally
think that this is a feasible goal.
The key to my second suggestion is that we have to be conservative
in the first year of our operation. We need to just target the Gambia
college and the National library the first year. That way we can provide
everything that the Education Committee has projected for these two
institutions. From the fundraisers and the member contributions for the
second year of operation, we can open up the office and hire the instructors
that i talked about. By then our services to The Gambia college and the
National library would have caught national attention (either through radio
or TV advertisements) and that would improve our chances of convincing the
govt, the NGOs, or local businesses to donate the needed office/utilities
during our second year of operation.
( P.S. I think i can convince a few Gambians in the Dallas/Texas
area who may not even be members of Gambia-l to contribute to our cause. I
therefore challenge every member to discuss what we are trying to do with
other Gambians who may not be wired to the internet. If every member can
convince atleast one non-member to contribute an annual fee, imagine how
much more we can do the first year alone. )
Thanx all for your time. Peace!!!!!!

It's Tamsir.


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 21:03:13 EST
From: BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Is it in our nature?
Message-ID: <c6356cc5.3495e163@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Mr. Gibba:

I was on the verge of adding my 2 cents to the topic at hand, when I stumbled
onto your posting..... You said it all for me!!.

And for those "brothers" who think you are deviating from the norm, tell them
they are insecure. The preacher and islamic scholar encourages men to honor
their wives (even though "TRADITION" reversed that role).

Guys like you and my brother (Malanding Jaiteh) will have relationships that
last simply because you cherish, honor, and respect your wonderful wives.

Thank you very much brothers, and I salute you for not letting those insecure
"brothers" intimidate you - keep it up!!!

Awa Sey



------------------------------

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 21:39:34 -0600
From: Tamsir Mbai <mba4224@etbu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Forwarded posting from Dr Sulayman Nyang
Message-ID: <1.5.4.16.19971215211706.0faf7112@etbu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Gambia-l,
By the time you finish reading through this article, you would have
been driven to one of two extreme poles. You either find yourself at the
pole where the inhabitants claim that this article is nothing more than a
publicity stunt from an ignorant author in an attempt to challenge the
authority of a well respected scholar, or you may find yourself at the other
pole whose inhabitants give the author the benefit of the doubt and each say
to him/herself that "i think the author has a point and maybe everyone
should just ponder his/her position a little bit more." Whatever pole you
are driven to does not bother me at all, but i would appreciate it if you
were driven to the latter pole.
I have fought very hard with my inner self not to respond to the
original article, but i lost the battle over the weekend when my conscience
convinced me that i should say how i feel about it. I start by saying that i
have heard a lot about Dr Sulayman Nyang, starting from when i was in The
Gambia six years ago. I must also add that of all the things i have heard
about the respected doctor, everything was positive, complimentary,
encouraging, and very uplifting. Consequently, i do not wish to undermine or
tarnish in any way that well-established reputation. However, i beg to
differ with one point of his analysis of the transatlantic Slave trade. I
would not have responded had that point been made on a subliminal level. In
my opinion, the fact that the point was cited in an equation that attempted
to equally ration the responsibility of the slave trade between Africans and
people of European descent shows that it bears utmost importance in the
doctor's analysis. If that is not the case, then at least that point is
still the most radical. Correct me if i am wrong, Dr Nyang.
When i first started college, i had an opportunity in 1993 to defend
this position that i am about to address, and i must say that my position
hasn't changed during that four year span. That is precisely the reason why
i was shocked when i read Dr Nyang's article in which he wrote:
"The kind of slavery American historians call "the peculiar
institution" in American history was unknown in pre-colonial Africa.
However, I should hasten to add that Africans became partners in the traffic
in human cargo soon after the concept of comodified slavery was introduced.
Without African players there could not have developed this massive
transplantation of millions from the continent to the Americas.This is why
American whites, Europeans and continental
Africans owe an apology to all blacks and persons of mixed parentage in
the Americas."
I am not a history student nor am i a historian, but my reading on
issues pertaining to Africa and the Western world has brought me to the sad
conclusion that when it comes to these issues, the African MUST view the
western opinion with some level of cynicism. (To the benevolent friends of
gambia-l who are of European descent, excuse my flagrant generalization. My
people and me have experienced a painful history, and i cannot but reminisce
on what could have been. I don't think you will agree, but i hope you
understand.)
Throughout history and in every war, the victor's point of view has
been the medium through which the accounts of the battles and the war are
narrated to the rest of the world. The losers are simply relegated as mere
observers and sometimes they are even made to have been guilty of causing
the war or of deserving the fate that befell them. The Atlantic slave trade
is NO EXCEPTION to this tacit international law. Here we have to note that
most accounts of the slave trade have been presented by mainly white
observers/historians from Europe or the Americas. Because of the horrendous
nature of crimes committed against Africans during and after the slave
trade, it should not be any surprise that these mainly white analysts are
now trying to shift the blame or responsibility from themselves to the
Africans. This is a typical case of "blame the victim for his ill-fate." (I
am not saying that Dr Nyang is white, but his position is mostly championed
by white observers/historians.) It is because of this ill-conceived strategy
by the perpetrators of the slave trade that i think it is very inappropriate
for any black person to champion their position. The situation is even made
worse and very DANGEROUS i add, when that banner is being waved by one of
our best minds in the person of Dr Nyang who commands a large following.
I do not dispute that African kings did sell some of their brothers
and sisters into slavery. Nor do i disagree that one must accept
responsibility for one's actions. My problem stems from the fact that Dr
Nyang is putting "American whites, Europeans and continental Africans" on
the same side of the equation, each bearing the same degree of
responsibility in terms of apologizing to "all blacks and persons of mixed
parentage in the Americas." That is not fair to black Africans. Why? Because
even though Africans sold other Africans, that aspect of the slave trade did
not start until very late into the transAtlantic slave trade. I hate the
very notion of SLAVE TRADE. It never started as a trade, rather, the
INVADERS sailed thousands of miles across the Atlantic, used their guns and
rifles to terrorize Africans, kidnapped, raped, and murdered our
foreparents, and in their attempt to justify their atrocities, they came up
with the term SLAVE TRADE to make it appear as if though Africans were equal
partners in this holocaust. Did not some Jews report other Jews in exchange
for sanctuary during Hitler's WW2? ABSOLUTELY!! Do you hear anybody ask them
to take responsibility on equal footing with their Nazi exterminators? Of
course not!! Why? The answer is obvious. They are Whites!! Gambia-l, do you
see where i'm headed with this argument? I'm sure you do, so be patient please.
Finally, the context of the Africans' involvement in SLAVERY (i
refuse to call it the SLAVE TRADE from now onwards) has to be addressed to
justify my position. With guns and rifles possessed by the invaders against
inferior tools of warfare possessed by the Africans, the option, or rather
the ULTIMATUM was very clear. African kings had to sell some of their people
and get something in return to help in the rebuilding process resulting from
lost manpower/labour. The devil's alternative was to fight and be killed or
captured and sent to slavery anyway. So we see that it was a prudent choice
for the African kings to choose the option they did. At the same time, we
have to mention that some did choose to fight, and they did so to the bitter
end. The fight continued deep into captivity in the western hemisphere as
evidenced by the mutiny on board the Spanish ship "La Amistad" in 1839,
which is currently a subject of great controversy here in America.
I conclude by saying that i hold no African responsible for slavery.
I contend that had the Europeans and Americans not gone to Africa, then
there would not have been any slavery to the magnitude that we experienced.
As self appointed Special Prosecutor for Africa, i herewith indict the
western perpetrators of slavery. On the other hand, as both Judge and Jury
of this Special Prosecution, i convict the west to eternal pillory and their
sentence must start with an apology to Africa for crimes committed during
and after slavery. About two months ago, the Catholic Church offered an
official apology to the Jews for not doing anything against Hitler's
holocaust. Why then can't they do the same thing about the holocaust
suffered by Africans? Again, the answer is obvious. I therefore charge the
religious denominations with incest and rape of African resources. I better
shut up 'cos i'm beginning to sound much like MUTABARUKA in "The People's
Court."
Dr Nyang, even though i am not qualified to make this assessment
regarding the rest of your analysis on slavery, i humbly beg to say thank
you very much for a thorough and very informative article. I must admit that
i have never thought about slavery in Africa in the context that you
espoused upon in dealing with the subject matter. Your elaborate views for
or against my position on who should bear responsibility will also be
greatly appreciated. Thanks again. Much respect!!!
It's been a pleasure Gambia-l. Thanx for your attention. Peace!!!!!

It's Tamsir.


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 01:28:19 EST
From: Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Forwarded posting from Dr Sulayman Nyang
Message-ID: <3eab489.34961f85@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Hello Tamsir,

I say sorry to the non-Africans especially those affiliated with this forum
if they are offended with my opinion on this subject matter.
I totally agree with your comments on slavery and the African position in it.
I have always been opposed the theory that we had a direct play of that wicked
past,we have never been and we will never be that way.The best example of our
nature is being currently displayed in South Africa where we are forgiving
people who has done unforgetable things to us as well.The fact that our
forefathers were involved if they ever did was not a mere interest to
accumulate wealth or goods but as a strategy to save our race.Like you
said,they had no choice with guns and mottars against their heads.What they
knew about slaves and the white people had in mind were totally different.I
think that every Gambian knows that especially at the time of "TOBASKI" or
"KORITEH" OR IN our naming ceremonies.Its nothing different from those days.I
would like to summon all Africans and African Governments to call on the west
to to accept the their wrong doing and come up with and apology to all
Africans and the people of color with African heritage.I also demand that all
the artifacts and stolen resources be returned immediately.

Baboucar

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 09:21:59 +0100
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Babading Sissoho
Message-ID: <9B236DF9AF96CF11A5C94044F32190311DB37C@DKDIFS02>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Friends, at the fantastic Yundum airport, while I was waiting for a
plane, I counted 9 big planes, all of them belonging to Mr. Sissoho. He
must be rich, because I was told that they were not frequently
operating. We know from the competition among the national
flight-compagnies in Europe, that it is costy every hour the plane is
parked. Rumours (which one should not spread) was saying, that Mr.
Sissoho didn=B4t pay, or have not payed for long time, for the
airport-service and parking of his planes in Yundum. So .... Asbj=F8rn
Nordam=20

> ----------
> Fra: Momodou Camara[SMTP:nijii@hotmail.com]
> Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sendt: 12. december 1997 08:46
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: Re: Babading Sissoho
>=20
>=20
> >
> >Today while talking to a friend of mine in the Gambia,I was told =
that
>=20
> Mr
> >Sissoho ,the Malian-Gambian millionaire had a very large and warm
> >welcome in Banjul with jubilations everywhere. He promised to help
> The
> >Gambia a lot of money in the improvements of the Airport and related
> >projects. This is good news for the Gambian business community and
> >confidence building of the country. I hope he will keep his promise =
..
> >The more the investment money, the better for us.
> >He also gave the soccer teams of Gambia and Mali much needed
> financial
> >help.=20
> >
> >Habib Ghanim
> >
>=20
> It is stated in one of the FOROYAA issues recently that Mr. Sissoho
> ows=20
> four million dalasis to the Gambia including the Civil Aviation.
>=20
> Momodou Camara
>=20
>=20
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>=20

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 97 09:28:30 EST
From: Mamadi Corra <MKCORRA@VM.SC.EDU>
To: Gambia-L <GAMBIA-L@U.WASHINGTON.EDU>
Subject: Senegal
Message-ID: <199712161440.GAA04372@mx2.u.washington.edu>

Hello People:
Does anyone know if Senegal has chiefs and how they are called in
the local language (wollof); My friend about to go to Senegal wants to know. H
e has been to Ghana and chief is one of the words he said he had to learn and
would like to know before he goes. I am not even show if senegal has any local
chiefs. I am meeting with my friend for lunch today in about three hours; wit
hin the next three hours if anyone has an answer for me you can please email
at: Mkcorra@vm.sc.edu
Thanks!!!
Mamadi

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 09:38:14 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Is it in our nature?
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD60@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

MUSINGS OF A SISTER LOOKING FOR ANSWERS

Thank you Ancha, Paul, and Awa. I agree with Awa's statement that you
could not have said it any better, Paul. My husband whips up a mean
supa-kanja or chewi-kong every now and again and I have to tell you that
I appreciate it and that it sets a precedent for our son who is
constantly asking to assist me while I am in the kitchen. To Paul, do
you find yourself using more of what it would take your wife to cook the
same meal - my husband tells me it tastes even better - I don't know.

This very subject of a husband cooking for his wife came up the other
day and Gambian women were more disturbed by it than the men and I was
not surprised. They were putting this sister down in the meanest of
ways because her husband cooks and she does not. Well, this sister was
pursuing a masters degree - she leaves the house to go to work early in
the morning, goes to school after work and gets home after nine in the
evening - the husband goes home from work - the husband has no problem
doing what needs to be done in his household, why do the rest of us have
a problem with it? For some reason, we the women help in proliferating
the suffering of our sisters, mothers and aunts - why?

In the cases of spousal abuse I heard of, some Gambian men and women
would not intervene when they see blatant spousal abuse because "I don't
want to be the cause of their divorce" one sister said. I guess they
don't want to be accused 'tass saye' - I ask - what about contributory
homicide? I don't think any one of us feels good or feels absolved of
guilt when our sisters are being maimed and killed in abusive
relationships when we could have done something. Brothers and sisters,
speak up, speak out, show support, give support - how many hens do we
usually keep in a coop at home - plenty and in the morning they all come
out ready to take on the day fluffing their feathers looking good - when
we open our homes to help, it is temporary but that time could be
invaluable to the person being helped.

Ya Soffie


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 10:02:48 -0000
From: "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Is It Our Nature? re: Democratic change
Message-ID: <B0000025103@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Pa Musa Jallow" <pmj@commit.gm>
via Commit


MBK and Famara,
Folks, I think we all agree here in principle about democracy..but what we
have is what I call "psuedo-democracy", if one looks at our story, our so
called democratisation started when the colonialist started packing their
bags, suddenly they received so enlightenment and pushed through this
tribe-based and reward-oriented democracy where govt. just promises and
gives and the people take and take...this is definitely not going to
develop a nation; Banjul has it..what about Serre Kunda or Brikama, Gunjur
has that why not Kartong..this is the type of democratic politics we haave;
Govt.-Party (I really can never tell the dividing line) promises if you
vote for me-us, you will get this and that, if you don't..???
so this form of psuedo-democracy is what we have and had, the RULING party
will never LOSE;
also in our so called democracies, the leader can do no wrong, is always
right, is divinely inspired et cetera for his supporters; and for his
opponents he/she can do no right etc;
--------------
I always contend that if the right thing does not happen, the wrong thing
will; this does not make the WRONG thing right; what we have to do is try
to ensure that the right thing happens;
I have to get back to work, it is the taxpayers' money if i tarry any
longer
bye
pmj


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 11:25:09 -0500 (EST)
From: Raye Sosseh <gt8065b@prism.gatech.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New Member
Message-ID: <199712161625.LAA00099@acmey.gatech.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Managers,
Please add Simeon Robinson to the list......
email: gt6726c@prism.gatech.edu

Thanks

**************************************************************
* Raye Sosseh *
* George Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering *
* Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Georgia, 30332 *
* email: gt8065b@prism.gatech.edu *
* *
* Quote *
* ----- *
* "Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what *
* keeps you going. *
* *
* Jim Ryun *
**************************************************************

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 09:27:27 -0800 (PST)
From: "A. Loum" <tloum@u.washington.edu>
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New member
Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.3.96.971216092618.3131C-100000@saul2.u.washington.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII



Winston Abraham has been added to the list. We welcome him and are looking
forward to his introduction and contributions.

Thanks
Tony Loum


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 12:35:30 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Need info
Message-ID: <9712161735.AA42820@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

When is the beginning of the lunar (and holy) month of Ramadhan?


Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 12:53:52 -0500 (EST)
From: Anna Secka <secka@cse.bridgeport.edu>
To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Need info
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.96.971216125238.3366A-100000@dracula>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

HI moe,
What's up? Anyway I believe that the ramadhan starts on Dec 31.
Well I guess I will talk to you sometime soon. Regards to Muhammed.

Anna


On Tue, 16 Dec 1997, Modou Jallow wrote:

> When is the beginning of the lunar (and holy) month of Ramadhan?
>
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>

---------
Anna Secka
secka@cse.bridgeport.edu

Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent.
-- Salvor Hardin


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 13:04:48 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Need info
Message-ID: <9712161804.AA45430@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Anna, you wrote:

>
> HI moe,
> What's up? Anyway I believe that the ramadhan starts on Dec 31.
> Well I guess I will talk to you sometime soon. Regards to Muhammed.
>
> Anna Secka
> secka@cse.bridgeport.edu


Thank you very much sister Anna. Will talk to you soon.


Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 13:13:45 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Is it in our nature? (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9712161258.A29839-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Ya Soffie wrote:

This very subject of a husband cooking for his wife came up the other
day and Gambian women were more disturbed by it than the men and I was
not surprised. They were putting this sister down in the meanest of
ways because her husband cooks and she does not. Well, this sister was
pursuing a masters degree - she leaves the house to go to work early in
the morning, goes to school after work and gets home after nine in the
evening - the husband goes home from work - the husband has no problem
doing what needs to be done in his household, why do the rest of us have
a problem with it? For some reason, we the women help in proliferating
the suffering of our sisters, mothers and aunts - why?

Ya Soffie, you are soooo right!! I think that one of the biggest problems
is that women put women down. I wonder why that is and I think that it's
the mental conditioning from way back that persists: A woman's place is
in the Kitchen and BEHIND (not beside) her husband. hence when one starts
to deviate from the norm, the men, but mostly the women, resent it. "She
should be at home cooking and taking care of her husband" they say. I
think some men resent it cause it means the women start to become
self-sufficient and not dependent on them, or they feel that their
teritory is being invaded. Women........, i think with women, the
situation is that some wish they could do something more than stay at
home. but because they're afraid of deviating from the norm or are not
willing to fight inorder to be independent, they force the thought out of
their mind and make independence an impossibility, a dream or wish that
can't be fulfilled. And therefore, they resent it when they see other
women doing it. I guess the feeling of resentment gets even worse when
they see husbands (the few that do) supporting their wives. Another
factor is that, I think some women are just so conditioned in thinking
that a woman's place is only in the home, that they cannot concieve the
idea of
being independent " they neglecting their duties as women", i believe is
the thought. Why?????
Paul, you are sooooo right, (I wish there were more like you around) I was
reading your piece and kept saying "you
are soooo right !!!" aloud with a few hand movements. I'm telling you,
people here must really think I'm mad sometimes!!! it's all good!!!
Anyway, why do people (men especially) think that is???? As Paul said,
cooking for your West Indian, white etc girlfriends but not the gambian
ones??? AND ohhhhh!!! here's another interesting situation that I've come
to observe: A couple gets married and are staying overseas somewhere. the
husband learns how to cook, helps take of the child etc. BUT, as soon as
they go back home, he all of a sudden doesn't remember how to cook, and
the child becomes "your child"!!!! it's like, "well, we're back and
don't expect me to do any of that sissy stuff I used to do" ( he has now
become a man!!!). Again my question is, why?????? I know a few married
women who don't want to go back home because they're afraid their
husbands will change.
in the case of spousal abuse, all I can say is that the men that
do hit their wives are insecure whims, since it seems they can only
feel powerful by beating a woman. And the women that refuse to
help......... i guess we need to educate them about the difference
between separating man and wife for the woman's safety and causing a
separation cause of things like rumors etc.
Ancha.




------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 13:09:39 -0600 (CST)
From: Nyang Njie <st0021@student-mail.jsu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: forwarded posting from Dr. Nyang
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.971216104517.32410A-100000@student-mail.jsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

The capture, sale, and use of slaves on the African continent had a long
history. The ancient Egyptians enslaved people;p slavery was an important
form of labor in the Roman Empire and in the Muslim states. Africans from
south of the Sahara were exported to North Africa and to the Middle East
beginning with the arrival of Muslim traders in these regions. Thus, the
Europeans who came later continued a well-established tradition of selling
African as human cargo to plantations in the new world, but this does not
justify the existence of slavery. Personally, I believe that slavery
existed in part because it was tolerated by some of the rulers of that
time.
Tamsir I agree with you to an extent, but also we have to put aside our
emotions for a minute and rationalize that slavery would not have been
as sucessful as it was without the help of Africans. First of all most of
the slaves captured were from the interior of Africa, and most of the
Europeans could not survive in the heartland because they were susceptible
to diseases that the Africans were immune to. Therefore this created
middle men who profited from the capturing and transporting of
slaves to the coast. Also the Africans contributed in slavery because of
our naivety and feeling of complacency. We were always open to strangers
and if we had learned our lessons from the past such things as slavery
could have been avoided. Africa's greatest empires were destroyed and
faced out by outsiders. The Songhai empire was invaded by the Morrocans,
Ghana empire by the Almoravids, Egypt by the Hyksos and the Romans. We
have allowed history to repeat it self time and time again. I don't think
that we are equally responsible for slavery as the Europeans, but we
(Africans) should learn how to take responsibility for our actions.

Regardless which position is deemed appropriate the historical record
shows that the new world could not have developed without the wealth that
African slave labor produced for the various European nation states that
were involved in the "slave trade." Prior to the introduction of Africans
into the new world as slave labor the European colonial enterprises were
unprofitable.

Jere Jef:
Daddy Njie.

*************************************************
** Until the lions have their own historians, **
** the tale of the hunt **
** will always glorify the hunter. **
*************************************************


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 14:32:07 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Need info
Message-ID: <3496D737.589A@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Modou Jallow wrote:
>
> When is the beginning of the lunar (and holy) month of Ramadhan?
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
Tuesday December 30 th 1997, Inshallah
and Eid el Fitr-Koriteh (end of Ramadan) will be celebrated here at the
Muslim Community center on the29 th of January. (according to the moon
sighting committee)
Habib Diab Ghanim
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 14:56:01 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Is it in our nature?
Message-ID: <3496DCD1.90C@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Ceesay Soffie wrote:
>
> MUSINGS OF A SISTER LOOKING FOR ANSWERS
>
> Thank you Ancha, Paul, and Awa. I agree with Awa's statement that you
> could not have said it any better, Paul. My husband whips up a mean
> supa-kanja or chewi-kong every now and again and I have to tell you that
> I appreciate it and that it sets a precedent for our son who is
> constantly asking to assist me while I am in the kitchen. To Paul, do
> you find yourself using more of what it would take your wife to cook the
> same meal - my husband tells me it tastes even better - I don't know.
>
> This very subject of a husband cooking for his wife came up the other
> day and Gambian women were more disturbed by it than the men and I was
> not surprised. They were putting this sister down in the meanest of
> ways because her husband cooks and she does not. Well, this sister was
> pursuing a masters degree - she leaves the house to go to work early in
> the morning, goes to school after work and gets home after nine in the
> evening - the husband goes home from work - the husband has no problem
> doing what needs to be done in his household, why do the rest of us have
> a problem with it? For some reason, we the women help in proliferating
> the suffering of our sisters, mothers and aunts - why?
>
> In the cases of spousal abuse I heard of, some Gambian men and women
> would not intervene when they see blatant spousal abuse because "I don't
> want to be the cause of their divorce" one sister said. I guess they
> don't want to be accused 'tass saye' - I ask - what about contributory
> homicide? I don't think any one of us feels good or feels absolved of
> guilt when our sisters are being maimed and killed in abusive
> relationships when we could have done something. Brothers and sisters,
> speak up, speak out, show support, give support - how many hens do we
> usually keep in a coop at home - plenty and in the morning they all come
> out ready to take on the day fluffing their feathers looking good - when
> we open our homes to help, it is temporary but that time could be
> invaluable to the person being helped.
>
> Ya Soffie
>
well said especially on the wife beating. It is wrong and unacceptable.
Habib
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 15:22:48 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712162022.AA46252@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Folks, this is a forwarded message from an African American friend of
mine. I would like you to help answer his question(s), if you please.

Thank you.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

>
>
> Moe, I am very curious upon a manner. Last night I and a fellow white co
> worker was discussing racism. He hit me with a fact that I could not
> retort. "Africans do not care for African Americans because they are
> Americans..."
>
> I would have attempted to argue this case, but I have long felt before this
> argument that there was or is resentment of some sort from
> Africa towards ......for lack of a better word: "slave descendants".
>
> Could you elaborate on the impressions and feelings Africans (overall and
> in general) hold for African Americans??
>
> Please feel free to ask your friends on the Gambia chat group to comment.
>
> Bernard
>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 16:05:31 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD61@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

Brother Bernard -

The reverse could be said that African Americans do not care about
continental Africans because their ancestors' actions contributed to
your being here. But, the famous tactic, by the colonialists, of
pitting brother against brother is still en vogue today. By the by,
what is your friend's basis for the statement he made?

I once worked with a brother who wanted to go the Africa (I suggested he
go to Gambia or one of the countries for Africa is soo big) because he
wanted to know how it felt to go around bare-foot, living in a tree and
all sorts of other nonsense - I don't have to wonder where he got the
notion that people in Africa live in trees. That some Africans think
some African Americans could be better off than they are but don't want
to because they are lazy is not an original thought - I don't have to
wonder from where they got that notion.

Also, if brother Moe is your friend, how do you relate to each other; do
you sense that he does not care for and about you because you are
American? I don't think so. Yes, you have an answer for your co-worker
- give yourself time before responding. There is a bridge to be gapped
between continental and American Africans, no doubt. It will take each
of us on our individual dealings to be REAL and find out about each
other ONE-ON-ONE then the big picture will emerge.

Soffie


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 16:16:20 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Senegal
Message-ID: <3496EFA4.56B7@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Mamadi Corra wrote:
>
> Hello People:
> Does anyone know if Senegal has chiefs and how they are called in
> the local language (wollof); My friend about to go to Senegal wants to know. H
> e has been to Ghana and chief is one of the words he said he had to learn and
> would like to know before he goes. I am not even show if senegal has any local
> chiefs. I am meeting with my friend for lunch today in about three hours; wit
> hin the next three hours if anyone has an answer for me you can please email
> at: Mkcorra@vm.sc.edu
> Thanks!!!
> Mamadi
I believe it is the same as in theGambia--SEYFOU--
Habib
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 23:03:42 +0000
From: f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re. Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <19971216230340.AAA15176@harrison.0.acs.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Sister Soffie,

You're just incredible. There couldn't be a better answer to Bernard's on
purpose query. Black America must accept us as their brothers and sisters
just as their counterparts in the United Kingdom. If we were to overcome
the predicaments that lie ahead of us as a race, then we must robustly come
together as one in regardless to our country of origin or nationality. We
cannot and must not let such detestable concepts overshadow our dreams.

Famara Demba.


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 17:18:40 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988E62@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

I totally appreciate your comments Sister Soffie. I think we must
remember that first any unfamiliar situation or person causes a wariness
in ourselves. Also our points of reference for any topic are usually
very different; not right or wrong (i.e., in America, it's the negative
news coverage). On another note, if a people clean other's houses and
plant and harvest another's crops, I would call that people industrious
not lazy, etc. Also individual's priorities differ (i.e., school,
family, money, etc.). I must go now but I appreciate all the comments I
have read. Happy Holidays full of justice, unity, peace and love.

Keretha

> ----------
> From: Ceesay Soffie[SMTP:Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com]
> Reply To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 1997 3:05 PM
> To: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Subject: RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
>
> Brother Bernard -
>
> The reverse could be said that African Americans do not care about
> continental Africans because their ancestors' actions contributed to
> your being here. But, the famous tactic, by the colonialists, of
> pitting brother against brother is still en vogue today. By the by,
> what is your friend's basis for the statement he made?
>
> I once worked with a brother who wanted to go the Africa (I suggested
> he
> go to Gambia or one of the countries for Africa is soo big) because he
> wanted to know how it felt to go around bare-foot, living in a tree
> and
> all sorts of other nonsense - I don't have to wonder where he got the
> notion that people in Africa live in trees. That some Africans think
> some African Americans could be better off than they are but don't
> want
> to because they are lazy is not an original thought - I don't have to
> wonder from where they got that notion.
>
> Also, if brother Moe is your friend, how do you relate to each other;
> do
> you sense that he does not care for and about you because you are
> American? I don't think so. Yes, you have an answer for your
> co-worker
> - give yourself time before responding. There is a bridge to be
> gapped
> between continental and American Africans, no doubt. It will take
> each
> of us on our individual dealings to be REAL and find out about each
> other ONE-ON-ONE then the big picture will emerge.
>
> Soffie
>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 00:50:39 +0100
From: Bala S Jallow <bala@algonet.se>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <349713CF.2CBA4DA0@algonet.se>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Soffie!
I felt like as you picked the words out of my mouth concerning this
particular issue. Well done.
It was actually nice of Bernard to forward his wonders, questions, claims or
call it what ever you like to someone who comes from the continent that all
other races seems to see very inferior upon. To make it short i would love
to see the end of this issue especially when the whole picture emerges.

Ceesay Soffie wrote:

> Brother Bernard -
>
> The reverse could be said that African Americans do not care about
> continental Africans because their ancestors' actions contributed to
> your being here. But, the famous tactic, by the colonialists, of
> pitting brother against brother is still en vogue today. By the by,
> what is your friend's basis for the statement he made?
>
> I once worked with a brother who wanted to go the Africa (I suggested he
> go to Gambia or one of the countries for Africa is soo big) because he
> wanted to know how it felt to go around bare-foot, living in a tree and
> all sorts of other nonsense - I don't have to wonder where he got the
> notion that people in Africa live in trees. That some Africans think
> some African Americans could be better off than they are but don't want
> to because they are lazy is not an original thought - I don't have to
> wonder from where they got that notion.
>
> Also, if brother Moe is your friend, how do you relate to each other; do
> you sense that he does not care for and about you because you are
> American? I don't think so. Yes, you have an answer for your co-worker
> - give yourself time before responding. There is a bridge to be gapped
> between continental and American Africans, no doubt. It will take each
> of us on our individual dealings to be REAL and find out about each
> other ONE-ON-ONE then the big picture will emerge.
>
> Soffie



--
/Bala & Family



------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 13:20:42 +1200
From: Saikou B M Njai <sbn13@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: introduction
Message-ID: <D5621715CE@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>

Hi TENN,

Your aunt Oumi (Taye) is sending you her greeetings.
She came here in August to join me ( her husband).
I am studying for Master of Engineering Management.
Are you intouch with Bagura? We wish you success in your studies.

Saikou and OumiI Njai
Flat K6, 14 Kirkwood Avenue
Riccarton Christchurch, New Zealand
Phone - 64 3 341 2243
Saikou B M Njai
Postgraduate Student Room E311
Department of Civil Engineering
University of Canterbury
P M B 4800
Christchurch,N Z

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 18:21:25 -0600
From: Ndey Drammeh <NDRAMME@wpo.it.luc.edu>
To: bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca, gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE: Is it in our nature? (fwd) -Reply
Message-ID: <s496c7a3.090@wpo.it.luc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Disposition: inline

Ancha,

Thank a bunch for raising some very interesting questions. Here is what I
have to add to all that has already been said:

Perhaps, it is time that we start moving from a society where everything
is defined in terms of "rigid gender roles" to a "genderless" society, if
you will. As we all know, the individual is the building block of society.
Therefore, any change in societal attitudes would have to start with
within individual families. So you parents out there, please encourage
your children to pursue "human activities," feminine as well as masculine
ones. Children that grow up in a society where they are encouraged to
pursue activities that they enjoy will grow up to be adults that are very
open minded by societal roles.

Of course, there are certain things that women are better at and others
that men are better. However, we should strive for a society where
there is a lot of flexibility in terms of the qualities men and women can
and should possess, and the roles that they play. Thanks for reading,

Kumbis


>>> Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca> 12/16/97 12:13pm
>>>
Ya Soffie wrote:

This very subject of a husband cooking for his wife came up the other
day and Gambian women were more disturbed by it than the men and I
was
not surprised. They were putting this sister down in the meanest of
ways because her husband cooks and she does not. Well, this sister
was
pursuing a masters degree - she leaves the house to go to work early in
the morning, goes to school after work and gets home after nine in the
evening - the husband goes home from work - the husband has no
problem
doing what needs to be done in his household, why do the rest of us
have
a problem with it? For some reason, we the women help in proliferating
the suffering of our sisters, mothers and aunts - why?

Ya Soffie, you are soooo right!! I think that one of the biggest problems
is that women put women down. I wonder why that is and I think that it's
the mental conditioning from way back that persists: A woman's place is
in the Kitchen and BEHIND (not beside) her husband. hence when one
starts
to deviate from the norm, the men, but mostly the women, resent it. "She
should be at home cooking and taking care of her husband" they say. I
think some men resent it cause it means the women start to become
self-sufficient and not dependent on them, or they feel that their
teritory is being invaded. Women........, i think with women, the
situation is that some wish they could do something more than stay at
home. but because they're afraid of deviating from the norm or are not
willing to fight inorder to be independent, they force the thought out of
their mind and make independence an impossibility, a dream or wish that
can't be fulfilled. And therefore, they resent it when they see other
women doing it. I guess the feeling of resentment gets even worse
when
they see husbands (the few that do) supporting their wives. Another
factor is that, I think some women are just so conditioned in thinking
that a woman's place is only in the home, that they cannot concieve the
idea of
being independent " they neglecting their duties as women", i believe is
the thought. Why?????
Paul, you are sooooo right, (I wish there were more like you around) I
was
reading your piece and kept saying "you
are soooo right !!!" aloud with a few hand movements. I'm telling you,
people here must really think I'm mad sometimes!!! it's all good!!!
Anyway, why do people (men especially) think that is???? As Paul said,
cooking for your West Indian, white etc girlfriends but not the gambian
ones??? AND ohhhhh!!! here's another interesting situation that I've come
to observe: A couple gets married and are staying overseas
somewhere. the
husband learns how to cook, helps take of the child etc. BUT, as soon as

they go back home, he all of a sudden doesn't remember how to cook,
and
the child becomes "your child"!!!! it's like, "well, we're back and
don't expect me to do any of that sissy stuff I used to do" ( he has now
become a man!!!). Again my question is, why?????? I know a few
married
women who don't want to go back home because they're afraid their
husbands will change.
in the case of spousal abuse, all I can say is that the men that
do hit their wives are insecure whims, since it seems they can only
feel powerful by beating a woman. And the women that refuse to
help......... i guess we need to educate them about the difference
between separating man and wife for the woman's safety and causing a

separation cause of things like rumors etc.
Ancha.





------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 20:50:54 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Is it in our nature?
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971216205054.0068a760@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Awa,
Thank you for the comment. What I posted was a fact and I hope all the
guys realize that we now live in the 1990's and gradually crawling into the
21st century. The woman is the other half. After all, the only difference
is that, she is the "MAN" with the "WOMB", which eventually made her the
"WOMAN", the word that is familiar to all of us. Peace!!!!!!!!!!!
Paul Gibba.

At 09:03 PM 12/15/97 EST, you wrote:
>Mr. Gibba:
>
>I was on the verge of adding my 2 cents to the topic at hand, when I stumbled
>onto your posting..... You said it all for me!!.
>
>And for those "brothers" who think you are deviating from the norm, tell them
>they are insecure. The preacher and islamic scholar encourages men to honor
>their wives (even though "TRADITION" reversed that role).
>
>Guys like you and my brother (Malanding Jaiteh) will have relationships that
>last simply because you cherish, honor, and respect your wonderful wives.
>
>Thank you very much brothers, and I salute you for not letting those insecure
>"brothers" intimidate you - keep it up!!!
>
>Awa Sey
>
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 00:55:52 -0000
From: "pmj@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <B0000025381@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Pa Musa Jallow" <pmj@commit.gm>
via Commit


Moe,
To your African-American friend and his Euro-American friend, I want to say
that the qusetion is very general and at the same time narrow-minded (no
insults intended); it is like saying Gambians hate Senegalese..to which I
say..we do and we don't...w are the same but different people, why..because
of what I call CULTURIZATION..English and French; Common Law and Napoleonic
Code etc..
First in the 80s before Mandela was released I was a student in a
Historically black school..Florida A&M University, with a majority
African-American student and faculty body, the girls did not want to date
or talk to us because we were "jungle bunnies"..did we have cars and roads,
...where did I learn how to drive? The guys made fun of us etc..it was
mostly childish and ignorant..but mostly not from kids; it was untenable
but gradually AFRICA this and that became the In thing and everyone was
like MANDELA, SOUTH AFRICA, AFRICA ain't free; you are not from GAMBIA but
from AFRICA; Actually I really believe I became an AFRICAN (really) in
AMERICA;
to get back to the point, we are all one and the same AFRICAN peoples..but
have over the past 400 years had different CULTURIZATION; Jamaicans have a
more positie attitude towards us..AFRICans than say BAHAMIANS who wanted to
be more AMERICAN than otherwise; in varying degrees the consciousness and
willingness to be AFRICAN varied; with us AFRICANS, the NIGERIANS and
GAMBIANs were most comfortable with their AFRICANNESS than say the SIERRA
LEONEANS and esp. GHANAIANS..surprisingly (this is my experience);
some of the Africans felt the AFrican-Americans paid lip-service to the
Africa Thing but did not live what they preach, they behave AMERICAn and I
say of course..after 300-400 years CULTURIZATION why not..on the other
hand, the stereotypical white AMERICAN differs from a stereotypical
EUROPEAN, they have been more culturised in the melting pot;
Now having touched on the earlier lack of consciousness and awareness of
Africa and Africans by African-Americans, I must relate the other side, in
1986, as a Sixth Former at Gambia High School, some African-Americans at
the U S Embassy on Martin Luther King Day(now a Federal Holiday) came to
the school to show clips (movie) of the STRUGGLE against SEGREGATION and
the marches in SELMA, etc..and guess what, most of the Sixth Formers, then
Gambia's highest seat of Education, with its BEST and BRIGHTEST found the
police attacking the MARCHERS with water canons and batons and dogs
HILARIOUS..to such extent that the SHOW was ABORTED; I felt so sad for the
AFRICAN-AMERICANS who bore the BRUNT of the SHAME especially since some
WHITE AMERCAns (sorry but I am tiredof the POLITICAL-CORRECTNESS) came
along for MORAL SUPPORT...
my point is OUR peoples have been poorly EDUCATED and SENSITISED BUT OUR
STORY and STRUGGLE for HUMAN DIGNITY is the SAME and GOES for DOWNTRODDEN
PEOPLES...
It is CHANGING BUT whether we know it or not; OUR STORY is the SAME with
different sub-plots;
so Moe, tell your AFRICAN-AMERICAN friend that it is like the brother in
the GHETTO, whether you are well off or not; if you are a brother, your
troubles are the same; you have to care cos unless his lot improves, you
will be judged by his conduct
In answer to the question, YES THOSE AFRICANS And AFRICAN_AMERICANS WHO
KNOW BETTER DO CARE FOR EACH OTHER
and I say to BERNARD..ASK your white FRIEND..ENGLISH, IRISH, POLISH or
ITALIAN about how much the ENGLISH, IRISH, POLISH etc..CARE FOR HIM;
ps..sorry ladies I am using the bro thing to make my point in the context
I hope i have contributed meaningful to this discourse
pmj
----------
>


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 21:41:39 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE: Is it in our nature?
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971216214139.0068eea0@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Soffie,
Your posting is well taken. Thank you very much. First of all, my wife is
now used to my cooking and she loves every bit of it. I can cook a variety
of sumptous Gambian dishes, including "supa-kanja". Bravo to your lovely
husband. Tell him to keep up the good work. I really commend him for
taking that bold action. It takes two to tango not only in tango dance but
also in a marriage. As for your dear young son, continue to teach him that
it is healthy and good to respect women and to participate in the so-called
"women's domestic roles". Gender-bias has no room in the modern world. Let
him learn that as lesson number one and not only him, but you and your
husband will reap the fruit of your labour.
What I want the brothers as well as the sisters to know is that, many
things that are now considered "TRADITIONAL" were never so. A lot of these
things were colonial inventions. Most of them were Victorian values which
were part of the colonial package. Unfortunately, as the former colonizers
threw away such archaic Victorian valies, the former colonized people held
firmly to them. Try telling our dear mothers back home about the
double-burden that they face everyday, and they will not hasitate to tell
you that all their domestic chores are "TRADITONAL". As men, our moms,
sisters, aunts, nieces, and yes, some wives, will not allow us to
participate fully in the execution of household work because it is
"TRADITIONAL" for women to shoulder that burden. What a shame and
exploitation. Let me ask all you a question. Who does most of the cooking
and dishwashing in hotels, restaurants and other eateries? Find out and
let me know. If your answer is men, as I am convinced that they are, why
then, are men not doing the same at home when the other person to be eating
the food is none order than the one who said, "YES I DO", at least in the
Western sense.
As for many of the sisters who internalized this "TRADITIONAL"
double-burden ideology, they should take a second look at things.
Questioning these things do not make you a "BAD" wife neither does it make
me and men like me "BAD" men, at least in the eyes of some "brothers".
Only a marriage that was not solid in the first place can be broken as a
result of one partner wanting the other to play a more responsible and
positive role in the marriage. I admit that patriarchy is deeply-rooted in
our society (Gambian) but we must change it.
HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Paul Gibba.

At 09:38 AM 12/16/97 -0500, you wrote:
>MUSINGS OF A SISTER LOOKING FOR ANSWERS
>
>Thank you Ancha, Paul, and Awa. I agree with Awa's statement that you
>could not have said it any better, Paul. My husband whips up a mean
>supa-kanja or chewi-kong every now and again and I have to tell you that
>I appreciate it and that it sets a precedent for our son who is
>constantly asking to assist me while I am in the kitchen. To Paul, do
>you find yourself using more of what it would take your wife to cook the
>same meal - my husband tells me it tastes even better - I don't know.
>
>This very subject of a husband cooking for his wife came up the other
>day and Gambian women were more disturbed by it than the men and I was
>not surprised. They were putting this sister down in the meanest of
>ways because her husband cooks and she does not. Well, this sister was
>pursuing a masters degree - she leaves the house to go to work early in
>the morning, goes to school after work and gets home after nine in the
>evening - the husband goes home from work - the husband has no problem
>doing what needs to be done in his household, why do the rest of us have
>a problem with it? For some reason, we the women help in proliferating
>the suffering of our sisters, mothers and aunts - why?
>
>In the cases of spousal abuse I heard of, some Gambian men and women
>would not intervene when they see blatant spousal abuse because "I don't
>want to be the cause of their divorce" one sister said. I guess they
>don't want to be accused 'tass saye' - I ask - what about contributory
>homicide? I don't think any one of us feels good or feels absolved of
>guilt when our sisters are being maimed and killed in abusive
>relationships when we could have done something. Brothers and sisters,
>speak up, speak out, show support, give support - how many hens do we
>usually keep in a coop at home - plenty and in the morning they all come
>out ready to take on the day fluffing their feathers looking good - when
>we open our homes to help, it is temporary but that time could be
>invaluable to the person being helped.
>
> Ya Soffie
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 22:06:38 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: RE: Is it in our nature? (fwd)
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971216220638.00690b10@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


Ancha,
Those men who leave everything to the care of their wives when they return
to the Gambia should be ashamed of themselves. I guess they refuse to be
seen by the so-called "TRADITIONALISTS" as "weak men". Hey! there is
absolutely nothing macho about exploiting or even degrading a woman who is
your other half. In fact, some of these men who pretend to be outwardly
macho among their peers are the very ones who shamelessly carry their wives
on their backs in the privacy of their homes. So I warn "progressive
brothers" to be wary of such visible manifestation of machomanism.
Marriage is a sacred institution and it should be handled with great care.
Women are not only our wives, but they are also our mothers, sisters,
aunts, and sisters. In fact, it is noteworthy that a woman who is
maltreated somewhere may be your own mother, sister, aunt, or niece as well
as she may be mine.
Paul Gibba.

At 01:13 PM 12/16/97 -0500, you wrote:
>Ya Soffie wrote:
>
>This very subject of a husband cooking for his wife came up the other
>day and Gambian women were more disturbed by it than the men and I was
>not surprised. They were putting this sister down in the meanest of
>ways because her husband cooks and she does not. Well, this sister was
>pursuing a masters degree - she leaves the house to go to work early in
>the morning, goes to school after work and gets home after nine in the
>evening - the husband goes home from work - the husband has no problem
>doing what needs to be done in his household, why do the rest of us have
>a problem with it? For some reason, we the women help in proliferating
>the suffering of our sisters, mothers and aunts - why?
>
>Ya Soffie, you are soooo right!! I think that one of the biggest problems
>is that women put women down. I wonder why that is and I think that it's
>the mental conditioning from way back that persists: A woman's place is
>in the Kitchen and BEHIND (not beside) her husband. hence when one starts
>to deviate from the norm, the men, but mostly the women, resent it. "She
>should be at home cooking and taking care of her husband" they say. I
>think some men resent it cause it means the women start to become
>self-sufficient and not dependent on them, or they feel that their
>teritory is being invaded. Women........, i think with women, the
>situation is that some wish they could do something more than stay at
>home. but because they're afraid of deviating from the norm or are not
>willing to fight inorder to be independent, they force the thought out of
>their mind and make independence an impossibility, a dream or wish that
>can't be fulfilled. And therefore, they resent it when they see other
>women doing it. I guess the feeling of resentment gets even worse when
>they see husbands (the few that do) supporting their wives. Another
>factor is that, I think some women are just so conditioned in thinking
>that a woman's place is only in the home, that they cannot concieve the
>idea of
>being independent " they neglecting their duties as women", i believe is
>the thought. Why?????
>Paul, you are sooooo right, (I wish there were more like you around) I was
>reading your piece and kept saying "you
>are soooo right !!!" aloud with a few hand movements. I'm telling you,
>people here must really think I'm mad sometimes!!! it's all good!!!
>Anyway, why do people (men especially) think that is???? As Paul said,
>cooking for your West Indian, white etc girlfriends but not the gambian
>ones??? AND ohhhhh!!! here's another interesting situation that I've come
>to observe: A couple gets married and are staying overseas somewhere. the
>husband learns how to cook, helps take of the child etc. BUT, as soon as
>they go back home, he all of a sudden doesn't remember how to cook, and
>the child becomes "your child"!!!! it's like, "well, we're back and
>don't expect me to do any of that sissy stuff I used to do" ( he has now
>become a man!!!). Again my question is, why?????? I know a few married
>women who don't want to go back home because they're afraid their
>husbands will change.
> in the case of spousal abuse, all I can say is that the men that
>do hit their wives are insecure whims, since it seems they can only
>feel powerful by beating a woman. And the women that refuse to
>help......... i guess we need to educate them about the difference
>between separating man and wife for the woman's safety and causing a
>separation cause of things like rumors etc.
> Ancha.
>
>
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 23:34:19 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Wife Beating
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971216233419.00689304@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Ancha,
I am glad that you raised the question of wife-beating. Of course, women
who fear the heavy hand of their husbands may be genuinely reluctant to
return to the Gambia under that circumstance. It is indeed, an abomination
and a shameful act to beat a woman. One cannot show his machismo by
engaging in such barbaric and irresponsible act. Some of the first things
that I told my wife the very first day she stepped her foot in our
appartment in Toronto, were that, she was and still is free to express
herself concerning our marriage and life-style. I also told her that I
WILL NEVER EVER INSULT OR BEAT HER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES. Nothing
justifies or warrants beating a grown-up person let alone a wife. It is
even unwise to beat a child much more one who you consider to be your
partner for life. After all, what do one gain from beating a partner. If
one wants to be that violent, it is better to seek service (military)
somewhere where such "skills" may be needed. (I don't know where).
Beating your wife is nothing less than a shameful sign of weakness and
barbarism. It is cowardice. To quote Okonkwo (Things Fall Apart- Achebe),
The days when "men were men and women were women" is over. It is now
belatedly time to realize that women have the same feelings like men. They
can feel both emotional and physical pain when inflicted on them. As a
man, how do you feel when the woman that you hurt or are hurting is the
very one whose face you look at everyday and night? How do you react or
even feel when the woman who is sobbing in the remote corner of your
livingroom or bedroom is the potential or actual mother of your lovely
daughter or son? What kind of a cycle of violence are you unwittingly or
flagrantly encouraging within your household? Have you ever thought what
your children, especially male ones, might do in terms of their
relationship with women when they grow up? Hey! you shameful dad, what a
bad role model you are. Let us put an end to violence against women and
children for that matter. We gain absolutely nothing by being violent
against the ones we claim to love.
Can you imagine a woman leaving all the love and confort of her parents
only to fall prey to a shameless and abusive husband? Ironically, this
unfortunate sister may have nobody else in the Americas or Europe and thus
look on to her abusive husband as her protector. What a serious mental
breakdown will this poor woman have? Guys, remember that abuse has many
ugly heads. You may think that you are not abusive because you are not
physically beating your wife. However, I must tell you that psychological
torture is one of the most serious forms of abuse. This may involve
insults, name-calling and be-littling of your wife in every aspect of her
life. These things can make your wife feel home-sick and may result in
depression, thus ruining her expectations of an enviable and everlasting
union.
Remember, I am not claiming to be a psychologist nor a pshychiatrist, but
what I am saying is important, at least to those who will take their
precious time to read and understand.
Till next time, I wish you all the best that you wish for yourselves.
Remember, hands-off from your wives who are the other unquestionable
halves of your beings. Give your wives the best presents (LOVE) in this
holiday period. THAT WOULD NOT MAKE YOU A SISSY BUT RATHER A GENUINE
MACHOMAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Paul Gibba.


------------------------------

Momodou



Denmark
10540 Posts

Posted - 10 Sep 2021 :  16:04:24  Show Profile Send Momodou a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 22:45:24 EST
From: Lamtoro <Lamtoro@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <5100eb25.34974ad6@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Hello Bernard,

I can tell you that a lot of Africans don't really feel that way and they are
not really worried about racial differences.African Americans lookdown upon
Africans thinking that they are better off.Africans relate more to the west
Indies brothers and europeans than you guys.They respect their heritage and
they see us as partners than rivals which the Americans see us as.well I have
to go now but I will address more of it later

Baboucar
Lamtoro@aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 08:47:35 +0100
From: momodou@inform-bbs.dk (Momodou Camara)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: New Member
Message-ID: <647101.2219558@inform-bbs.dk>

Greetings,
Ebrima Ceesay has been added to the Bantaba. Welcome to Gambia-l Ebrima, we
look forward to your contributions. You can send a brief introduction. Our
address is gambia-l@u.washington.edu

Regards
Momodou Camara


******************************************************** *
* E-mails:- momodou@inform-bbs.dk *
* or *
* mcamara@post3.tele.dk *
* *
* Homepage: http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara *
**********************************************************
--- OffRoad 1.9v registered to Momodou Camara




------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 10:02:26 -0000
From: "janko.fofana@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Introduction
Message-ID: <B0000025612@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
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Sent by "Janko Fofana" <janko.fofana@commit.gm>
via Commit


This is to introduce myself as a new member to the Gambia-L service. I am a
staff of the department of agriculture in the Gambia and perhaps some of
you on the list will remember me. I was a student in the United States
between 1994 to 1996 studying for my Master's degree at Western Illinois
University.

As a matter of fact, I was in the list during my student days and indeed
enjoyed the Gambia-L. Now that I am in the Gambia, I hope to again
contribute to the list and give you some updates on Gambia's development
efforts especially in the field of agriculture.

My colleagues at the office here; Mr. Sana Jabang and Ramatoulie Sanyang
are sending their best regards to you. They will love to hear from
colleagues like Saihou Njai and wife in New Zealand.

So until I start the ball rolling by sending in my first contribution, I
believe I want to stop here.

Thanks

Janko S.B. Fofana
Agric. Input Office. Gambia.


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 09:50:41 -0000
From: "janko.fofana@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: introduction
Message-ID: <B0000025607@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
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Sent by "Janko Fofana" <janko.fofana@commit.gm>
via Commit




----------
> From: Saikou B M Njai <sbn13@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: introduction
> Date: Wednesday, December 17, 1997 1:20 AM
>
> Hi TENN,
>
> Your aunt Oumi (Taye) is sending you her greeetings.
> She came here in August to join me ( her husband).
> I am studying for Master of Engineering Management.
> Are you intouch with Bagura? We wish you success in your studies.
>
> Saikou and OumiI Njai
> Flat K6, 14 Kirkwood Avenue
> Riccarton Christchurch, New Zealand
> Phone - 64 3 341 2243
> Saikou B M Njai
> Postgraduate Student Room E311
> Department of Civil Engineering
> University of Canterbury
> P M B 4800
> Christchurch,N Z
>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 13:20:59 +0100
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <9B236DF9AF96CF11A5C94044F32190311DB381@DKDIFS02>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Ceesay Soffie, you are maybe right. But how come that I as a white,
western representative often feel that I have more in common to a black
african, than a white european neighbour ? How come that I can feel
more solidarity with an indian-american, than a white-american, who in
your term is my "brother or sister", because they are white descendants
of some danes who went to US, or descendants of some poor people who
immigrated from Ireland, or from european criminals exported to US. If
I should use the term used by some of you, they are my brothers and
sisters. But even so I do not feel more sympathy with them. Is this =
also
a result of tactics ? I just ask, I have no answers.
Why do some of you think that there is a "conspiracy" among me and my
friends, towards blacks or africans, the same moment you see our skin,
come to know our names and where we live ? Why do you expect more
solidarity among blacks all over the world ("we have to stay together
and not pitty one another because we are black skinned and then
brothers and sisters") for the reason that such a solidarity should
exist among the whites ? (that is what you say indirectly, that we,
because we are white, stay together against other "colors") If I was
born in Kerewan, The Gambia, by white parents, named Asbj=F8rn Modou =
Lamin
Nordam, and later presented me to the Gambia list as Modou Lamin from
Kerewan. How would you judge my contributions to the list ? From the
words and opinions I put there, or from my name and birthplace ? So
please all of you, even we can find a lot of wrong doing amongst all of
us, be careful to judge all of us just because of skin and =
living-place.
I have met black skinned people I should never socialize with, like I
met some white ones. We can never get rid of the attitudes we are =
taught
or braught up with in our family, society. We can try to learn and be
less prejudice. And the "history" of our ancestors can not be =
neglected.
I have to live with the knowledge of the danish =
"slave-trade"-adventure,
the christian church merrits(?) all over, the european colonialisation
in the world, the economical new-colonialism of EU, the racist politics
in Denmark to close our frontiers from pour "strangers". I made a note
about it in my local newspaper in november, when I returned from =
Gambia,
and one dane has allready called my telephone-answer and told me that
I=B4m a "******-lower" and not a "pure white " dane. Maybe it=B4s one =
of my
neighbours, because they are the ones who can see that I sometimes have
"black" friends visiting. So who is who, and who should stay together =
in
the future. Should we form our solidarity-groups based on color, on
countries, or .... ?
Asbj=F8rn Nordam

> ----------
> Fra: Ceesay Soffie[SMTP:Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com]
> Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sendt: 16. december 1997 22:05
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
>=20
> Brother Bernard -=20
>=20
> But, the famous tactic, by the colonialists, of
> pitting brother against brother is still en vogue today.=20
>=20

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 07:35:28 -0500
From: rdinvest@highway1.com
To: Momodou Camara <momodou@inform-bbs.dk>
Cc: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: please remove
Message-ID: <3497C70E.E58ED842@highway1.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



I will be leaving the country for the next 4 months and I would appreciate it if
you could remove me from your news group

Respectfully,

Ron Matheson


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 09:50:58 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Introduction
Message-ID: <199712171450.JAA14442@spruce.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

We welcome you Janko.

Malanding

>
> Sent by "Janko Fofana" <janko.fofana@commit.gm>
> via Commit
>
>
> This is to introduce myself as a new member to the Gambia-L service. I am a
> staff of the department of agriculture in the Gambia and perhaps some of
> you on the list will remember me. I was a student in the United States
> between 1994 to 1996 studying for my Master's degree at Western Illinois
> University.
>
> As a matter of fact, I was in the list during my student days and indeed
> enjoyed the Gambia-L. Now that I am in the Gambia, I hope to again
> contribute to the list and give you some updates on Gambia's development
> efforts especially in the field of agriculture.
>
> My colleagues at the office here; Mr. Sana Jabang and Ramatoulie Sanyang
> are sending their best regards to you. They will love to hear from
> colleagues like Saihou Njai and wife in New Zealand.
>
> So until I start the ball rolling by sending in my first contribution, I
> believe I want to stop here.
>
> Thanks
>
> Janko S.B. Fofana
> Agric. Input Office. Gambia.
>


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 11:07:24 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD62@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Brother Asbjorn -=20

The statement I made which lends itself to the "divide, conquer, then
rule" policy exercised by colonialists, imperialists or any other 'list
there is, is something that people of colour have experienced =
throughout
most of their history after contact with white people. This is
experiential history, not mine not yours. That it is still going on in
some pockets of the world is no mystery. =20

Now, when I say white people, I am not talking about Asbjorn the person
who feels he has more in common with the people he has contact and
dealings with than those he does not - but the LAS CACAS'S (I know I
don't have the spelling of his name right but he was a person of the
church who was telling slave owners to go to Africa and get Africans =
and
leave the Indians alone) of the world.
> But how come that I as a white, western representative often feel =
that
> I have more in common to a black african, than a white european
> neighbour ? How come that I can feel more solidarity with an
> indian-american, than a white-american,
You will have to answer this question, Asbjorn. I will bet that your
having something in common with them has nothing to do with their =
colour
but because of the persons they are and the way you feel has nothing to
do with your being white but the person you are.

> Why do some of you think that there is a "conspiracy" among me and =
my
> friends, towards blacks or africans, the same moment you see our =
skin,
> come to know our names and where we live ?
Where did you get this idea that from? Do you think that their is a
conspiracy amongst people of colour to get back at the white people
because of what they have suffered at their hands? The majority of
people are not paranoid but there is a need to deal with the realities
of our history but what we do with what we know happened is up to us.

> Why do you expect more
> solidarity among blacks all over the world ("we have to stay together
> and not pitty one another because we are black skinned and then
> brothers and sisters") for the reason that such a solidarity should
> exist among the whites ? (that is what you say indirectly, that we,
> because we are white, stay together against other "colors")=20
>=20
This is not what I or any one on this list says. Your sentiment above
may have nothing to do with I wrote and I may be wrong for
interpretation is key.
> If I was
> born in Kerewan, The Gambia, by white parents, named Asbj=F8rn Modou
> Lamin
> Nordam, and later presented me to the Gambia list as Modou Lamin from
> Kerewan. How would you judge my contributions to the list ? From the
> words and opinions I put there, or from my name and birthplace ? =20
>=20
How would you judge Fatou Ceesays contributions from Belgium or Sarjo
Jallow from Germany had they had the same to say as I did on this
subject? Would you assume they were not German/Belgian because of =
their
names? =20

> So
> please all of you, even we can find a lot of wrong doing amongst all
> of
> us, be careful to judge all of us just because of skin and
> living-place.
> I have met black skinned people I should never socialize with, like I
> met some white ones. We can never get rid of the attitudes we are
> taught
> or braught up with in our family, society. We can try to learn and be
> less prejudice. And the "history" of our ancestors can not be
> neglected.
>=20
>=20
I agree with you - but to infer from what I wrote that I or any one =
else
is propagating blacks banding together because of their colour is wrong
and serves no positive purpose.
> Should we form our solidarity-groups based on color, on
> countries, or .... ?
>=20
No! What do you say?
> =20
ps: I could not do much justice to what you wrote because of time
limitations but learning continues -=20

Soffie Ceesay


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 12:04:51 -0600
From: Keretha Cash <kcash@RBVDNR.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: A CHRISTMAS POEM
Message-ID: <81F3CC6EBB6FD011917800805FC17836988E67@panthers.rbvdnr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

This one is rather long but I hope you read it to the end and enjoy it.

Keretha
*************

> 'Twas the night before Christmas and Santa's a wreck...
> How to live in a world that's politically correct?
> His workers no longer would answer to "Elves".
> "Vertically Challenged" they were calling themselves.
> And labor conditions at the north pole
> Were alleged by the union to stifle the soul.
>
> Four reindeer had vanished, without much propriety,
> Released to the wilds by the Humane Society.
> And equal employment had made it quite clear
> That Santa had better not use just reindeer.
> So Dancer and Donner, Comet and Cupid,
> Were replaced with 4 pigs, and you know that looked stupid!
>
> The runners had been removed from his sleigh;
> The ruts were termed dangerous by the E.P.A.
> And people had started to call for the cops
> When they heard sled noises on their roof-tops.
> Second-hand smoke from his pipe had his workers quite frightened.
>
> His fur trimmed red suit was called "Unenlightened."
>
> And to show you the strangeness of life's ebbs and flows,
> Rudolf was suing over unauthorized use of his nose
> And had gone on Geraldo, in front of the nation,
> Demanding millions in over-due compensation.
>
> So, half of the reindeer were gone; and his wife,
> Who suddenly said she'd enough of this life,
> Joined a self-help group, packed, and left in a whiz,
> Demanding from now on her title was Ms.
>
> And as for the gifts, why, he'd ne'er had a notion
> That making a choice could cause so much commotion.
> Nothing of leather, nothing of fur,
> Which meant nothing for him. And nothing for her.
> Nothing that might be construed to pollute.
> Nothing to aim. Nothing to shoot.
> Nothing that clamored or made lots of noise.
> Nothing for just girls. Or just for the boys.
> Nothing that claimed to be gender specific.
> Nothing that's warlike or non-pacific.
>
> No candy or sweets...they were bad for the tooth.
> Nothing that seemed to embellish a truth.
> And fairy tales, while not yet forbidden,
> Were like Ken and Barbie, better off hidden.
> For they raised the hackles of those psychological
> Who claimed the only good gift was one ecological.
>
> No baseball, no football...someone could get hurt;
> Besides, playing sports exposed kids to dirt.
> Dolls were said to be sexist, and should be passe;
> And Nintendo would rot your entire brain away.
>
> So Santa just stood there, disheveled, perplexed;
> He just could not figure out what to do next.
> He tried to be merry, tried to be gay,
> But you've got to be careful with that word today.
> His sack was quite empty, limp to the ground;
> Nothing fully acceptable was to be found.
>
> Something special was needed, a gift that he might
> Give to all without angering the left or the right.
> A gift that would satisfy, with no indecision,
> Each group of people, every religion;
> Every ethnicity, every hue,
> Everyone, everywhere...even you.
> So here is that gift, it's price beyond worth...
> "May you and your loved ones enjoy peace on earth."
>
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 18:19:02 -0000
From: "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <B0000025832@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Sent by "Torstein Grotnes" <tgr@commit.gm>
via Commit


Well said, Asbjorn.
Color should soon go out of fashion, and stay out.

Torstein
The Gambia

----------
From: "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Date: 17. desember 1997 12:20

Ceesay Soffie, you are maybe right. But how come that I as a white,
western representative often feel that I have more in common to a black
african, than a white european neighbour ?.....


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 15:27:17 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712172027.AA36586@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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Ya Soffie, here is Bernard's response to your message. BTW, that was a
wonderful response you gave.

Thanks.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
-----------------------------

MOE'

COULD YOU SEND THIS TO SOFFIE FOR ME?

THANKS, MORE LATER

BERNARD
----------------------------
> Brother Bernard -
>
> The reverse could be said that African Americans do not care about
> continental Africans because their ancestors' actions contributed to
> your being here. But, the famous tactic, by the colonialists, of
> pitting brother against brother is still en vogue today. By the by,
> what is your friend's basis for the statement he made?

WE DIALOG IN THAT MANNER ALL OF THE TIME. WE ARE BOTH
33 YEARS OLD, AND WE ARE SO DIFFERENT THAT WE FIND OURSELVES
CURIOUS OF EACH OTHER. I AM DEMOCRAT, HE IS REPUBLICAN,
I AM MUSLIM, HE IS AN ATHEIST, ETC.
WE USE SUCH DIALOG TO LEARN MORE
ABOUT THE OTHER PERSON AND THE OTHER PERSON'S
CULTURE, HISTORY,ECT. ALSO, I AM MUSLIM. I SUSPECTS
HE IS CURIOUS AS TO ISLAM FOR ALL HE KNOWS OF ISLAM
IS WHAT THE MEDIA TELLS HIM OF THE HONORABLE LOUIS
FARRAKAHN AND THE NATION OF ISLAM.

> I once worked with a brother who wanted to go the Africa (I suggested he
> go to Gambia or one of the countries for Africa is soo big) because he
> wanted to know how it felt to go around bare-foot, living in a tree and
> all sorts of other nonsense - I don't have to wonder where he got the
> notion that people in Africa live in trees.

I AGREE SISTER, I SUSPECT HE LIKELY GREW UP IN A TREE.
HE COULD TRAVEL TO MY HOME IN GREEN COUNTY ALABAMA
IF HE WANTS TO KNOW WHAT IT IS LIKE TO RUN AROUND BAREFOOT.
AS A CHILD, I COULD NOT WAIT UNTIL SUMMER SO THAT I COULD
GO BAREFOOT. I ENJOYED IT, AND I WOULD NOT CHANGE IT FOR THE
WORLD. I HOPE MY CHILDREN ARE AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY.

> That some Africans think
> some African Americans could be better off than they are but don't want
> to because they are lazy is not an original thought - I don't have to
> wonder from where they got that notion.

MMM??? INTERESTING, I KNEW THAT WHITE AMERICANS
HELD THESE NOTIONS, YET IT IS NEW TO ME THAT AFRICANS
WOULD HARBOR SUCH VIEWS ALSO. NOW, I SUSPECT FAR
MORE CONTINENTAL AFRICANS KNOW THE OPPOSITE THAN
SHARE THE FORMER.....YET, LET ME ADD THAT THERE IS
SOME TRUTH TO THE FORMER. I KNOW "LAZY" AFRICAN AMERICANS
AND I KNOW LAZY AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILIES. THEY ARE A VERY
VERY VERY SMALL MINORITY. YET, THEY EXIST. LIKELY THEY HAVE
COUNTERPARTS IN OTHER RACES, AND OTHER COUNTRIES THAT
PARALLEL THEIR TRIFLING EXISTENCE. YET ALSO, NOT TO
MAKE AN EXCUSE, YET IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SLAVERY OR
THE AFTER EFFECTS OF SLAVERY DID DEFLATE A PERSON
SENSE OF SELF WORTH THEREBY CONTRIBUTING TO THAT
TRIFLENESS. ALSO, THE AMERICAN "WELFARE" STATE RE-
ENFORCES THAT LACK OF MOTIVATION. "WHY WORK IF
THE STATE IS GOING TO GIVE YOU A CHECK?"

> Also, if brother Moe is your friend, how do you relate to each other; do
> you sense that he does not care for and about you because you are
> American? I don't think so.

YOU ARE CORRECT. YET UNDERSTAND, MOE IS ONLY ONE PERSON
HE CAN NOT SPEAK FOR AFRICA. MORE WHAT I AM ASKING
AND REFERRING TO IS "WHY HAVE THE DESCENDANTS OF THE
KIDNAPPED AFRICANS NOT BEEN WELCOMED BACK TO AFRICA
FOR TOURISM OR FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE?'

IF YOU WERE TO ASK AN AFRICAN AMERICAN WHICH CITY WOULD
HE LIKE TO VISIT ABROAD, 97 PERCENT WOULD SITE A CITY NOT
LOCATED IN AFRICA. IN SHORT, AFRICAN AMERICAN DO NOT
CARE TO VISIT AFRICA. I BELIEVE THE REASON FOR SUCH
IGNORANCE IS DUE TO WE, IN ALL OF OUR IGNORANCE ARE
AFRAID TO VISIT AFRICA. YET, IF NELSON MANDELA, OR
CHARLES TAYLOR, OR SOME OTHER PERSON THAT HAS THE
POWER TO SAY "THIS IS YOUR HOME" AND WE APOLOGIZE TO
YOUR FOREFATHERS FOR THE BETRAYAL THAT LED TO
YOUR EXISTENCE IN NORTH AMERICA.......WE APOLOGIZE FOR
NOT KILLING THOSE AFRICANS THAT PARTICIPATED IN THE
SLAVE TRADE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR NOT CHOOSING TO FIGHT AND
DIE WITH DIGNITY TO DEFEND OUR BROTHERS AND MOTHERS
AND SISTERS....

WHY HAS AFRICA NOT REACHED ITS HAND TO US???

> Yes, you have an answer for your co-worker
> - give yourself time before responding. There is a bridge to be gapped
> between continental and American Africans, no doubt. It will take each
> of us on our individual dealings to be REAL and find out about each
> other ONE-ON-ONE then the big picture will emerge.

I AM WITH YOU SISTER. I JUST GET FRUSTRATED. IT HAS BEEN
400 YEARS AND WE ARE NO CLOSER TO COMING TOGETHER
THAT WE WERE 100 AGO....IT SOMETIME DEPRESSES ME.

> Soffie






------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 17:39:39 -0500
From: habib <hghanim@erols.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <349854AB.4AE3@erols.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Ceesay Soffie wrote:
>
> Brother Asbjorn -
>
> The statement I made which lends itself to the "divide, conquer, then
> rule" policy exercised by colonialists, imperialists or any other 'list
> there is, is something that people of colour have experienced throughout
> most of their history after contact with white people. This is
> experiential history, not mine not yours. That it is still going on in
> some pockets of the world is no mystery.
>
> Now, when I say white people, I am not talking about Asbjorn the person
> who feels he has more in common with the people he has contact and
> dealings with than those he does not - but the LAS CACAS'S (I know I
> don't have the spelling of his name right but he was a person of the
> church who was telling slave owners to go to Africa and get Africans and
> leave the Indians alone) of the world.
> > But how come that I as a white, western representative often feel that
> > I have more in common to a black african, than a white european
> > neighbour ? How come that I can feel more solidarity with an
> > indian-american, than a white-american,
> You will have to answer this question, Asbjorn. I will bet that your
> having something in common with them has nothing to do with their colour
> but because of the persons they are and the way you feel has nothing to
> do with your being white but the person you are.
>
> > Why do some of you think that there is a "conspiracy" among me and my
> > friends, towards blacks or africans, the same moment you see our skin,
> > come to know our names and where we live ?
> Where did you get this idea that from? Do you think that their is a
> conspiracy amongst people of colour to get back at the white people
> because of what they have suffered at their hands? The majority of
> people are not paranoid but there is a need to deal with the realities
> of our history but what we do with what we know happened is up to us.
>
> > Why do you expect more
> > solidarity among blacks all over the world ("we have to stay together
> > and not pitty one another because we are black skinned and then
> > brothers and sisters") for the reason that such a solidarity should
> > exist among the whites ? (that is what you say indirectly, that we,
> > because we are white, stay together against other "colors")
> >
> This is not what I or any one on this list says. Your sentiment above
> may have nothing to do with I wrote and I may be wrong for
> interpretation is key.
> > If I was
> > born in Kerewan, The Gambia, by white parents, named Asbjrn Modou
> > Lamin
> > Nordam, and later presented me to the Gambia list as Modou Lamin from
> > Kerewan. How would you judge my contributions to the list ? From the
> > words and opinions I put there, or from my name and birthplace ?
> >
> How would you judge Fatou Ceesays contributions from Belgium or Sarjo
> Jallow from Germany had they had the same to say as I did on this
> subject? Would you assume they were not German/Belgian because of their
> names?
>
> > So
> > please all of you, even we can find a lot of wrong doing amongst all
> > of
> > us, be careful to judge all of us just because of skin and
> > living-place.
> > I have met black skinned people I should never socialize with, like I
> > met some white ones. We can never get rid of the attitudes we are
> > taught
> > or braught up with in our family, society. We can try to learn and be
> > less prejudice. And the "history" of our ancestors can not be
> > neglected.
> >
> >
> I agree with you - but to infer from what I wrote that I or any one else
> is propagating blacks banding together because of their colour is wrong
> and serves no positive purpose.
> > Should we form our solidarity-groups based on color, on
> > countries, or .... ?
> >
> No! What do you say?
> >
> ps: I could not do much justice to what you wrote because of time
> limitations but learning continues -
>
> Soffie Ceesay

Ya Soffie I say NO also to the last question based on religiuos grounds.
I am a muslim first , then my nationality , then my colour or creed.
The only difference or seperation in my opinion is in the mind.
Imagine us all being blind and communicate by talking only. how can you
tell someone's color if you are not told but you can tell someone's
belief/or religion and that's the point I am trying to make.
Keep up the clear and plain level discussions on, Soffie
Habib
--
MZ

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 1997 20:47:53 EST
From: BAKSAWA <BAKSAWA@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Introduction
Message-ID: <26d770e2.349880cb@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit


Mr. Fofana:

In your introduction, you mentioned a gentleman by the name of Sana Jabang.
Is it the same person who worked in the Agricultural Unit at ActionAid The
Gambia? If so, please extend my greetings to him - he was my office mate.

Peace!

Awa Sey

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 00:16:48 -0500
From: M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <3498B1C0.9349F030@mindspring.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Gambia-L'ers,

I would like to thank sister Soffie Ceesay, for the extremely well thought out
response to the question of discrimination which was originally aired by
Bernard, through Moe Jallow. Sister Soffie has done an exceptional job in a
few well chosen paragraphs. You are to commended for your precision.
However, following some of the later comments, I would like to revisit the
topic.

One of the reasons which I believe this topic causes so much confusion, has
actually been touched upon by various people on the list, in a number of
ways. The point to be made is that no people, whether European,
Euro-American, African, African-American, or whom have you, are monolithic.
(This is a point which Mr. Torstein has pushed beyond the limit in another
context.) That is to say, that there is a divergence of perspectives and
views within each national, cultural, religious, racial, or political group.

Thus, there are those African-Americans and Africans of the continent who have
recognized the historic, cultural, social, and political connections between
us, and extend open arms to embrace one another as kin separated by great
distance in space and time. The middle passage, was a period in history which
forcibly separated families and caused a social, intellectual, and political
schism in African society, which has had a tremendous impact upon all sides of
the Atlantic which last until this very day. This is why there are a number
of us who feel this bond, more strongly than between other people.

However, there are those African Americans who, even in the late 1990's, have
no identification with, nor love for Africans of the continent. Mr. Pa Musa
Jallow's unfortunate experiences at Florida A&M, during the 1980s testifies to
this uninformed view point. Likewise, there are those Africans of the
continent who have neither love for nor identify with African-Americans. I
have experiences similar to PMJ's during my almost four years in Nigeria,
largely at one of the major University's there, where administrators asked me
who I was, why was I there, and that I should get out, and go back to where I
came from as they threw my documents in my face. (Not an easy pill to
swallow, but a position based in ignorance and arrogance, which only gave me
the strength to persevere) This is to say, that it is true, that there are
some family members who do not feel the bond of kinship with as much fervor
and who would do what they could for others outside of the kinship, while
neglecting family members. Mr. Pa Musa Jallow's unfortunate experiences
clearly attests to this condition, as do my own experiences in a Nigerian
University during the same time period. This also speaks to the issue raised
some time ago by Mr. Jallow, when he wrote about the "Crabs in the Barrel
Syndrome" which unfortunately characterizes some groups of people within our
community (although certainly not all, as the somber tone of the Mr. Jallow's
article might suggest.) There is diversity within the family. This is one of
the legacies of slavery and colonialism, which subsequently has been
perpetuated by the very people who do not profit from it!

However, to say that the seeds for this distrust between, the extended family
members have not been sown by those Europeans of ill will would be
inaccurate. It happens up to the present time and happens between the various
branches of our family tree. So for instance, the mistrust is fostered
between the Caribbean and the African-American communities; between the
African and the African-American communities; and the Caribbean and African
communities; as negative stereotypes are projected about the supposed
"other". Whether fortunately or unfortunately, I have encountered this on
numerous occasions in my life time, when (what I, up-to then, considered to
be), well meaning and friendly White folks - European-Americans cautioned me
to be careful about associating (at differing times) with either the
African-American community, the Caribbean community, or the African community,
"because they are not like you and your people." Now, the interesting part of
this is that I was born in the U.S., with a heritage which survived slavery in
the rice and sugar plantation states, as well as having a heritage from the
Caribbean, which similarly survived slavery in the sugar plantation provinces
there! So, that the people whom others would steer me clear of, were
ultimately a people from whom I directly trace my roots!

Additionally, in 1974 my our family hosted Temu, a Chagga from Tanzania
studying accounting in U.K., who visited the States for the first time. In
one of our conversations, he made it clear that he was told, by one of the
sponsors (who was White) of the group of Tanzanians two things. First, that
they should not associate with the "Negroes in America" as they are a
dangerous group of people. Second, those who were going to New York City,
should under no circumstances travel to Harlem, as this was the center of the
Negro killing grounds. To make a long story a little shorter, our brother
Temu by name, stayed with us, (violating his first caution). After arriving
in New York City, the first thing he wanted to do was to go to Harlem, where
he was extremely elated to see large groups of Black people, many of whom had
faces that he was familiar with, interacting and carrying on daily business
with no overtly ill effects. (This violated his second caution.) The
cautions which had been issued, apparently were false. This posed a number of
questions which needed to be addressed. Who among the Tanzanians accepted the
cautions about "Negroes in America" at face value and walked away from their
experiences irreversibly tainted with negative images of African Americans,
and were later in positions to influence others about their "experiences" and
the realities of life in the United States? What else was conveyed that was
also false? What was the purpose of this false information? And last, who
benefitted from this type of disinformation?

In response to Mr. Habib, I would say there is no need to artificially
contrive a situation where we were blind. This forum affords us the same type
of situation which you are suggesting might serve as a point. However, issues
of gender, religion, ethnicity, nationality, and color all appear again and
again suggesting their relative importance to people on the list. I would
suggest that one's genetic legacy is indelible. One is born with some degree
of melanin. Religion is something one grows into, and is taught. Individuals
may change that if they see a different spiritual light. Similarly, although
one is born within a specific country, and is automatically assigned some
nationality; this can also be changed if one so desires. However, color and
genetics cannot be changed so radically, unless, of course, one's name is
Michael Jackson. (Sorry, for that one, I couldn't resist it.) All of these
issues become evident in conversation, however the color issue is the only
one, which is immediately apparent the very instant we meet. This we can
react to, if we are predisposed to do so.

Finally, back to the original topic. To answer Bernard, all of these examples
were meant to illustrate, that there are a variety of different views held by
Africans concerning African Americans, just as there are a variety of
different views held by African Americans concerning continental Africans.
However, much of the views need to be thoroughly explored, for they are
sometimes based in a contrived myth, which superficially serves to keep kith
and kin separated, as I believe is strongly implied by Sister Soffie Ceesay's
initial response. In this light, one great value of Gambia-L becomes
evident. The discussion group can serve as a valuable vehicle to have
constructive discussion and dialogue, which has the potential to tear down the
walls that artificially separate us, forestalling our political, economic, and
social growth. As such, one of the expressions of the sixties is appropriate
here. "Each one, teach one" for those who know are obligated to teach those
who do not!

Thank you and may you all have a good day.


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 17 Dec 97 22:31:59 PST
From: "RASTAFARI IS HIS NAME...JAH..GIVE THANKS & PRAISES" <ABARROW@rr5.rr.intel.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: introduction
Message-ID: <9712180631.utk15119@RR5.intel.com>

Ten Boy,

Welcome to the electronic Bantanba....I hope all is going good with you and
your family!!!

Looking forward to your contributions.

Pa-Abdou

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 02:16:34 EST
From: MJawara <MJawara@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Christmas Eve Jam
Message-ID: <44faa433.3498cdd5@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

The Gambian Support Group cordially invites you to a Christmas eve bash at the
Marriott Hotel in Gaithersburg, Maryland.
Featuring D.J. MOZE and the TANGLE VIBES PRODUCTION ; Complimentary Hors
d'oeuvres in the executive foyer.

TIME : 10 pm - 4 am
COVER CHARGE : $10 B4 11pm and $15 thereafter...
Proper Attire Required.
******************************************************************************
********************
Gambian Support Group sweat shirts will be sold at the party for $25.00 each.
Available Colors : Navy blue, Black, White, Ash.
Available Sizes : X large, XX large.
Limited number of T ' Shirts for $10 each.
******************************************************************************
********************
DIRECTIONS :- Take I - 495 West to 270 North.Take Exit 9B to Sam Eig Highway
West.Then turn left onto fields road and left again
onto Rio Blvd;
which becomes Washington Blvd.Pass the Rio
Entertainment
Complex and left into the Hotel entrance.

Musa K. Jawara.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 02:31:30 PST
From: "Babou Njie" <babounjie@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: unlist
Message-ID: <199712181031.CAA11383@f131.hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain




Hi list managers, can you please unlist me because I'ill be away
over the christmas holidays.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 11:29:04 +0100
From: "Housainou Taal"<Housainou.Taal@wfp.org>
To: gambia-L@u.washington.edu
Subject: Gambia Educational Support Plan-final call for comments
Message-ID: <C1256570.005B675D.00@wfp.org>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII





Dear Gambia-L readers,

I would like to thank those who organised this forum for us to exchange
views on our country. I would also like to thank those who put together
the draft Gambia Educational Support Plan. I have the following comments:

(1) As many of us are aware, the illiteracy rate in The Gambia is one of
the highest in the world and is even worse in rural areas; therefore,
support to primary education or even non-formal education could reach a
large number of Gambians at less cost. There is evidence in the education
literature that returns to every dollar spent on primary education is
higher than investing in higher levels of education. Thus I am in favour of
supporting a much higher number of primary school students and non-formal
education if possible.

(2) Nonetheless, I am also in support of investing in high schools and
Gambia College in particular. However, I was a bit worried about the
proposed mode of assisting Gambia College through member contribution of
books. Although this is a noble idea, it may not be the most efficient.
Why? Well the books donated may not be those needed by the students and
faculty and given the very limited resources available perhaps a book fund
could be more optimal. Members could contribute money to this fund and the
fund managers could then discuss with Gambia College to purchase the most
relevant books for the college.

(3) Third, just reading the messages on Gambia-1, I realised we have a
very diverse pool of talented Gambians all over the world and perhaps we
should explore a medium for such folks to go back to The Gambia for a
limited period to contribute their expertise. For example, Dr Nyang has
amassed a lot of knowlege on African (and Gambian ofcourse) history and how
about organising a three-month Visiting Scholar Programme at Gambia College
or other appropriate institutions for him to organise seminars/lectures for
students and Gambian practitoners as well. Should Gambian history be
re-written by such such scholars along the lines of the seminal work of
Chiekh Anta Diop or Basil Davidson?

(4) How about a good photocopier for the Gambia College Library? I
remember as an undergraduate student at UC- Berkeley our lecturers used
to prepare a reader with articles photocopied from various sources which we
purchased at low cost.

Thanks and regards,

Housainou Taal
Programme coordinator,
UN World Food Programme,
Rome, ITALY




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 97 03:09:29 PST
From: "RASTAFARI IS HIS NAME...JAH..GIVE THANKS & PRAISES" <ABARROW@rr5.rr.intel.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Unsubscribe
Message-ID: <9712181109.utk20002@RR5.intel.com>

List Managers,

I would appreciate it if you could temporary remove me from the mailing list...
I will be on vacation and will not have access to my mail for the next two
weeks...and I would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone on the list
happy holidays.

Thanks for all your efforts.

Later,

Pa-Abdou Barrow

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 13:27:17 +0100
From: Fatou Khan <mec97a14@tron.lyngbyes.dk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:christmas Holidays
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19971218132717.007bb9f0@nt2.lyngbyes.dk>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

HEY,
WILL YOU PLEASE UNSUBSCRIBE ME FORM THE 19TH OF DEC TO THE 5TH OF JAN. I
AM GOING ON VACATION.
THANK YOU.
FATOU KHAN

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 09:50:33 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discriminatiion (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712181450.AA40918@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hi folks,

Thank you to all those who responded to the subject 'Re: Racial
Discrimination'. You provided some very interesting and eye-opening
arguments and opinions. I hope we call learn from this.

Thank you.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

===================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 09:59:22 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: The Intellectual Prostitutes (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712181459.AA35674@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hi folks,

Does anyone know the author George Ayittey? I came accross this
interesting article today, entitled 'The Intellectual Prostitutes'. It is
a column that was published by New African (October, 1996; p.35). I also
heard that Mr. Ayittey authored a very interesting and provocative book
entitled " Africa Betrayed" published in 1992 by St. Martin's Press,
NewYork.

In his article below, you might contradict or disagree with Mr. Ayittey's
analogies but you might also see what angle he was looking from. It's a
rather long article but I hope you will enjoy reading through.

Thank you.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
_______________________

> : Title: The Intellectual Prostitutes
> : Author: George B.N. Ayittey
> :
> : When Captain Yahya Jammeh overthrew the democratically-elected
> : government of Sir Dawda Jawara on July 24, 1994, the only minister from
> : the Jawara administration enticed to serve the military regime was the
> : finance minister, Bakary Darbo, a very well respected economist -- even
> : in international circles. He was instrumental in getting the World Bank
> : to resume some aid to The Gambia. On Oct 10, 1994, he was fired by the
> : military junta: He was no longer useful to them. Then on Nov 15, Capt.
> : Jammeh accused him of complicity in the Nov. 11 abortive coup attempt.
> : He fled to neighboring Senegal with his family.
> :
> : Next to assume the finance ministry portofolio was Ousman Koro Ceesay.
> : When he too became no longer useful to the military junta, "they smashed
> : his head with a baseball bat," said Capt. Ebou Jallow, the No.2 man in
> : the ruling council who defected to the U.S. on Oct 15, 1995. They then
> : riddled his body with bullets, dragged him into his official car, drove
> : it to the outskirts of the city and set it ablaze.
> :
> : So many of Africa's intellectuals -- some with Ph.D.s and who ought to
> : have known better -- sold out their conscience, integrity and principles
> : to serve the dictates of military despots with half their intelligence.
> : The allure of a Mercedes Benz, a diplomatic posting, a ministerial post
> : and a government mansion often proved too irresistible. So hordes of
> : highly "educated" African intellectuals sold themselves off into
> : voluntary bondage and accorded heinous military regimes the legitimacy
> : and respectability they craved. Even Idi Amin always found intellectual
> : prostitutes to bed with. Then after being raped and defiled, they were
> : discarded.
> :
> : Another was Abass Bundu of Sierra Leone -- the former secretary-general
> : of ECOWAS. When the 29-year old illiterate Capt. Valentine Strasser
> : appointed him foreign minister through a radio announcement, he left in
> : a cloud of dust. Chickens flew out of his way, nursing mothers grabbed
> : their babies or risk being run over. In August 1995, he was tossed into
> : a garbage bin in a radio announcement.
> :
> : We just discovered that he's an opportunist and one cannot trust such
> : people. So we kicked him out," said spokeman of the Strasser's National
> : Provisional Ruling Council. "When we appointed Abass Bundu through a
> : radio announcement, he didn't complain but when we fired him though
> : another radio announcement, he wants to make noise," he added (The
> : African Observer, Aug 8-21, 1995; p.5).
> :
> : A more recent case was that of Sierra Leone's fearless human rights
> : lawyer, Sulaiman Banja Tejan-Sie. He was a vociferous critic of the
> : ruling NPRC over human rights abuses and was reported to have a personal
> : dislike for the military. He was hailed on student campuses as a young
> : radical barrister and was invited to student conventions, giving
> : lectures on human rights and negative consequences of military rule. On
> : several occasions, he called for a national conference to prepare the
> : way for civilian rule. Then suddenly in April 1995, he joined Sierra
> : Leone's military-led government as Secretary of State in the Department
> : of
> : Youth, Sport and Social Mobilization. His detractors never forgave him.
> :
> : There is Paul Kamara -- a fearless crusader of human rights and ardent
> : advocate of democracy. He published and edited the widely-respected
> : paper, For Di People, whose circulation exceeded 30,000 copies a week.
> : In Jan 1996, he joined the government of Brig-Gen Maada Bio -- a
> : decision which by his own admission "disappointed many people." On
> : election night (Feb 26), five men dressed in military fatigues with guns
> : waited for him at his newspaper offices, in midnight-green Mercedes
> : Benz. When he left his office and got into his official four-wheel drive
> : car, the soldiers chased him and opened fire. "We've got the bastard at
> : last," one of them said. But he escaped death and is now recuperating in
> : London.
> :
> : In Nigeria, there is Baba Gana Kingibe, a career diplomat who was the
> : vice-presidential candidate of Moshood K.O. Abiola. He accepted the post
> : of foreign minister from the same military regime which annulled the
> : elections that he and Abiola won. He did not raise a whiff of protest or
> : resign when his running mate, Abiola, was thrown into jail. Neither did
> : Chief Tony Anenih, the chairman of the defunct Social Democratic Party,
> : on whose ticket Chief M.K.O. Abiola contested the June 12 election. In
> : fact, Chief Anenih was part of a five-man delegation, sent by Gen.
> : Abacha to the U.S. in Oct, 1995, to "educate and seek the support of
> : Nigerians about the transition program." At an Oct 22, 1995 forum
> : organized by the Schiller Institute in Washington, "Chief Anenih and
> : Col. (rtd) Emeka O. Ojukwu, took turns ripping apart the reputation of
> : Abiola . . . Anenih took pains to discredit Chief Abiola, whom he said
> : was being presented by
> : the western media as the victimized President-elect . . . Some of the
> : Nigerians in the audience denounced the delegation as `paid stooges' of
> : Abacha" (African News Weekly, Nov 3, 1995; p.3).
> :
> : More pathetic was the case of Mr. Alex Ibru, the publisher of The
> : Guardian, who became the Internal Affairs minister. Then on Aug 14,
> : 1994, his own newspaper was raided and shut down by the same military
> : government under which he was serving. He did not protest or resign.
> : After six months as interior minister, he too was tossed aside. In
> : October 1995, his newspapers, shut down by the military government for
> : more than a year, were allowed to reopen after Ibru apologized to the
> : authorities for any offensive reports they may have carried. Then on Feb
> : 2, 1996, unidentified gunmen in a deep blue Peugeot 504 trailed him and
> : sprayed his car with machine-gun fire. The editor-in-chief, Femi Kusa,
> : said that the car was bullet-ridden and Ibru was injured in many parts
> : of the body. He was also flown to Britain for treatment.
> :
> : Remember Ernest Shonekan, whose 89-day interim government was overthrown
> : by Gen. Abacha? Well, on Sept 19, 1995, he accompanied Nigeria's Foreign
> : Minister, Tom Ikimi, to deliver a "confidential message" to British
> : Prime Minister John Major in London. Nigeria's military junta told
> : Westminster that it will pardon the 40 convicted coup plotters if
> : British would help with the rescheduling Nigeria's $35 billion debt,
> : support its transition program to democractic rule, its bid for a
> : permanent seat on the U.N. Security Council, and U.S. recognition of its
> : effort to fight drug trafficking.
> :
> : First of all, how in hell could Ernest Shonekan act as an emissary for
> : the same barbarous military regime that overthrew him? How, how, how?
> : Second, who thought that 35 years after "independence" from British
> : colonial rule, Nigeria's government would be holding its own citizens as
> : hostages, demanding ransom from the former colonial power? Of course,
> : none of the "educated" emissaries recognized that their mission sank
> : the concept of "independence from colonial rule" to new depths of
> : depravity.
> :
> : In a letter to The Ghanaian Stateman (June 28 - July 11, 1994), Kwaku
> : Obeng wrote:
> : """Some of the intellectuals of the NDC are unprincipled
> : opportunists who have betrayed scholarship. For example, how can a
> : personality like Harry Sawyerr (minister of education in
> : military-turned
> : civilian Rawlings regime) tell the whole world that nobody can stop
> : them from celebrating the day he was violently and unconstitutionally
> : removed from office? Again, how can one understand an intellectual
> : like Totobi Quakyi, who was at the forefront of students' struggle
> : against the late Acheampong's (military) dictatorship only to turn
> : round to resolutely defend a similar system?""""" (p.4).
> :
> : Says Ismail Rashid, a Sierra Leonian exile in Canada:
> :
> : """"We should not forget the opportunism, cowardice and unprincipled
> : role of a section of the so-called intelligentsia in leading us into
> : our present quandary. Lawyers, doctors, professors and a whole
> : host of
> : other "educated" people willingly participated in the general
> : repression and corruption that was characteristic of APC (All
> : People's
> : Congress) rule . . . In 1980 and 1985, this elite remained muted and
> : in some cases condemned the widespread protests against the APC
> : dictatorship and the deteriorating economy by workers and students. In
> : fact, it endorsed the punitive measures taken against these
> : protestors. A classic representative of this class is the present Vice
> : President, Dr. Abdullai Conteh (remember this name), who came to power
> : on the crest of student protest in 1977, and who criticized President
> : Momoh's succession to power as the work of an insidious "cabal
> : which
> : will only destroy the nation." Needless to say, Dr. Conteh ended in
> : that same cabal as a leading actor.
> : Finally, the nation cannot forget the opportunism and cowardice
> : of the SLPP (Sierra Leone People's Party). After the death of so many
> : people in the 1977 elections to ensure that the SLPP had a voice
> : in parliament, its leading members, including its present chairman
> : Salia Jusu-Sheriff, crossed over to the APC. For over 13 years, they
> : also partook in the rape of the country"""(New African, May 1992,
> : p.10).
> :
> : Vile opportunism, unflappable sycophancy and trenchant collaboration
> : allowed tyranny to become entrenched in Africa. Doe, Mengistu, Mobutu,
> : and other military dictators legitimized and perpetuated their rule by
> : buying off and co-opting Africa's academics for a pittance. Says Ebow
> : Annobil in The Ghanaian Voice (June 14-18, 1995):
> :
> : """"Lawyers who ought to know better are foolishly aiding, abetting
> : and supporting the crimes of Rawlings. Intellectuals who should be
> : teaching Rawlings have become STUDENTS to him. Chiefs who are far older
> : to Rawlings have been kneeling before Rawlings in the Castle for
> : favours and "Holland Schnapps." Pastors of some Pentecostal Churches
> : have become informants, servants and liars to Rawlings"""" (p.6).
> :
> : When they fall out of favor, they are beaten up, tossed aside or worse.
> : About 200 former ministers of Comrade Haile Mariam Mengistu's government
> : are crammed in Ethiopian jails. "Over 80 percent of Rwanda's 700 judges
> : and magistrates, many of them guilty themselves of the genocide, died or
> : fled in the 1994 fighting" (The Economist, March 23, 1996; p.37). And
> : not all those who flee have an easy time in exile.
> :
> : "Former Vice President in the deposed Momoh regime, Dr. Abudulai Conteh
> : has been deported from Britain, following a failed attempt by his
> : lawyers to convince the UK authorities that Conteh was a genuine refugee
> : . . . The British High Court Judge, Mr. Simon Brown agreed with the Home
> : Office that Conteh should bear some responsibility for the corruption of
> : the Momoh government which played a major role in bankrupting Sierra
> : Leone" (West Africa, Aug 31 - Sept 6, 1992; p. 1496).
> :
> : Cameroon refused political asylum to four Rwandan Hutu officials accused
> : of having played a significant role in the genocide there in 1994. One
> : of them was Ferdinand Nahimana, former director of the state information
> : office and a founder of Radio Mille Collines, the Kigali radio station
> : who inflammatory broadcasts egged on Hutu soldiers and ethnic militia to
> : kill Tutsis. The others are Justin Mugenzi, president of the Liberal
> : Party and former trade and industry ministry, Joseph Nzirorera, former
> : interim president of the National Assembly and head of late president
> : Juvenal Habyarimana's National Republican Movement for Democracy and
> : Development (MRND) party, and Pasteur Musabe, former director of
> : Rwanda's National Bank. And what happened to all those intellectuals who
> : scrambled to take up ministerial positions in Samuel Doe's regime? Do
> : Africa's intellectuals learn? Never! Why the obsession with government
> : posts?
> :
> : Because in Africa, government is the vehicle we use, not to serve but to
> : fleece the people. Ever noticed that the richest men in Africa are often
> : heads of state and ministers? So every "educated" nut-head wants to be
> : president or minister -- not because he wants to serve the people but to
> : enrich himself.
> :
> : The ever-consuming desire of the "educated" African is to secure that
> : top government post. Once attained, he would then use that office to
> : amass a personal fortune by embezzling public funds, taking bribes and
> : commissions on government contracts. Political power in Africa is the
> : passport to great personal fortune. It guarantees access to fabulous
> : wealth. Now you understand the phrase: "Seek ye first the political
> : kingdom . . . " When he seizes the presidency, not even a bulldozer can
> : pry him off. And when he plunders the state too, the stupid ***** salts
> : it away overseas to develop other peoples' countries! "According to one
> : United Nations estimate, $200 billion or 90 percent of the Sub-Saharan
> : part of the continent's gross domestic product (much of it illicitly
> : earned), was shipped to foreign banks in 1991 alone (The New York
> : Times, Feb 4, 1996; p.4). That flight of capital could have wiped out
> : more than half of Africa's $390 billion foreign debt!
> :
> : The day African elites use their brains and the skills they acquired
> : through "education" and military training to seek their wealth in the
> : private sector, by actually producing something, even charcoal, Mother
> : Africa will write a better report card and become a continent of
> : producers, instead of consumers importing everything. But that's not
> : likely anytime soon. The jostling for the presidency and ministerial
> : appointments as well as the use of the gun for plunder will continue,
> : degenerating into senseless civil war, wanton destruction and savage
> : carnage.
> :
> : But if the military doesn't get them, the people will. Angry Africans
> : have vowed to punish the traitors, sycophants, leeches and intellectual
> : collaborators. In Nigeria, Zaire and several African countries, their
> : houses and cars were burned down. In Senegal, after President Diouf's
> : ruling Socialist Party "won" a huge majority in parliamentary elections
> : in Feb 1993, violence broke out amid charges of vote rigging and Babacar
> : Seye, the vice-president of Senegal's Constitutional Council, was
> : killed.
> :
> : According to African News Weekly (June 4, 1993):
> :
> : """Seye was found dead in his car, apparently the victim of an
> : ambush,
> : investigators said. According to the independent, Sud Quotidien, a
> : group calling itself the "People's Army" claimed responsibility for
> : Seye's murder, the first political assassination in Senegal's
> : history.
> : Sud Quotidien said an anynomous caller telephoned the paper to
> : say the People's Army carried out the attack. "This is a warning
> : for the
> : other judges in the Constitutional Council, so they really respect the
> : people's will," it quoted the caller as saying." [Seye's killer
> : was never found.]
> :
> : In Ghana, Kwabena Kofi of Tema has warned omniously:
> :
> : """I would like to remind Messrs. E.T. Mensah, Prof. Awoonor, Obed
> : Asamoah, Harry Sawyerr and others, that if the unexpected happens as
> : a result of their sycophancy, they and their families would be the
> : first to bear the anger of Ghanaians"""" (Free Press, April
> : 10-16, 1996; p.2).
> :
> : Whatever happens to them, shed no tears for Africa's intellectual
> : prostitutes.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 10:25:17 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Poem: The Cold Within
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD63@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

'T is the season for giving and I found this poem again and thought we
could share it again. Christmas is here and Ramadhan is right around
the corner and in the spirit of these two, let's light up the fires
within


> THE COLD WITHIN
>
> Six humans trapped by circumstances, in bleak and bitter cold.
> Each one possessed a stick of wood, or so the story told.
> Their dying fire in need of logs, the first man held his back,
> for, of the faces around the fire, he noticed one man black.
> The next man looking across the way, saw one not of his church,
> and couldn't bring himself to give the fire his stick of birch.
> The third one sat in tattered clothes he gave his coat a hitch.
> Why should his log be put to use, to warm the idle rich?
> The rich man just sat back and thought of the wealth he had in store,
> and how to keep what he had earned from the lazy, shiftless poor.
> The black man's face bespoke revenge as the fire passed from his
> sight,
> for all he saw in his stick of wood, was a chance to spite the white.
> The last man of this forlorn group did naught except for gain, giving
> only to those who gave, was how he played the game.
> Their logs held tight in death's still hand, was proof of human sin.
> They didn't die from the cold without, they died from the cold within.
>
>
> _____________________________
> kahil@muss.CIS.McMaster.CA
>
>
>
Happy holidays to one and all - Soffie

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 12:01:33 -0500
From: Ceesay Soffie <Ceesay_Soffie@prc.com>
To: "'Gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <Gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: FW: story for the day
Message-ID: <C69DB1B2BFFBCF11B5D300000000000152DD64@Cry1.prc.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

> The Cookie Snatcher
>
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> While waiting at the airport terminal for her plane to begin
> boarding, a woman sat reading a newspaper. Earlier, she had
> purchased a package of cookies in the airport snack shop to
> eat
> after she got on the plane. Out of the corner of her eye, she
> noticed that the man sitting next to her was eating a cookie.
> She
> looked down and noticed that her package of cookies had been
> opened and the man was eating them. The woman couldn't believe
> that the man would have such nerve as to eat her cookies. So
> that
> she wouldn't lose all of her cookies to the man, she slowly
> reached over, took a cookie, and ate one herself. To her
> amazement, the man continued to eat more cookies. Getting more
> and more irritated, the woman removed all but one cookie from
> the
> package and ate them.
>
> At that point, the man reached down and took the last cookie.
> Before eating it, though, he broke it in half and left half of
> the cookie for the woman. This made the woman so angry, she
> grabbed the empty package with the half cookie and crammed it
> in
> her purse. Then, to her shock, she noticed that there in her
> purse was her unopened package of cookies.
>
> Sometimes when we judge or condemn others, we end up judging
> or
> condemning ourselves. Have you ever been too quick to pass
> judgement on another? When we do that, we put ourselves in a
> precarious and often embarrassing position. Check out all the
> facts, ask questions, listen carefully, and give people the
> benefit of the doubt. There is One Who loves mercy more than
> Judgement. Fortunately for us all, we can know Him.
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 13:38:19 -0500 (EST)
From: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Gambia Educational Support Plan-final call for comments
Message-ID: <199712181838.NAA12060@oak.ffr.mtu.edu>
Content-Type: text

>
>
>
>
>
> Dear Gambia-L readers,
>
> I would like to thank those who organised this forum for us to exchange
> views on our country. I would also like to thank those who put together
> the draft Gambia Educational Support Plan. I have the following comments:
>
> (1) As many of us are aware, the illiteracy rate in The Gambia is one of
> the highest in the world and is even worse in rural areas; therefore,
> support to primary education or even non-formal education could reach a
> large number of Gambians at less cost. There is evidence in the education
> literature that returns to every dollar spent on primary education is
> higher than investing in higher levels of education. Thus I am in favour of
> supporting a much higher number of primary school students and non-formal
> education if possible.
>
> (2) Nonetheless, I am also in support of investing in high schools and
> Gambia College in particular. However, I was a bit worried about the
> proposed mode of assisting Gambia College through member contribution of
> books. Although this is a noble idea, it may not be the most efficient.
> Why? Well the books donated may not be those needed by the students and
> faculty and given the very limited resources available perhaps a book fund
> could be more optimal. Members could contribute money to this fund and the
> fund managers could then discuss with Gambia College to purchase the most
> relevant books for the college.
>
> (3) Third, just reading the messages on Gambia-1, I realised we have a
> very diverse pool of talented Gambians all over the world and perhaps we
> should explore a medium for such folks to go back to The Gambia for a
> limited period to contribute their expertise. For example, Dr Nyang has
> amassed a lot of knowlege on African (and Gambian ofcourse) history and how
> about organising a three-month Visiting Scholar Programme at Gambia College
> or other appropriate institutions for him to organise seminars/lectures for
> students and Gambian practitoners as well. Should Gambian history be
> re-written by such such scholars along the lines of the seminal work of
> Chiekh Anta Diop or Basil Davidson?
>
> (4) How about a good photocopier for the Gambia College Library? I
> remember as an undergraduate student at UC- Berkeley our lecturers used
> to prepare a reader with articles photocopied from various sources which we
> purchased at low cost.
>
> Thanks and regards,
>
> Housainou Taal
> Programme coordinator,
> UN World Food Programme,
> Rome, ITALY
>
>
>
Housainou and Tamsir,
Thank you for your time. The Draft committee have your comments and
will do everything to include them in the document. The goal at the moment
is to present a fairly broad document now. Once structures are in place
details could be easily added.

Malanding jaiteh




------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 13:38:30 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Wow moe.... (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712181838.AA23880@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Wow Moe'

This person (Mr. Payne) was deep. It is obvious that he is informed, well
traveled and placed thought and labor into his response.

Moe, I somewhat feel small for posing the question, yet I am constantly
reinforcing myself by telling myself, "well, it was the truth, it was how
you (I) felt".

Moe, do you think I was narrow minded in the second response I sent to
soffie?

Bernard

PS. Moe, I thought about it, I guess I feel as though Africa owes some
form of apology. Rather I feel that Africa is "obligated" to reach out to
build a bridge to us. Not doing so is like blaming the rape victim. It is
ludicrous to perceive African Americans are the violators. Can you fathom
the thought of the amount of Respect (fear included) the world would
bestow upon those of African decent if we undeniably came together?? I
feel as though Africa is preventing that from happening due to ignorance
and as I stated earlier prejudice.

Peace be upon you brother,

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 14:41:00 -0500
From: Bennie Robinson <BROBINSON@gwmail.kysu.edu>
To: mec97a14@tron.lyngbyes.dk, gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re:christmas Holidays
Message-ID: <s499361e.007@gwmail.kysu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Disposition: inline

Pease unsubscribe me from December 18, 1997 until January 31, 1998. Thank you.
>>> Fatou Khan <mec97a14@tron.lyngbyes.dk> 12/18/97 07:27AM >>>
HEY,
WILL YOU PLEASE UNSUBSCRIBE ME FORM THE 19TH OF DEC TO THE 5TH OF JAN. I
AM GOING ON VACATION.
THANK YOU.
FATOU KHAN


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 07:28:45 +0330
From: "malang maane" <langjr@worldnet.att.net>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Tribute to Kekoto Maane
Message-ID: <19971218232604.AAA29949@kansala.avana.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello guys,
I was told that there was a tribute for my dad, Mr Kekoto Maane on this
list and I never got to see it. I would really appreciate if someone can
forward it to me. I am not sure how feasible this will be bcos it might
have already been deleted. Anyway i am wishing myself good luck.
Thanks to all of ya'll.
Lang Jr.


----------
> From: Modou Jallow <mjallow@st6000.sct.edu>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
<gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: Re: Racial Discriminatiion (fwd)
> Date: 18 December 1997 06:20
>
> Hi folks,
>
> Thank you to all those who responded to the subject 'Re: Racial
> Discrimination'. You provided some very interesting and eye-opening
> arguments and opinions. I hope we call learn from this.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> ===================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> -------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 21:31:18 -0500
From: M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu, Bernard Weston <bernard@raleigh.ibm.com>
Subject: Re: Wow moe.... (fwd)
Message-ID: <3499DC76.F6062358@mindspring.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

> Bernard
>
> PS. Moe, I thought about it, I guess I feel as though Africa owes some
> form of apology. Rather I feel that Africa is "obligated" to reach out to
> build a bridge to us. Not doing so is like blaming the rape victim. It is
> ludicrous to perceive African Americans are the violators. Can you fathom
> the thought of the amount of Respect (fear included) the world would
> bestow upon those of African decent if we undeniably came together?? I
> feel as though Africa is preventing that from happening due to ignorance
> and as I stated earlier prejudice.
>
> Peace be upon you brother,

Mr. Bernard and Gambia-L'ers:

The blueprints for the bridge which I think we agree needs to be built, must
be drafted and constructed by those social engineers and construction workers
from all corners of Africa and the diaspora. The obligation is on all of us,
as brother Pa Musa Jallow has already demonstrated that the familial ignorance
and insensitivity is owned by many of us on all sides of the Atlantic. As one
Anansi story asserts, (yes, I know this is a culturally inappropriate
reference, but I don't know of any equivalent "Sango ning Suluwo" story) that
neither wisdom [nor ignorance] is monopolized by any one people. We are all
in the same boat, having been placed there by the same historic forces. Thus,
for any of us to get out of this rickety, leaking boat, we must forge a
cooperation, which will utilize the best of our talents.

With the wide base of information which we have access to here in the States,
it is criminal for us to be ill-informed about most subjects, and particularly
about Africa. I believe that in terms of written documentary sources on
Africa, there is more here in the U.S. than in all of the countries in Africa
combined. Under such conditions, it should not be anyone's duty but our own,
to seek that information. Africa on the other hand, still has a wealth of
oral lore which can be of aid in understanding our divergent and common
heritage; and that is a bit of the information which we must tap. And by the
way, Ghana's Head of State, Jerry Rawlings has openly welcomed all diasporic
Africans to come, lend our skills and talents to help develop Ghana, as there
is land waiting for us, if we are willing to back up our statements. The
spirit of this invitation is nothing new, as Ghana opened its arms to receive
a frustrated W.E.B. DuBois in 1958. How many of us, have taken up that offer?
South Africa under Mandela has made a broader, but similar offer as well. The
problem with the South African offer though, is that the way in which it was
positioned, would lead to many of us going there to make money by exploiting
the already exploited population of Black South Africans. Lack of access to
that type of information, and a lack of a concerted willingness to extend
ourselves to access that information, rank among the chief reasons for the
lack of knowledge of such things.

However, the intent of my original response was that all people of good will,
should come together to recall and recast our common links and renew the bonds
of kinship, which were lost during the period of the Middle Passage. More
concretely Gambia-L, among other things, could very well serve as the anvil
upon which those links are forged.

Brother Bernard, it cannot be up to continental Africans alone to build these
bridges, but rather it is the obligation of diasporic Africans as well.
Apologies are unnecessary, because all of us (in this discussion) historically
played some part in the tragedy called the Middle Passage and chattel slavery
(obviously, some people played a much larger role than others, but the onus of
that is neither on continental Africans, nor on diasporic Africans. I am not
sure whether or not you are feeding off Dr. Nyang's eloquent overview of
slavery, but I have a reaction to that overview, which further explores
(through anecdote) both the reality of the slave trade as it existed in
Africa, and slavery as it existed in the Americas. As such I decline to lay
blame on continental Africans for this "peculiar institution." However, the
reaction is a bit long and probably unnecessary at this point.) Whatever the
case, Europe and Euro-America benefitted economically and technologically from
this period, and still reaps those benefits as part of its legacy, so we
should not engage in pointing fingers at one another as this does not serve
any useful purpose. However, I believe that this dialogue, is a step in a
more positive direction. Hopefully, the dialogue will continue, we then learn
from it and move forward as a result

Let's collaborate and build bridges.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 22:22:36 EST
From: BobbySil <BobbySil@aol.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <b64d23e2.3499e87e@aol.com>
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

MOE,

CAN YOU ASK BERNARD TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE LIST INSTEAD OF HAVING TO
FORWARD MAILS TO YOU. THIS WILL ENHANCE THE DIALOGUE...DONT YOU AGREE!!!

MERRY XMAS!
Baboucarr Sillah

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 23:55:46 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: The Nigeria I hate (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712190455.AA39386@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I think this might interest some of you. If not, please...pardon me.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow


> Category: Editorial
> Date of Article: 12/16/97
> Topic: The Nigeria I Hate
> Author: Harry Garuba
> Full Text of Article:
>
> YEARS ago, as a young research fellow at the University of Texas, I would
> run into young men and women wearing "Texas Longhorns" T-shirts and face
> caps and briefly wonder why this animal was so dear to Texans. And then I
> began to see people wearing T-shirts inscribed with the words "I love
> Texas" or "I love Dallas" and other such varieties that spoke of city love
> and country love. Since then, I have seen boys and girls in the streets of
> Lagos wearing "I love America" or "I love New York" on the clothes. I have
> nothing against these T-shirts and I even admire the handy mix of culture
> and commercialism which they represent. America is, of course, the world
> headquarters of pop culture and commerce and since the country dominates
> the world in these areas who can deny them the right to imperialise the
> rest of us who are not so gifted? When these things become worrisome is
> when I sense, beneath the veneer of commercialism, the stirrings of a
> vulgar nationalism which casts anyone who does not love America in this way
> as either a fool or a demon. How can you not love God's own country, the
> land of freedom and opportunity, the melting pot, the El Dorado of the
> world? Now, that is when it gets dangerous.
>
> The syrupy sentiments of nationalism get murky when they demonise others
> and turn myth and symbolism into sacred sites of worship where groups
> identity is sacrelised and exclusivist rituals are performed. This is why
> decent people throughout history have always been wary of nationalism. The
> English writer, Samuel Johnson, once said that "patriotism is the last
> refuge of the scoundrel". Our own Chinua Achebe in a reaction to a former
> head of state's assertion that Nigeria is a great country countered that
> Nigeria is one of the dirtiest and lousiest places in the world. And a
> former president of West Germany was once asked if he loved his country and
> he swiftly replied: "hell no ! I love my wife." That president - I forgot
> his name - must have had memories of nazism in his mind when he gave that
> reply.
>
> Loving your country, whether right or wrong, has led to some of the worst
> atrocities in history and has shielded individuals from the moral
> responsibility of asserting their humanity in the face of evil. The Serbs
> and the Muslims in Bosnia, the Hutus and the Tutsis in Rwanda and Burundi,
> in the genocidal rage, were helped along the way by this love for one's
> people which licences you to do anything to others in the name of promoting
> your people's interest.
>
> I am glad to say that I am not a nationalist nor patriot of that hue. I do
> not love Nigeria. I do not wave flags or posters nor do I wear badges
> emblazoned with any leader's image. I do not match to patriotic songs nor
> goose step in company with those who believe in such effusions of
> nationalism. And why should I love a land which has turned all the values I
> cherish upside down, has stiffled the spirit of innovation and creativity
> which make a people progress, and had enthroned unquestioning deference to
> authority and enshrined subservience and sycophancy as national values.
> That is not a country I can love, so this piece is about the Nigeria I
> hate.
>
> The Nigeria I hate is the country which has encouraged its intellectuals to
> migrate to other lands by crippling the economy and fostering tyranny and
> dictatorship. A nation's greatest asset is its intellectual capital and
> Nigeria once had great empires that treasured and nurtured this asset. I
> remember in particular the Benin Kingdom run by a certain Ogun Ewuare, a
> military genius with imperial ambitions and a militaristic instinct if ever
> there was one. But this same warrior was the man who created quarters in
> his capital city for the best in all the professions so that they could
> continue the work of invention and creativity. He brought the best iron
> smiths from all over the empire and resettled them in the Igun area of
> Benin. He brought the best medicine men and herbalists, the artisans and
> craftsmen and all the bests everywhere to reinforce the creative and
> innovate base of his kingdom. He redesigned the capital city in a manner
> that paid tribute to excellence and the lineages with which this excellence
> was connected.
>
> Everywhere in the country there were empires of this nature which despite
> their militarism conceded spaces to the creative and inquiring mind. Now,
> several centuries later, their example has been turned on its head. The
> urge to explore, the spirit of innovation and adventure, the discoveries
> has been killed. The caliphate, built on the intellectual thoughts of Dan
> Fodio, has been turned into vast area of illiteracy and pompous ceremony, a
> place from which the very idea of thinking is banned and anti-intellectual
> posturing has replaced the idea of building libraries and laboratories. The
> people of the Book have become the ones who hate books and ideas, who
> scupper the inventiveness, find all iconoclasts suspect and pander to the
> politics of power and patronage.
>
> And when you look eastwards to the land of debate and republicanism, what
> do you find replacing the ethos of hardwork and achievement? A venal
> materialism that brooks no opposition and harbours no moral scrupples in
> the bid for unearned wealth and the glory of flaunting it. The creativity
> of the Awka black smiths has been buried under the mercantilist spirit of
> the importers of "containers", the drug barons and the 419ers. So bad have
> things become that most boys have abandoned schooling and apprenticed
> themselves to the vulgar hordes who will stop at nothing, including ritual
> murder, to get along. It will be a sorry day when those who cannot find
> their way and show others the way buy all the pathfinders in the world.
>
> And turning west on this demented compass, you are disgusted by the love
> for obscene ceremony, of burial ceremonies that never seem to end, endless
> rituals emptied of content for which people amass unimaginable debts and
> raid bank vaults. A consmetic culture of clothes and trinkets which will
> make the most blue blooded medieval aristocrat wince confronts you with
> epic vulgarity. The poetic rhetoric of tonal language designed for
> imaginative expression and creativity has been turned inside out and
> destroyed in the race to devise new epithets to praise the rich and corrupt
> who now rule the land.
>
> Pray, where in this arid desert can I find things to love? And here we are
> only looking at cultures not institutions and infrastructure. If we turn
> our eyes to these, we will simply give way to despair. So we had better not
> mention the political parties, the public utilities, the hospitals, schools
> and roads nor the judiciary or the police and other agencies. What is there
> to love in these things? Look around you and tell me what you love about
> this country the way it is today?
>
> Originality, the urge to think and experiment, the ability to debate and
> allow for a plurality of opinions and voices, these are all dead in the
> country I know. The people in the process are also dying. To stop this land
> from dying we need an intellectual renaissance which can only happen when
> we once again allow creativity and dissent. If there is a Nigeria of that
> dream tomorrow and I am around to see it, I may then decide to make good
> business out of selling "I love Nigeria" T-shirts.
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 00:32:28 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712190532.AA40956@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Baboucarr Sillah, you wrote:
>
> MOE,
>
> CAN YOU ASK BERNARD TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE LIST INSTEAD OF HAVING TO
> FORWARD MAILS TO YOU. THIS WILL ENHANCE THE DIALOGUE...DONT YOU AGREE!!!
>
> MERRY XMAS!
> Baboucarr Sillah

I agree and thank you for the suggestion. However, he does not have
reliable e-mail access at this time. He has two accounts: one that only
sends and another that only receives. Additionally, he seemed to think
that Gambia-L was ONLY for the discussion of Gambian issues but I think
his most recent question may have jolted that notion, and will probably
inspire him to consider joining the group.

Peace and happy holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
=========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 01:25:01 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: humor: Ever been a waiter or waited on?
Message-ID: <9712190625.AA26838@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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A customer was continually bothering the waiter in a
restaurant; first, he'd asked that the air conditioning be turned
up because he was too hot, then he asked it be turned down
cause he was too cold, and so on for about half an hour.

Surprisingly, the waiter was very patient, he walked back and
forth and never once got angry. So finally, a second customer
asked him why he didn't throw out the pest.

"Oh I don't care." said the waiter with a smile. "We don't even
have an air conditioner."

Happy Holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 01:42:58 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Question...
Message-ID: <9712190642.AA24670@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hello Folks,

How and where did the word 'slavery' originate? Was it used well before
the Europeans came to Africa? If so, how has the word changed over time?

Any comments will be appreicated.

Thank you and happy holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 02:02:44 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Help needed!
Message-ID: <9712190702.AA27986@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hello Gambia-Lers,

I will appreciate it very much if you can help provide me with information
on research and publications on the history of post-independent Gambia. I
am particularly interested in the history between the years of 1900 to
1965.

I had hoped that some Gambia-Lers, who might have some information and
particular interest in the subject, might also have some information about
accessing such data. After searching furiously on the webb for several
days, I have not found anything constructive to the extent of my
satisfaction.

If you have any information you would like to share, please send me a
private e-mail with details.

Thank you and happy holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

========================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 08:20:34 +0000
From: Abdou O Gibba <Abdou.Gibba@smr.uib.no>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Tribute to Kekoto Maane
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19971219082034.006e4eec@alf.uib.no>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi Lang!

I sent this tribute to your dad on the 5th. of November. Here it is once
again as you requested it:

I Wrote:

Hi G-lers!

Here is something a brother, Baaba Silla, gave me the permission to share
with list members. I really like the name spelling part, so I will give it a
try myself:-

Abdu Ujimaay Jibba.

BTW, Try it yourself, it may be fun or even adoptive.
-----------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------

FWD: WEEP NOT FOR KEEKOTOO BUN ABDU SALAAM MAANE. By Baaba Silla, Norway.

Like all deaths the people that you leave behind are left with a mix of
emotions ranging from sadness to a profound sense of grief and loss. The
demise of Kotoo-Kee was yet another episode in life's unending dramas. Who
was this shy unassuming character?

A man of few words, a boy of the old school, who harboured a keen sense of
right and wrong, a devout muslim, a product of Armitage and a family-centred
man.

It is difficult to judge a person for what he has done, though like most
African intellectuals it will suffice to say that he was caught-up with life
and had difficulty breaking out to the spriral of sorting out the extended
family needs. Consequently the immediate demands of living override the
demands of the pen.

During my long standing association with him spanning over thirty
years(first as his pupil and then as his colleague at Armitage and Crab
Island respectively), I have never doubted his creative abilities, sharpness
of wit and intellectual powess. Regrettably, Kotoo Kee has not left much by
way of literary work to enable critics and supporters to assess his world
outlook and more especially, his impact on the Gambian body politic.

I have had the good fortune to witness two major interventions that Kee made
in the past two decades and these are:-

a) Kumba Banjul/Samba Banjul play:
Here, his voice as an author was unequivocal in joining Samba's society in
their denunciation of his violation of tradition and for not living up to
the expectations of his society.

Samba had to make amends to his people by, renouncing all the values and
trappings of the elite that he had newly acquired. Kee did not hesitate
therefore to reward the young hero,a deserving bride, Kumba, following his
acquiescence.

Kee could be understood only if we situate our mind-set against the backdrop
of the pre-independence and the immediate aftermath of the African countries
gaining constitutional status. The African intelligentsia was trying to
rediscover themselves. The main intellectual impulse derived from Casley
Hayford, Edward Francis Small, Seghore, Ceasaire and Fanon to name but a
few. Though his other influences are legion, the dominant and most
fashionable philosophy of the day was negritude.

Despite their potency of these ideas, at the time and the probability that
they may have impinged on his subconscious, we must hand it on to Kee for
his strong sense of his own individual.

While conceding that Kee had an innate tendency towards reveering good
old-fashion values of thrift religious spirituality,respect and a meticulous
sense for detail, I hasten to add that Kee had no difficulty reconciling
this potpourri of ideas, beliefs and practices.

The Play therefore offers an innocuous critique of the life of the emerging
petty-bourgeoisie in post colonial Africa. Kee was a man of his times.

b) Following on from the trail blazed by Rev. J. C. Faye and Master Silla(h)
in developing a national autography for gambian languages, Kee insisted upon
spelling our names as we say and hear them. This is of course in direct
contravention to the ways that approximated to anglo-saxon auditory
perceptions of African phonology. Nonetheless, we have ourselves imbibed
these ways and I dear say some of us resent any changes to the old order.

Try these:
- Why do we spell LOWE with the redundant (WE)?
- BAKAW with A U instead of A W.
- YAYA JAMME(H) instead of YAYAA JAMME.
- ALHAGY NJIE BIRI instead of ALAAJI NJAAY BIIRI?
- DALASI does not have a plural in Mandika. Why do we keep adding (S) to
indicate that it is in plural form? Is it not enough to say 2 dalasi?
Think about your own names and see if you will come up with something new.

For all its worth Keekotoo et. al. have created a paradigm shift. You may
applaud him or condemn him but the fact remains that he has left us with
some food thought. Is this yet another fading voice to be washed away by the
tide? I sincerely hope not.

In my humble estimation, Kee has contributed immensely to education in The
Gambia. And credit must be given where it is due. The lessons we learn from
his death is pointedly, our own mortality and the fragility of life. Weep
not for Kee, the challenge is to build on his experience and vision. His
legacy lives on.

Jaraama Kee.

----------------------------E---N---D-----------------------------------------

THANKS FOR READING THROUGH!

Abdu Ujimaay Jibba ( :-) )



At 07:28 18/12/97 +0330, you wrote:
>Hello guys,
>I was told that there was a tribute for my dad, Mr Kekoto Maane on this
>list and I never got to see it. I would really appreciate if someone can
>forward it to me. I am not sure how feasible this will be bcos it might
>have already been deleted. Anyway i am wishing myself good luck.
>Thanks to all of ya'll.
>Lang Jr.
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 02:20:26 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Help needed!
Message-ID: <9712190720.AA25006@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

> Hello Gambia-Lers,
>
> I will appreciate it very much if you can help provide me with information
> on research and publications on the history of post-independent Gambia. I
> am particularly interested in the history between the years of 1900 to
> 1965.

Did I say post-independent? I really meant pre-independent (before
independence). Boy, I must be really sleepy. Please, do not blame me. It's
2:30 in the morning here in Georgia :-)))))).

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 09:20:22 +0100
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <9B236DF9AF96CF11A5C94044F32190311DB386@DKDIFS02>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I was not aware that Mr. Payne was not a member of the list, and I have
just returned the fellowing message to him. Hope he sees it. Asbj=F8rn


"Mr. Payne, thank you, yes let=B4s build bridges and enlighten our
brothers and sisters, fathers and mothers and children all over the
world. That is one of the things I come to learn from my first meeting
with africa, africans, gambians some 20 years back. We have so much to
give one another, and by mutual help we can maybe also get our
politicians and some ignorants to understand what is all about. Merry
Christmas from Asbj=F8rn Nordam"

> ----------
> Fra: M W Payne[SMTP:awo@mindspring.com]
> Svar til: awo@mindspring.com
> Sendt: 19. december 1997 03:31
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: Re: Wow moe.... (fwd)
>=20
> > Bernard
> Whatever the
> case, Europe and Euro-America benefitted economically and
> technologically from
> this period, and still reaps those benefits as part of its legacy, so
> we
> should not engage in pointing fingers at one another as this does =
not
> serve
> any useful purpose. However, I believe that this dialogue, is a step
> in a
> more positive direction. Hopefully, the dialogue will continue, we
> then learn
> from it and move forward as a result
>=20
> Let's collaborate and build bridges.
>=20
>=20
>=20
> ----------
> Fra: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sendt: 19. december 1997 06:32
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
>=20
> Baboucarr Sillah, you wrote:
> >=20
> > MOE,
> >=20
> > CAN YOU ASK BERNARD TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE LIST INSTEAD OF =
HAVING
> TO
> > FORWARD MAILS TO YOU. THIS WILL ENHANCE THE DIALOGUE...DONT YOU
> AGREE!!!
> >=20
> > MERRY XMAS!
> > Baboucarr Sillah
>=20
> I agree and thank you for the suggestion. However, he does not have
> reliable e-mail access at this time. He has two accounts: one that
> only
> sends and another that only receives. Additionally, he seemed to =
think
> that Gambia-L was ONLY for the discussion of Gambian issues but I
> think
> his most recent question may have jolted that notion, and will
> probably
> inspire him to consider joining the group.=20
>=20
> Peace and happy holidays!
>=20
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
> =

> =3D=3D=3D
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> =
----------------------------------------------------------------------
> ---
>=20

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 09:28:19 +0100
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Asbj=F8rn_Nordam?= <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: SV: Help needed!
Message-ID: <9B236DF9AF96CF11A5C94044F32190311DB387@DKDIFS02>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hello Moe, and that get me to think of the Gambia National Museum, and
other institutions like that. Maybe it=B4s luxury for Gambians to find
funds, support or money from the States budget, when people need food.
But one day like you, most of the gambians want to know more detailed
about the history, and like one of you said the other day, the
school-books need history chapters. To form our national identity, the
history must be told and reconstructed. How is the Gambia National
Museum supported ? Asbj=F8rn Nordam
> ----------
> Fra: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> Sendt: 19. december 1997 08:20
> Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> Emne: Re: Help needed!
>=20
> > Hello Gambia-Lers,
> >=20
> > I will appreciate it very much if you can help provide me with
> information
> > on research and publications on the history of post-independent
> Gambia. I
> > am particularly interested in the history between the years of 1900
> to
> > 1965.=20
>=20
> Did I say post-independent? I really meant pre-independent (before
> independence). Boy, I must be really sleepy. Please, do not blame me.
> It's
> 2:30 in the morning here in Georgia :-)))))).=20
>=20
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>=20

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 11:36:52 +0200
From: momodou.camara@post3.tele.dk (Camara, Momodou)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Help needed!
Message-ID: <19971219103714.AAA56570@momodou>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Tomaa,
I just bought three books during my last trip to Gambia.

1. Leaders of the Senegambia Region: Reactions to the European
Infiltration by Mrs. Patience Sonko-Godwin.
The book covers an area of The Gambia National History Syllabus, GCE
"O" level, WAEC and that of Social and Environmental Studies for
Middle Schools in the Gambia.

2. Social and political Structures in The Precolonial periods (Ethnic
Groups of The Senegambia Region) by Mrs. Patience Sonko-Godwin.
The book deals specifically with the social and political structures
of the major ethnic groups.

3.Stories of Senegambia by Dr. florence Mahoney. The book is written
for all teachers engaged in educating "our children in Junior
Secondary Schools, and for all student-teachers".

All three books are printed in Gambia.

Momodou Camara

On 19 Dec 97 at 2:20, Modou Jallow wrote:

> > Hello Gambia-Lers,
> >
> > I will appreciate it very much if you can help provide me with information
> > on research and publications on the history of post-independent Gambia. I
> > am particularly interested in the history between the years of 1900 to
> > 1965.
>
> Did I say post-independent? I really meant pre-independent (before
> independence). Boy, I must be really sleepy. Please, do not blame
> me. It's 2:30 in the morning here in Georgia :-)))))).
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 10:40:28 +0000
From: f-demba@cougarnet.netexp.net (Famara_Demba)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Request
Message-ID: <19971219104026.AAA2664@harrison.0.acs.ohio-state.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Managers,

Since I am on the verge of going away, I would like you to suspend my
membership until further notice. I thank you very much for your usual
cooperation.

Remember folks, drink and drive is deadly and only a dim wit would do that.
Lets be careful and keep hopes alive.

Peace on earth!
Famara Demba


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 05:44:42 -0500
From: M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SV: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <349A501A.A7A0F8CB@mindspring.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Thank you for your thoughts, but M W Payne is a member of Gambia-:L. Mr.
Baboucarr Sillah expressed the idea that Bernard become a member of
Gambia-L.

M W Payne

Asbjrn Nordam wrote:

> I was not aware that Mr. Payne was not a member of the list, and I have
> just returned the fellowing message to him. Hope he sees it. Asbjrn
>
> "Mr. Payne, thank you, yes lets build bridges and enlighten our
> brothers and sisters, fathers and mothers and children all over the
> world. That is one of the things I come to learn from my first meeting
> with africa, africans, gambians some 20 years back. We have so much to
> give one another, and by mutual help we can maybe also get our
> politicians and some ignorants to understand what is all about. Merry
> Christmas from Asbjrn Nordam"
>
> > ----------
> > Fra: M W Payne[SMTP:awo@mindspring.com]
> > Svar til: awo@mindspring.com
> > Sendt: 19. december 1997 03:31
> > Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> > Emne: Re: Wow moe.... (fwd)
> >
> > > Bernard
> > Whatever the
> > case, Europe and Euro-America benefitted economically and
> > technologically from
> > this period, and still reaps those benefits as part of its legacy, so
> > we
> > should not engage in pointing fingers at one another as this does not
> > serve
> > any useful purpose. However, I believe that this dialogue, is a step
> > in a
> > more positive direction. Hopefully, the dialogue will continue, we
> > then learn
> > from it and move forward as a result
> >
> > Let's collaborate and build bridges.
> >
> >
> >
> > ----------
> > Fra: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu[SMTP:mjallow@st6000.sct.edu]
> > Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> > Sendt: 19. december 1997 06:32
> > Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> > Emne: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
> >
> > Baboucarr Sillah, you wrote:
> > >
> > > MOE,
> > >
> > > CAN YOU ASK BERNARD TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE LIST INSTEAD OF HAVING
> > TO
> > > FORWARD MAILS TO YOU. THIS WILL ENHANCE THE DIALOGUE...DONT YOU
> > AGREE!!!
> > >
> > > MERRY XMAS!
> > > Baboucarr Sillah
> >
> > I agree and thank you for the suggestion. However, he does not have
> > reliable e-mail access at this time. He has two accounts: one that
> > only
> > sends and another that only receives. Additionally, he seemed to think
> > that Gambia-L was ONLY for the discussion of Gambian issues but I
> > think
> > his most recent question may have jolted that notion, and will
> > probably
> > inspire him to consider joining the group.
> >
> > Peace and happy holidays!
> >
> > Regards,
> > Moe S. Jallow
> > ======================================================================
> > ===
> > mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > ---
> >




------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 13:01:36 +0300
From: "BASSIROU DODOU DRAMMEH" <kolls567@qatar.net.qa>
To: <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: The Nigeria I hate (fwd)
Message-ID: <199712191641.NAA13839@qatar.net.qa>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr.Jallow!
That was a great artitcle you forwarded.Thanks and keep up the good work
down there!

Regards Bassss!

----------
.. To stop this land
> > from dying we need an intellectual renaissance which can only happen
when
> > we once again allow creativity and dissent. If there is a Nigeria of
that
> > dream tomorrow and I am around to see it, I may then decide to make
good
> > business out of selling "I love Nigeria" T-shirts.
> >
>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 07:24:27 -0500
From: M W Payne <awo@mindspring.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Help needed!
Message-ID: <349A677A.87EF387A@mindspring.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mr. Jallow,

The following is a brief bibliography of some books on The Gambia. However, I
believe that at least one of the list members has direct access to Dr. Gamble,
who has done an extensive amount of research on The Gambia. If he can be
contacted directly, perhaps he could share some of his information with the
list.

Additionally, this could also be an interesting topic for the list. That is
to say, a discussion of Gambian history (in manageable stages) could provide
the fuel for much discussion. At any rate, here is the brief list:



Archer, Francis Bisset.
1967. The Gambia colony and protectorate: an official handbook. [1868].
London: Cass.

Bakarr, S. A.
1980 The Gambia yesterday, 1447-1979 : (an ideal compilation-every use).
Banjul, Gambia : Published for the Gambia Press Union.

Baldeh, Mary Umah.
1981 Gambian Fula stories. San Francisco : D.P. Gamble,

Berry, W. T. C. (William Thomas Charles)
1984 Before the wind of change. Suffolk, England : Halesworth Press.

Challis, Stephen H.
1980 A history of local government in Kombo North District, Western
Division, the Gambia, 1889-1944. Banjul, Gambia : Oral History and
Antiquities Division, Vice President's Office, Old National Library.

Darbo, Seni.
1976 A griot's self-portrait : the origins and role of the griot in
Mandinka society as seen from stories told by Gambian griots. Banjul : Gambia
Cultural Archives.

Daun, Holger.
1974 Change, conflict potential and politics : two Gambian case-studies.
Meddelande - Statsvetenskapliga institutionen: Lunds universitet

Gailey, Harry A.
1975 Historical dictionary of the Gambia. Metuchen, N.J. : Scarecrow
Press,

Gailey, Harry A.
1965 A history of the Gambia. New York : Praeger.

Gamble, David P.
1967 Bibliography of the Gambia. Bathurst, Gambia: Govt. printer.

Gamble, David P.
1979 A general bibliography of the Gambia (up to 31 December 1977).
Boston: G. K. Hall.

Gamble, David P.
1982 Gambia government serial publications of the colonial period : a
provisional list. San Francisco : D.P. Gamble.

Gamble, David P.
1983 From the Gambian rebellion to the Senegambian confederation : a
provisional bibliography. San Francisco: D.P. Gamble.

Gamble, David P.
1988 The Gambia. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Clio Press.

Gamble, David P.
1996 The south bank of the Gambia : places, people, and population.
Brisbane, Calif.:

Gray, John Milner, Sir.
1966 A history of the Gambia. New York: Barnes & Noble

Hughes, Arnold.
1991 The Gambia : studies in society and politics. Birmingham, England:
Centre of West African Studies, University of Birmingham.

Nyang, Sulayman S. (Sulayman Shieh)
1975 The historical development of political parties in the Gambia.
Washington, D.C.: Howard University.

Quinn, Charlotte A.
1972 Mandingo kingdoms of the Senegambia : traditionalism, Islam, and
European expansion. London : Longman.

Reeve, Henry Fenwick.
1969 The Gambia : its history, ancient, mediaeval, and modern, together
with its geographical, geological, and ethnographical conditions, and a
description of the birds, beasts, and fishes found therein. New York : Negro
Universities Press,.

Sagnia, B. K.
1991 Historical development of the Gambian legislature. Lawrenceville, Va.
: Brunswick.

Sidibe, B. K.
1976 Kaabu and Fuladu: historical narratives of the Gambian Mandinka.
London: University of London School of Oriental and African Studies.

Sidibe, B. K.
1975 Senegambian traditional families; Women in traditional Senegambian
society, past, present, and future. Banjul: Gambia Cultural Archives.

Sidibeh, Binta Jammeh.
1980 A study on the traditional roles of men and women in a Gambian
society, and how they affect the society-economic status of women. Banjul,
Gambia: Gambia National Women's Council & Bureau.

Southorn, Bella Sidney (Woolf), Lady.
1952 The Gambia : the story of the Groundnut Colony. London : Allen &
Unwin.

Sowa, Mary Beth.
1995 The Gambia. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Officers.

Regards,

M W Payne

Modou Jallow wrote:

> Hello Gambia-Lers,
>
> I will appreciate it very much if you can help provide me with information
> on research and publications on the history of post-independent Gambia. I
> am particularly interested in the history between the years of 1900 to
> 1965.
>
> I had hoped that some Gambia-Lers, who might have some information and
> particular interest in the subject, might also have some information about
> accessing such data. After searching furiously on the webb for several
> days, I have not found anything constructive to the extent of my
> satisfaction.
>
> If you have any information you would like to share, please send me a
> private e-mail with details.
>
> Thank you and happy holidays!
>
> Regards,
> Moe S. Jallow
>
> ========================================================================
> mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.com
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------




------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 13:28:23 GMT0BST
From: "L.A.E. WRIGHT" <eco7laew@lucs-02.novell.leeds.ac.uk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: unlist
Message-ID: <2715C4C2216@lucs-02.novell.leeds.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

KINDLY UNLIST ME TILL THE 31 JANUARY 1998. WILL BE AWAY FOR THE
HOLIDAYS AND WILL BE BUSY WITH EXAMS ON MY RETURN. WILL SURE MISS ALL
THE NEWS.

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL OUT THERE.

AINA WRIGHT

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 13:53:50 GMT
From: CAMARA BAKEBBA <cb714@greenwich.ac.uk>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: NINETEEN STUDENTS FROM BANJUL ACADEMY STILL DON'T HAVE THEIR
Message-ID: <D97EE34981@gre-wo-stu2.greenwich.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Dear Bantaba Members,
I would like the list members to
know that nineteen Arts students from Banjul Academy, a new High
school under the influence of Mr. I.M.L Drammeh (Principal) were
denied having their O'level results. However, according to one of the
students', Lamin S. Fadera; who has been following his result from
the school has been told by the principal that West African
Examination Council (WAEC) had reasonable doubt on whether the
students have done Arts & Craft practical work on their own. The
principal then asked Lamin to go home and wait until they have final
statement from the examination council.

Ten days later, Lamin returned to the school to see what was going
on, this time the principal told him the Examination council has
finally cancelled all their results and their decision is final.
Lamin could not believe this action because neither the school nor
the Examination council has done no investigation to see whether the
students were guilty of this wrong doing. After all these stories, I
decided to telephone my father in the Gambia, for him to see the
principal about this issue. Again my father came out with the same
stories. There I decided yet again to phone the Examination council
in Banjul but this time i was not allowed to speak to the director
concerned. The receptionist could not answer my questions but still
refused to direct me to the right person, and the only answer she
told me was that they don't deal with parents.

I wonder what these students would feel after two years hard-working
and every thing end up to be zero. How on Earth! would you justify
this action? can any one tell me whether there is any way that we can
help these students to have their results. If not why don't they
allowed them to do that particular work again before terminating all
the results. What of the other subjects they did in the examination
day? should every thing have be terminated because of one practical
work being subjected to unapproval by the examination board? Please,
members I need your opinions to this problem and any one who can help
in any form will be thank for the effort.

I will also welcome those who are in the Gambia to try and do their
best for these vonurable students. I hope justice be done every man,
whether you are rich or poor. Your comments are highly wel-come.

B.Camara.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 10:44:13 -0500
From: Bennie Robinson <BROBINSON@gwmail.kysu.edu>
To: eco7laew@lucs-02.novell.leeds.ac.uk, gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: unlist
Message-ID: <s49a501c.048@gwmail.kysu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Disposition: inline

Please unlist me until January 31, 1998. I will be on leave until then. Thank you.

>>> "L.A.E. WRIGHT" <eco7laew@lucs-02.novell.leeds.ac.uk> 12/19/97 01:28PM >>>
KINDLY UNLIST ME TILL THE 31 JANUARY 1998. WILL BE AWAY FOR THE
HOLIDAYS AND WILL BE BUSY WITH EXAMS ON MY RETURN. WILL SURE MISS ALL
THE NEWS.

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL OUT THERE.

AINA WRIGHT


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 12:02:37 -0500
From: nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Question...
Message-ID: <19971219.120240.3662.0.nahak@juno.com>

The word "slavery" were known to us by the Europeans when they came to
Africa. The mistakes we make as Africans is that, when we read history
books that were written by Europeans we failed to ask the following
questions: Why did the Europeans come to Africa? What made them think
that they can write our own history? Why did they decide to write African
history? Will the history they write be favorable to us or to them? Was
the history written in African point of view or European point of view?
What is the purpose of the history? Please fellow humans, let us not lump
things together that do not mean the same thing. What I mean is that we
take Prisoners of wars, "Surga", "Nalemp", Internship, in Africa to mean
slavery. If we know our history, we will realize that this is what the
Europeans did to our history to justify slavery in Africa. We need to be
able to think past the written history to understand slavery in Africa.
Let us find out more about oral history, digging history, nature history
and culture history. To understand Africa, we must get it from Africans
not from Europeans. How can you say you know my house much better than I
who live in the house? Let's wake up so that we can build a better future
for our children. God bless you all.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 13:20:29 -0500 (EST)
From: Ancha Bala-Gaye u <bala7500@mach1.wlu.ca>
To: Gambia <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: RE: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.3.89.9712191242.A11066-0100000@mach1.wlu.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I'ld like to thank Paul, Soffie and everyone that contributed
to the topic of women and men in the kitchen and wife beatings. On the
topic of racial discrimination, I think Soffie, Pa Musa and Mr Payne have
done excellent jobs. And Asbjorn has raised some very interesting points.
I think that Asbjorn was looking at the issue at the individual level,
which is as it should be, but which is not the current situation. As I
mentioned before on this same topic of race, I believe that humans like
to categorise even before the colonial ists came into the picture. We
categorise at different levels and put down others we think of as
competitors, at whatever level, to make ourselves feel better (eg GAmbia
and Senegal rivalry has beeen around for a very long time).
I think some Blacks, esp. in North America etc feel that they should be
the ones to encourage each other cause no one else will do it for them
(Right now, I would have to agree with them. Again there are exceptions
to every rule)
Some even take this further, saying that because of the slave trade and
racial discrimination Blacks tend to go through, then we should all get
along. In this instance they forget that not all family members
get along, rather than groups of people from different
backgrounds. Even Blacks in the US categorise, for eg,
there are
Blacks who are "sellouts" and there are those that " keep it real". This
trend goes on across all groups of people. I think that one of the ways to
help with this problem is
for parents to educate their kids about relating to others on the individual
level. One of the issues that Moe's friend raised was, why Africans are
not reaching out to African-Americans. This made me smile cause
I'm thinking, we can't even solve our own problems and keep our people
together. So I can't even think about us, trying to reach
out to another group of people who also have their own problems. As things
stand, that would be a very chaotic environment.
I think dealing with people individually, instead of in groups, will be
a key solution.
Ancha.



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 19:09:39 GMT0BST
From: "Sikkaaka" <ley5mc1@nottingham.ac.uk>
To: "Malanding S. Jaiteh" <msjaiteh@mtu.edu>, gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <4E07FC15C81@hermes.nottingham.ac.uk>

list managers,
could you please remove me from the list over the vacation period.
Thanks and greetigs to all members.
Salam,
Elhaj.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 16:41:04 -0500
From: nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: NINETEEN STUDENTS FROM BANJUL ACADEMY STILL DON'T HAVE THEIR
Message-ID: <19971219.164106.3422.0.nahak@juno.com>

Can anyone provide me with the following information regarding this case:
The name and address of the school, date when the projects were examined,
names and address of the 19 students, a copy of the letter of denial from
West African Examination Council (WAEC) and name of the director. As soon
as I receive the above information, I will make my contact with the high
officials in The Gambia.
Please, let's be more diplomatic. Peace!!!!!!

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 20:25:20 -0000
From: "tgr@commit.gm" <gambia-l@commit.gm>
To: "Gambia-L" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Farafenni Hospital
Message-ID: <B0000026778@south.commit.gm>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sent by "Torstein Grotnes" <tgr@commit.gm>
via Commit


Hello Gambia L'ers.

I just talked to a friend who is a fysiotherapist residing in The Gambia.
He told me about the new beautiful Farafenni Hospital building complex.
It has been ready he told me for something like six months, and officially
opened I think.
Despite that it seems that the only inhibitants of the hospital currently
is one janitor and two watchmen..
It there anybody who knows why the hospital is not operating (no pun
intended) yet?
Is there a lack of funding and personell??
Can anybody do something about it?

Regards,
Tosh
The Gambia



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 17:16:17 PST
From: "sillah conateh" <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
Message-ID: <19971220011617.5621.qmail@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain

Fellow Gambians,

I firmly believe that the only way we can solve our motherland's
numerous problems is not just to be sitting in foreign countries and
talk, talk, talk! But the solution is that we should all have the
interest of the nation by going back and contributing to its meaningful
development. Most people missed The Gambia for decades and do not know
anything about the place. This is terrible!

We all need to go back after we obtain our degrees and develop the
roads, hospitals, airports, seaports, schools, our local folks, and many
more so that we can make it The "SINGAPORE OF WEST AFRICA". ha! ha!

Wishing all a Happy Christmas and a Wonderful New Year.

Sillah.

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 21:24:22 -0800
From: Paul <bgibba@interlog.com>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
Message-ID: <3.0.2.32.19971219212422.0068c13c@mail.interlog.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Mr. Conateh,
You are absolutely right. That is the only way out and I fully support
your idea.
Paul.



At 05:16 PM 12/19/97 PST, you wrote:
>Fellow Gambians,
>
>I firmly believe that the only way we can solve our motherland's
>numerous problems is not just to be sitting in foreign countries and
>talk, talk, talk! But the solution is that we should all have the
>interest of the nation by going back and contributing to its meaningful
>development. Most people missed The Gambia for decades and do not know
>anything about the place. This is terrible!
>
>We all need to go back after we obtain our degrees and develop the
>roads, hospitals, airports, seaports, schools, our local folks, and many
>more so that we can make it The "SINGAPORE OF WEST AFRICA". ha! ha!
>
>Wishing all a Happy Christmas and a Wonderful New Year.
>
>Sillah.
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 20:37:45 -0600
From: "Katim S. Touray" <dekat@itis.com>
To: "Gambia-l" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
Subject: Suspending Gambia-L subscriptions
Message-ID: <199712200244.UAA03582@tower.itis.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi folks,

happy holidays!! i hope everyone is doing fine, and getting ready for the
Christmas or Ramadan (take your pick).

i'm writing help those of us who'd like to suspend receiving mail from
Gambia-L. i notice a number of people have sent out "Please unsubscribe
me" type messages to the list. the problem is that it won't be easy for
the list managers to keep up with the requests, even if they wanted to.
given that it's not really hard for one to unscribe from the list, or
suspend mail delivery, i see no reason why list managers should be bothered
with such chores.

so here's what you should do:

1. if you want to *really* unsubscribe, send an email to:
LISTPROC@U.WASHINGTON.EDU (you can also use small letters)
with the message:
unsubscribe gambia-l
alternatively, you can say:
signoff gambia-l
please note that you should leave your "Subject" field bland in all your
messages to LISTPROC.

and if you want to resubscribe again, you can just go through the managers.
obviously, if your objective is to just suspend getting mail from
Gambia-L, you would want to try something else. this is because a list
manager has to subscribe you back to the list. to avoid creating extra
work for the list managers, you should use option 2 (below) if you want to
suspend your mail from the list.

2a. to postpone suspend getting mail from Gambia-L, send mail to:
LISTPROC@U.WASHINGTON.EDU (the same address given above, and again, you
can use small letters) with the message:
set gambia-l mail postpone
you will receive an e-mail confirming your new setting for Gambia-L.

2b. to turn you mail delivery back on, send an e-mail to the above address,
with the message:
set gambia-l mail

note that as opposed to 2a, the "set" command used in 2b does not have
"postpone" after "gambia-l" neither does it have anything like "resume" or
"restart." by leaving "postpone" out, you are in effect defaulting to
getting mail. in other words, if don't say "postpone", it means you want
mail.

i'll leave it at that for now. please let me know if you have any
questions. have a great weekend, a MERRY CHRISTMAS, and a HAPPY NEW YEAR.
and my sympathies to all the Jobes and Ceesays now crying about the
on-coming Ramdan!

Katim


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 19:49:55 -0800 (PST)
From: "Ousainou Demba - EECS (EE214)" <odemba@eecs.wsu.edu>
To: Gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Unlist
Message-ID: <Pine.HPP.3.95.971219194123.26298A-100000@ren.eecs.wsu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


Can you please kindly unlist me from 12/19/97 to 1/18/98,because i will be
away for christmas break.This is my e-mail address Odemba@eecs.wsu.edu.
Have a happy holiday.


Thanks

Ousainou Demba.





------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 22:51:53 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Help needed!
Message-ID: <9712200351.AA36536@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Mr. Payne,

Merci beaucoup!

You provided me with more information about sources than what I could ever
imagine. I spent 2 hours at Georgia State University library
yesterday,prior to asking for help, but could not find half the sources
you suggested because I didn't quite know what I was looking for. This is
a great start!

Once again, thank you very much. Thank you also to my Tomaa, Momodou
Camara in Denmark. I hope you are not under so many feet of snow :-))))).

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 23:00:35 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Racial Discrimination (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712200400.AA36360@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Ancha, you wrote:

> On the
> topic of racial discrimination, I think Soffie, Pa Musa and Mr Payne have
> done excellent jobs. And Asbjorn has raised some very interesting points.
> I think that Asbjorn was looking at the issue at the individual level,
> which is as it should be, but which is not the current situation.

Yes, they sure did a wonderful job of analyzing the contents of the
subject. Asbjorn too needs a pat on the back for raising his points as he
has every right to justify his own personal feelings and opinions.

Thank you and happy holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 23:04:34 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Interfaith Relations in Our Own Back Yard (fwd)
Message-ID: <9712200404.AA36454@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I just hope that Dr. Nyang wouldn't mind me sharing this article with the
list members.

Thank you.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

> ----------------
> Hartford Seminary
>
> Interfaith Relations in Our Own Back Yard
>
> Sulayman Nyang takes the global issue of interfaith relations and gives it
> a local face. In January Nyang began serving as the first Visiting
> Professor in Abrahamic Religions for the Luce Forum in Abrahamic
> Religions, a cooperative program between Hartford Seminary's Macdonald
> Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations and the
> University of Hartford's Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies.
>
> Nyang himself is the embodiment of multicultural and interfaith
> commitment. A native of Gambia who is a Muslim raised and educated by
> Irish Catholic nuns and priests, Nyang has served as professor of African
> Studies at Howard University and as president of the Greater Washington
> Interfaith Conference. He served as a Gambian diplomat in Saudi Arabia for
> three years.
>
> His international perspective as a scholar and advocate for interfaith
> engagement does not mean, however, that he is unaware of the interfaith
> issues that exist within local communities. For example, he recently led a
> discussion in Springfield between members of the local Jewish community
> and some followers of the Nation of Islam. Through his diplomacy and
> objectivity, Nyang helped the two groups keep open the lines of
> communication, despite their widely divergent views.
>
> In the context of the broader local community, Nyang is passionate about
> the need for many different sectors of our society -- academic, religious,
> government and business -- to work together for the social justice that
> can thrive only when a community experiences religious and cultural
> understanding and tolerance.
>
> "We must learn to reach past the 'town and gown' distinctions," Nyang
> recently told a small gathering at a Hartford Seminary Faculty Collegial
> Sharing session. "The city fathers must appreciate that educational
> institutions such as Hartford Seminary are now brokers between the local
> community and the world community. If your local neighbors don't view you
> as a good Christian, or Muslim or Jew, you will not be effective or
> celebrated globally."
>
> Acknowledging what he calls "the CNN factor," Nyang said Hartford Seminary
> plays a critical role in interpreting religious trends to the secular
> world.
>
> "Because of telecommunications and the globalization of information, in
> some ways the world gets weird and bizarre," he laughs. "The Heaven's Gate
> tragedy can give the world a wrong impression of American religion by
> 'telescoping' isolated incidents that are only part of the picture." The
> combination of the Seminary's ecumenical understanding of various faiths,
> coupled with its capacity for rigorous intellectual analysis, makes it
> ideally suited to promoting understanding, Nyang believes.
>
> "The Luce professorship has created a bridge," he says. "Hartford Seminary
> is known as a pioneering place in the understanding of all religions. The
> Muslim press is now reporting on Hartford Seminary's work, and this is
> part of the globalization. And while faith will always be a personal
> choice, democratic principles are important to true interfaith dialogue
> because they respect the authenticity and dignity of other peoples."
>
> Nyang sees clear evidence of this in Hartford, where "there is a need for
> greater bridge-building" between Christians and Muslims and between
> immigrant Muslims and African-American Muslims.
>
> "Immigrant Muslims bring to America their own faith and so here, Islam is
> colored by national and ethnic backgrounds," Nyang says. "Consequently,
> immigrant Muslims' reaction to Christians is affected by geographical
> frames of reference. In contrast, African-American Muslims see Islam as a
> system challenging the American way of thinking affected by the history of
> slavery and is therefore colored by racial considerations."
>
> Hartford Seminary can be a place of hospitality for many faith
> communities, says Nyang.
>
> "It's a place where people can get to know eachother's 'mental
> furniture'," he says. "And harmony occurs when we understand the way
> another's thinking is arranged."
>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 23:10:33 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: NINETEEN STUDENTS FROM BANJUL ACADEMY STILL DON'T HAVE THEIR
Message-ID: <9712200410.AA32542@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

>
> Dear Bantaba Members,
> I would like the list members to
> know that nineteen Arts students from Banjul Academy, a new High
> school under the influence of Mr. I.M.L Drammeh (Principal) were
> denied having their O'level results. However, according to one of the
> students', Lamin S. Fadera; who has been following his result from
> the school has been told by the principal that West African
> Examination Council (WAEC) had reasonable doubt on whether the
> students have done Arts & Craft practical work on their own. The
> principal then asked Lamin to go home and wait until they have final
> statement from the examination council.

This is really *NOT* good news for these pupils. What is the Education
Department's reaction to these allegations of cheating? Please, provide
more information if you can.

Thank you.

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 23:20:17 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Question...
Message-ID: <9712200420.AA41352@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Mr. Gomez, you wrote:

> Why did the Europeans come to Africa? What made them think
> that they can write our own history? Why did they decide to write African
> history? Will the history they write be favorable to us or to them? Was
> the history written in African point of view or European point of view?
> What is the purpose of the history?

These are all valid questions, but where do we find the answers if we do
not have our own written history books to consult. I do not think Oral
History alone can answer the question you raised above. Nonetheless, your
questions are worth thinking about.

Thank you and happy holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 23:26:30 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
Message-ID: <9712200426.AA36452@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

>
> I firmly believe that the only way we can solve our motherland's
> numerous problems is not just to be sitting in foreign countries and
> talk, talk, talk! But the solution is that we should all have the
> interest of the nation by going back and contributing to its meaningful
> development. Most people missed The Gambia for decades and do not know
> anything about the place. This is terrible!
>
> We all need to go back after we obtain our degrees and develop the
> roads, hospitals, airports, seaports, schools, our local folks, and many
> more so that we can make it The "SINGAPORE OF WEST AFRICA". ha! ha!

Aye...Aye...Aye.

Mr. Conateh, you are very perceptive! And your advice may fall on deaf
ears but it is worth listening to.

Thank you and happy holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 20 Dec 1997 00:37:58 -0500 (EST)
From: mjallow@st6000.sct.edu (Modou Jallow)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: AMISTAD
Message-ID: <9712200537.AA21394@st6000.sct.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Hey to all the movie-goers out there,

Have you seen the movie AMISTAD yet? What are your comments on the scene,
setting and characters? How about your personal reactions? Did it make you
feel like going outside to find a "white" person to slap? (joke).
Actually, A Senegalese brother once told me that on the first day the film
ROOTS was shown on TV, some Senegalese who saw it actually went out and
physically attacked some white people in Dakar. I do not know how true
that was but I could imagine the temptation.

Anyway, my question about this movie is: what benefits will Africans,
especially the Sierra Leoneans (since the characters are based on them )
get out of it? Perhaps, we can parallel it to the film ROOTS by Alex
Haley. How did this film influence the Gambia?

Well, Unfortunately, I have not seen AMISTAD yet but I heard that it is a
very powerful film. Hopefully, I will find some time during the Christmas
weekend to go see it. Who wants to be my date for the occasion? Just
kidding.....my wife would skin me alive :-)))).

Have a great weekend!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow
=======================================================================
mjallow@sct.edu mjallow@hayes.edu
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 20 Dec 1997 14:28:56 +2000
From: mmjeng@image.dk
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: SV: Babading Sissoho
Message-ID: <199712201329.OAA24411@mail.image.dk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-transfer-encoding: Quoted-printable

> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 09:21:59 +0100
> Reply-to: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> From: Asbj=F8rn Nordam <asbjorn.nordam@dif.dk>
> To: GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List <gam=
bia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Subject: SV: Babading Sissoho
> X-To: "'gambia-l@u.washington.edu'" <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>

> Friends, at the fantastic Yundum airport, while I was waiting for a
> plane, I counted 9 big planes, all of them belonging to Mr. Sissoho. He
> must be rich, because I was told that they were not frequently
> operating. We know from the competition among the national
> flight-compagnies in Europe, that it is costy every hour the plane is
> parked. Rumours (which one should not spread) was saying, that Mr.
> Sissoho didn=B4t pay, or have not payed for long time, for the
> airport-service and parking of his planes in Yundum. So .... Asbj=F8rn
> Nordam
>
> > ----------
> > Fra: Momodou Camara[SMTP:nijii@hotmail.com]
> > Svar til: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
> > Sendt: 12. december 1997 08:46
> > Til: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List
> > Emne: Re: Babading Sissoho
> >
> >
> > >
> > >Today while talking to a friend of mine in the Gambia,I was told that
> >
> > Mr
> > >Sissoho ,the Malian-Gambian millionaire had a very large and warm
> > >welcome in Banjul with jubilations everywhere. He promised to help
> > The
> > >Gambia a lot of money in the improvements of the Airport and related
> > >projects. This is good news for the Gambian business community and
> > >confidence building of the country. I hope he will keep his promise .
> > >The more the investment money, the better for us.
> > >He also gave the soccer teams of Gambia and Mali much needed
> > financial
> > >help.
> > >
> > >Habib Ghanim
> > >
> >
> > It is stated in one of the FOROYAA issues recently that Mr. Sissoho
> > ows
> > four million dalasis to the Gambia including the Civil Aviation.
> >
> > Momodou Camara
> >
> >
> > ______________________________________________________
> > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
> >


The following is from the point newspaper issue of Monday December
15, 1997.


> Retrenchment At Air Dabia
According to an official at Air Dabia, the company has over the
weekend retrenched about 40 people.
He said that business has not been good with the carrier and it had
made operational loses due to poor traffic it had to cope with since
it started operations here.
On what`s next on the agenda of the company, the source said that Air
Dabia will be retructured with a streamlined staff and new marketing
strategies for better prospects.
Asked why give the sack to these people now that Mr. Sissoho is here,
the source replied that it was just a coincidence as the move had
been planned for a long time.
Reacting to allegations that the company had failed to pay its staff
for the past 3 months or so, the source denied them en bloc claiming
that, that has never been the case at Air Dabia.
This paper contacted some of the senior officials of the airline that
have been affected by the move but they declined to comment. They
further asked us to contact the management for further clarification.

Have a nice weekend
Greetings
Matarr M. Jeng.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 20 Dec 1997 15:37:23 +2000
From: mmjeng@image.dk
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Banjulians Discover "Oil Wells" At Half Die
Message-ID: <199712201438.PAA32589@mail.image.dk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

The following is from my copy of the point newspaper of Thursday
11th. December 1997.

Banjulians Discover "Oil Wells" At Half Die.
Geologists call for caution
The sudden discovery of Kerosene wells at the half die mangroves has
been the focus of the people of that area.
The site has been for the past 5 days the port of call for many
Banjulians of various ages who have been taken regular supply of the
fuel for both domestic use and sale in the case of young boys who are
said to have discovered the booty.
On hearing, the news, the point visited the site behind ICE school`s
annex. On arrival, this reporter was hit by the scent of Kerosene all
over the place where a caretaker from the Half Die primary school was
found with some boys helping themselves with the liquid that was
coming out from holes dug by the people.
When contacted, he said he was sent by the headmaster to collect
parraffin for the cleaning of the school`s toilets.
The caretaker asserted that he has seen people who had managed to
collect as much as four gallons of the liquid. Some, he explained,
have sold their booty to shopkeepers while others mostly older people
have been using the fuel for their hurricane lamps.
The reporter asked a teacher in the area whether he tought the
Kerosene leaked from the nearby shell tanks, but he expressed his
doubt about such a possibility as there was no possible path linking
the two sites.
Whe contacted sources at the Geological Unit recommended caution.
They warned that people should not be misled to belive that some oil
was in the area. They cited similar cases in the provinces where
similar situations had arisen. However it was later discovered that
wells of fuel there stemmed from leakages during the hey days trading
seasons of the past.
They did not also rule out that the proximity of the Shell tanks
could have made it possible for people to find the liquid in the said
area. They also warned that they are not even sure whether it is
Kerosene or not because the chemical composition of the liquid is yet
to be determined, whether it is some form of hydrocarbon or not but
investigations are being carried out.

Wish you all a nice weekend.
Greetings
Matarr M. Jeng.
















------------------------------

Date: Sat, 20 Dec 1997 11:12:38 -0500
From: nahak@juno.com (Michael J Gomez)
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: Question...
Message-ID: <19971220.111240.3614.0.nahak@juno.com>

These are all valid questions, but where do we find the answers if we do
not have our own written history books to consult. I do not think Oral
History alone can answer the question you raised above. Nonetheless, your
questions are worth thinking about.
Thank you and happy holidays!

Regards,
Moe S. Jallow

Mr. Jallow,
Thank you for making the above comment. My question to your comment is
that have we as Africans ever find the answers to our societal problems
by reading written history by the Europeans? If yes, what are the
answers? If no, Why? Can we as Africans become self sustainable without
Valuing our Own History?
Some of us may not even be aware or conscious of the fact that, we were
socialized by the Europeans to devalue our own history. One of the
reasons why they did it is for them to able to control us so that we can
become dependent on them. They have succeeded in doing it. Why? Even
today, most Africans believe that our Oral history is not valid just
because it is not written in Books. Our history was in the form of Oral,
Digging, Nature and Culture. To me this type of history gives me more
answers than the written history by the Europeans. It helps me to
understand and appreciate my society. It also empowers me to find
possible solutions to our societal problems. The written history by the
Europeans empowers us to condemn our societies as well as our leaders so
that we can remain to be divided and they will still continue to control
us and dictate our Public Policy. Some of us do this unconsciously and
because of this it hinders sustainable development in any African Nation.
Our Oral, Digging, Nature and Culture History is OUR ROOTS and devaluing
it will make us to become empty and weak to become more creative in
developing our nations. One of the ways in which we get our own history
is by going back to our nations, interview elders in both rural and
urban. To sustain it we can write or use cassettes and videos to tape
it. We can have these people come to our schools to teach both teachers
and students about our history. It should be part of our schools
curriculum from elementary to colleges and universities in Africa. By
doing this we will open a positive dialogs in dealing with our societal
problems. To be strong and sustainable , we must build on with what we
have and not just to des card it. In the name of ALLAH, may we all be
blessed.

Michae B.B.J. Gomez
Bakalarr Village, N.B.D.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 21 Dec 1997 11:36:02 +1200
From: Saikou B M Njai <sbn13@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>
To: gambia-l@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
Message-ID: <133A647254B@cad.canterbury.ac.nz>

> Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 17:16:17 -0800 (PST)
> From: sillah conateh <sillahconateh@hotmail.com>
> Subject: THE ONLY SOLUTION!
> To: "GAMBIA-L: The Gambia and Related Issues Mailing List"
> <gambia-l@u.washington.edu>
> Reply-to: gambia-l@u.washington.edu

> Fellow Gambians,
>
> I firmly believe that the only way we can solve our motherland's
> numerous problems is not just to be sitting in foreign countries and
> talk, talk, talk! But the solution is that we should all have the
> interest of the nation by going back and contributing to its meaningful
> development. Most people missed The Gambia for decades and do not know
> anything about the place. This is terrible!
>
> We all need to go back after we obtain our degrees and develop the
> roads, hospitals, airports, seaports, schools, our local folks, and many
> more so that we can make it The "SINGAPORE OF WEST AFRICA". ha! ha!
>
> Wishing all a Happy Christmas and a Wonderful New Year.
>
> Sillah.
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
> I agree with Sillah that the only way our home land can change
according to our wishes is if we are prepared to go back participate
physically . We must be ready to sacrifice our lives, confort and do
what ever it takes to build an ideal society for us. The coutries in
which we are living now have gone through the stages that our nation
is going through now. It was through the unconpromising effforts
the pioneers of those countries that they are enjoying
today. Let us not fool our selves that we will be able to run things
from outside. There is more political awareness in the Gambia now
than ever before and we can further build on that by being there and
talking to our sisters and brothers. It is our duty to go back and
share our expieriences with them and do what ever we can to develop
our nation.
Awareness is the key to a democratic society. If the people are
aware and conscious of thier rights the leaders must act justly
because they know they will not get away with injustice. In many
parts of Africa leaders continue to be unjust because they know they
can get away with it. The people still believe that the Leader is
above the people and they cann't do anything about what they do,
As long as this wrong concept remains, we cannot have a democratic
society.
I wish you all a merry chrismas and a happy new year.
Saikou B M Njai
Postgraduate Student Room E311
Department of Civil Engineering
University of Canterbury
P M B 4800
Christchurch,N Z

------------------------------

End of GAMBIA-L Digest 99
*************************
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