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 Decrimilise skin bleaching in Gambia.
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toubab1020



10681 Posts

Posted - 27 Jun 2020 :  00:55:51  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
RELATED:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-49851669

AND:https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/23/skin-lightening-creams-are-dangerous-yet-business-is-booming-can-the-trade-be-stopped
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https://standard.gm/govt-to-legalise-skin-bleaching/

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June 26, 2020


As part of his attempts at social engineering, head of state Yahya Jammeh passed a law which came into effect on 1st January 1996 prohibiting the importation, sale, possession and use of skin bleaching in The Gambia.

Now, The Gambia government is trying to push through a bill at the National Assembly to repeal that law and effectively legalise skin bleaching in the country.
The Skin Bleaching (Prohibition) Repeal Bill, 2020 had its first reading at parliament Monday and will be tabled for a second reading by the attorney general on Thursday, 2nd July.

The bill as seen by The Standard outlined that the skin bleaching prohibition law was “found to be discriminatory against women and girls in The Gambia in furtherance of The Gambia’s international obligations and in line with the Constitution…”.

In its expressed objectives and reasons justifying the expungement of the skin bleaching prohibition law, the drafters noted: “This bill is the first of its kind in Africa for being the trailblazer for the recognition, observance and domestication of international obligations and commitments relating to women’s rights into domestic law. Since the enactment of the Women’s Act 2010, significant strides have been made to enforce the law and to protect women in line with the provisions of the Act. Section 25 of the Women’s Act recognized the need for periodic review of legislation every ten years to ensure further compliance with our international obligations as enshrined in the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (Cedaw), and the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People’s Right on the Rights of Women in Africa. This amendment is intended to review and amend the provisions of this Act that are discriminatory against women as mandated by Section 25 of the Women’s Act.”

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

toubab1020



10681 Posts

Posted - 28 Jun 2020 :  10:57:32  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I found the following links particually interesting,could this have anything to do with the proposed legislation.

I have supplied sourse links only,to save the unnecessary use of bandwith in Bantaba in Cyberspage

What do you think Dear Reader,maybe a post with your opnion ?

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https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/skin-lightening-products-market



https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/global-currents/profiting-from-the-skin-lightening-trade


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"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 28 Jun 2020 13:20:33
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toubab1020



10681 Posts

Posted - 17 Jul 2020 :  12:31:56  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
RELATED: https://standard.gm/govts-plan-to-legalise-skin-bleaching-on-the-balance/

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https://foroyaa.net/governments-attempt-to-decriminalize-skin-bleaching-faces-resistance/

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By Momodou Jarju on July 16, 2020


The Government of The Gambia’s attempt to repeal a law criminalizing skin bleaching has resistance as majority of lawmakers on Thursday refused to support the bill.

Those who said No sounded loudest and on the contrary to those who said Aye.

The repealing of the 24-year-old law which is sponsored by current Government of President Adama Barrow was presented before the national assembly in June and the debate on its merits and principles took place on Thursday July 16, 2020.

According to the decree, a person who bleaches his or her skin commits an offence and is liable on conviction to a fine of 5,000.

Deputy Speaker, Momodou Sanneh, put the question for voting more than three times before saying “the Nos’ have it.”

Attorney General and Minister for Justice, Dawda A. Jallow, thought the bill would not be contentious. However, he clarified that the bill was a decree and was not brought before the assembly for debate on the merits and principles in 1996 when it was passed.

Minister Jallow said the law is no longer serving the intended purpose for which it was meant for.

The bill was committed to the Committee Stage, the third stage, thereafter it would be taken back to the plenary for the third reading for possible consideration or approval. The Justice Minister however reserve the right to either withdraw the bill if he so wishes at this stage.

Member for Busumbala, Saikouba Jarju; Member for Illiassa, Demba Camara; Member for Foni Kansala, Amul Nyassi; Member for Tallingding, Fatoumatta Jawara, are among those who did not support the repealing of the bill.

The opponents of the bill argued that skin bleaching is harmful to human health, and is not good to the users and those who enacted the decree did it with good intentions.

Some of them even said it is the business and problem of the executive because it is their duty to enforce laws, while it is their duty to make those laws.

Halifa Sallah, who is one of the proponents for the repeal of the bill, has on several occasions called for observations from members while they were deliberating for clarification and was granted except one by Niamina East lawmaker, Omar Ceesay.

Sallah-and-co argued that enforcing such a degree could cause problems. They said it would be difficult for the executive to arrest everybody who is bleaching, charged and prosecuted them

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 19 Jul 2020 09:44:36
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toubab1020



10681 Posts

Posted - 24 Jul 2020 :  12:29:45  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote


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https://foroyaa.net/how-is-criminalisation-of-skin-bleaching-to-be-interpreted/

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QUESTION OF THE DAY

The act of bleaching the natural skin of a human being is destructive to the user. Does society criminalise all behaviour that is harmful to the individual? The answer to this question is in the negative. This is why Smoking cigarette is not criminalise. However , one may criminalise smoking in public places to prevent a smoker from disturbing non- smokers to discourage cigarette smoking. In short , law making is not an ordinary exercise. The power to have human beings arrested and detained against their will should not be exercised without the restraint of justice, reason and mercy.

Intention matters when it comes to criminalisation of behaviour. When a behaviour is motivated by the desire to harm self or other persons and a person engages in action to harm or attempt to harm others, that behaviour could be criminalised.

Most people who engage in skin bleaching conceive it as a symbol of beauty. Some eventually realise the destructiveness of the practice to health but find it difficult to reverse the process because of the odd appearance they would have when they cease using the cream.

If one criminalises skin bleaching, all those who engage in the practice would have to be arrested, detained and subjected to trial. They would have criminal records which would affect their lives for ever. This cannot be in the interest of the individual or the society at large. A person who has no desire to harm others should not be transformed into a criminal.


"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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