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 LIFE OF THE RURAL PEOPLE GAMBIA
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 15 Aug 2018 :  21:36:37  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote

Like many life enhancing projects of NEW GAMBIA excellent though they are MONEY is not available to commence works.
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This Column is meant to monitor and report on issues that concerns the people of the rural communities, in terms of how their development is hindered or facilitated.

Rural development is a process that aims to improve the standard of living of people, living in rural communities.

According to Robert chambers, rural development is a strategy that enables a specific group of people, poor rural women and men, gain for themselves and their children, more of what they want and need.

It involves helping the poorest among those who seek a livelihood in rural communities, to demand and control more of the benefits of rural development. The group includes small scale farmers, tenants and the landless. Thus, the term rural development may be used to imply any one of the above-mentioned connotations.
A Patient been Transported to hospital on bicycle

To avoid the ineffective floundering among the myriad of definitions, we shall define rural development as a process leading to the sustainable improvement in the quality of life of rural people, especially the poor.

According to Lamin Sambou Kinteh, for rural development to be meaningful and realizable, the trinity of development must be present such as electricity, water and rural infrastructural development like roads, industries, schools, health facilities, etc.

The people of Sabach Sanjal District have again raised their voices on the poor road network in their District, during a visit to the area by this Columnist in the month of July 2018.

According to the people of the District, it is a nightmare travelling to villages that are off the Farafenni / Laminkoto highway, due to the unmotorable situation of the roads. Commenting on the issue, Mamudou Jallow pointed out that the feeder road that stretches from Sabach Soukoto to Bambali, was built by the EDF in the late 70s and since then, the road has not been maintained or re-constructed. This road he said, is unmotorable particularly during this rainy season.

Jallow ponted out that good road network, facilitates the movement of people, allowing their social interaction within the District; but that in their case, they are completely left behind.

Demba Sowe informed this Columnist that due to the unmotorable situation of the roads in the District, drivers only stop at strategic points like Dibba Kunda, Secken or NGayen and the passengers who live in villages like Sinchu Pallen and have goods to transport, have to hire a donkey or horse cart to transport them.

This hiring of donkey or horse cart, Sowe said, increases the prices of the goods which is passed on to the consumers.

“A good road network is essential not only for connecting villages with business centres, but improving connectivity with isolated local communities, where public transport options are limited or not available, reducing the high transport cost on people,” he stated.

Rural Development advocates are of the view that connecting geographic locations through road networks, facilitate the transportation and movement of people, goods, and services. Thus enhancing rural welfare.

It is an incontestable fact that good road networks play a crucial role in the economic development of developing countries, particularly in rural communities where agricultural workers who need to transport their produce to markets, dominate.

Good road networks help reduce the travel time between two places, increase the frequency of transportation network and hence reduce travel costs.

What is the plan of the New Government with regard to the poor road network in Sabach Sanjal? The Minister of Works, Construction and Infrastructure, has visited the place. The question that is on people’s lips is, when will work begin on these feeder roads begin?

http://foroyaa.gm/life-of-the-rural-people-gambia-53-makng-rural-gambia-conducive-to-human-habitation-part-eight-roads/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 29 Aug 2018 :  22:07:16  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Some interesting ideas, BUT I think the implementation of some of the suggestions will lead to confusion between "herders" and farmers,it appears to me that the "herders" from that I take it to mean,those who own cattle and not those who are stockmen,(those that look after the cattle on behalf of their owners) A culture has been in existance for very many years where cattlemen have alwats considered themselves in some way superior to those who farm the land.
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August 28, 2018

This Column is meant to monitor and report on issues that concerns the people of the rural communities, in terms of how their development is hindered or facilitated. Rural development is a process that aims to improve the standard of living of people in the rural communities.

According to Robert chambers, rural development is a strategy that enables a specific group of people, poor rural women and men, gain for themselves and their children, more of what they want and need.

It involves helping the poorest among those who seek a livelihood in rural communities, to demand and control more of the benefits of rural development. The group includes small scale farmers, tenants and the landless.

Thus the term rural development, may be used to imply any one of the above-mentioned connotations.

To avoid the ineffective floundering among the myriad of definitions, we shall define rural development as a process leading to sustainable improvement in the quality of life of rural people, especially the poor. According to Lamin Sambou Kinteh, for rural development to be meaningful and realizable, the trinity of development such as electricity, water and rural infrastructural development like roads, industries, schools, health facilities etc., must be present.

Livestock production in The Gambia is still based on the traditional low input free range system, where cattle is herded during the day and tethered on the outskirts of villages during the night.

This system is dependent on natural pasture as feed source for the animals and hence access routes to these grazing and watering points are crucial. Nowadays, due to factors such as population increase of both human and livestock, lack of land use planning, and unsustainable exploitation and use of natural resources, has caused settlements and crop farms to extend into rangelands, reducing grazing space and restricting access to grazing areas. This has resulted into seasonal livestock feed deficits which is a great constraint to livestock development and a concern for livestock farmers. Improvement and security of rangelands and routes are most invaluable, to the increase livestock production in the country today.

Such routes were identified by communities concerned, with the consent of members in the form of a written agreement, signed by all. The routes have been demarcated wide enough to satisfy the requirement of both farmers and herders. The sites have been geo-referenced so that they permanently exist on maps and are marked with concrete pillars to define the boundaries for sustainability.

Since 2009, a total of 216 kilometres of stock route have been demarcated at PROGEBE primary sites (Kiang West, Niamina East, Nianija and seceondary sites (Kombo East and Sami) and adjacent districts (Upper and Lower Saloum, Niani, Fulladu and Niamina West). Management Committees have been established and management protocols developed to ensure their proper use, to prevent and address conflict situations. An impact assessment after three years revealed that community members especially crop and livestock farmers, benefited from increased production as a result of improved access to pasture and reduced crop damage. There has been significant drop in conflict between herders and crop farmers as well as Court cases related to such issues. To ensure sustainability of the routes, proper Land use and allocation planning was promoted allowing communities to draw their own land.

There should be policy directives involving Regional and Local authorities to institutionalize land use planning at the community level, including the demarcation of routes and grazing areas by setting clear and permanent boundaries. The department of livestock services and other livestock related projects, should capitalize on the PROGEBE experience and replicate this process in other areas of the country, to avoid conflict between crop and livestock farmers.

http://foroyaa.gm/life-of-the-rural-people-gambia-53-makng-rural-gambia-conducive-for-human-habitation-part-nine-proper-land-use-policy-needed/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 12 Sep 2018 :  18:11:48  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have been to a rural village on the North Bank where there was an AMBULANCE posted,unfortunately this vehicle was out of use,why? because it was the ONLY motorised transport in the village ,it had been used other than to take the sick to a health facility resulting in NO fuel being available,needless to say there was no garage or fuel for many miles,as usual NO money to buy fuel this was 3 years ago MAYBE a NEW culture has developed since then ? ! or more likely NOT.

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September 11, 2018
This Column is meant to monitor and report on issues that concerns people of rural communities, in terms of how their development is hindered or facilitated. Rural development is a process that aims to improve the standard of living of people, living in rural communities.

According to Robert Chambers, rural development is a strategy that enables a specific group of people, poor rural women and men, gain for themselves and their children, more of what they want and need. It involves helping the poorest among those who seek a livelihood in rural communities, to demand and control more of the benefits of rural development. The group includes small scale farmers, tenants and the landless.

Thus, the term rural development may be used to imply any one of the above-mentioned connotations.

To avoid the ineffective floundering among the myriad of definitions, we shall define rural development as a process leading to sustainable improvement in the quality of life of rural people, especially the poor.

According to Lamin Sambou Kinteh, for rural development to be meaningful and realizable, the trinity of development must be present such as electricity, water and rural infrastructural development like roads, industries, Schools, health facilities etc.

Women on the northern bank of rural Gambia, have decried the high cost of transportation to reach health facilities by women in labour and call on the authorities to come to their aid.

According to the women who spoke to this reporter, they encounter financial and physical difficulties to reach the nearest health facility in Farafeni, which is eleven kilometres away from their village of Balingho, in Illiassa District and twenty three kilometres from Maka Balla Manneh to Essau Lower Nuimi.

The women asserted that due to the poor condition of the road, vehicles do not frequently ply the area especially during the rains, and as such, one needs to hire the services of a donkey cart if one is suffering from illness that is not associated to pregnancy.

In case of pregnancy, they said the service of the donkey cart is risky; that in such a case, one has to hire the service of a vehicle, which is expensive.

A middle age woman from Balingho informed this Columnist, that when she was in labour, she was asked to pay D600, to be taken to Farafeni General Hospital by a driver, in the month of September, at a time when her husband was thinking of feeding the family in the lean period.

This she said, led her husband to take loan to pay the vehicle, which she said increased the poverty of her husband since he had to pay back, by selling his produce.

Fatou Sumareh also informed this Columnist that her brother’s wife who was also in labour, had to be transported to Essau at a cost; that this was very costly and tedious since they had to hire a horse cart to Ngundu Kebbeh and a vehicle to Essau.

The women called on the Ministry of Health to assist them with means of reaching health facilities at a minimal cost, taking into consideration the level of poverty in rural communities, particularly during the lean period.

http://foroyaa.gm/life-of-the-rural-people-gambia-53-making-rural-gambia-conducive-for-human-habitation-part-ten-high-cost-of-transportation-to-reach-a-health-facility/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 17 Sep 2018 :  14:15:55  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think that Bantaba in cyberspace is read by some very powerful people and their minds have been put into gear to apply some ideas that they had never even thought about I really look forward to experiencing the NEW action packed Gambia of the 21st Century.

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Monday, September 17, 2018

His Excellency, President Adama Barrow, on Friday, September 14, 2018, commissioned a fleet of new ambulance vehicles earmarked for 14 rural communities at a ceremony held at the State House grounds in Banjul.

Speaking at the ceremony, President Barrow emphasized that the health and well-being of the population remain on top of his government priorities. He noted that transportation forms a very important part of health care service delivery, particularly in the case of referrals, outreach, monitoring, and other related services. The fleet that would replace nine others that were in use for the past nine years has been handed to an independent transportation management agency, the Riders for Health, for proper maintenance and utility.

“These brand new 14 ambulances are expected to replace the last batch of ambulances procured in 2009. I, therefore, urge the drivers to handle them professionally and with the utmost care. I also challenge the RFH to continue to maintain the ambulances effectively. These ambulances will contribute immensely to the effective referral services to the Gambian community,” calling on them to strengthen the partnership and cooperation,” the president said.

President Barrow indicated that availability, reliability and well-maintained vehicles contribute to health promotion, lauding the long-standing partnership between the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and Riders for Health.

The timeliness of the commissioning of the ambulances couldn’t be any better given that rural dwellers expressed a dire need for such health care facilities during the nationwide tour.

Minister of Health and Social Welfare, Dr Isatou Touray, said the commissioning exercise marks the beginning of a series of activities by government, in partnership with the private sector, NGOs and communities to ensure access to universal health coverage goals.

Stressing the importance of the vehicles, Minister Touray explained that medical teams from health centres use trekking vehicles provided or maintained by RFH to visit outreach clinics to conduct reproductive and child health services.

She added that the number of primary health care villages has significantly risen to 810 from 492 in 2008. Without the availability of reliable and well-maintained vehicles for trekking and supervision of service delivery, such increases in the health care system that is pivotal in the drive to attain universal health coverage may not have been possible.

“Imagine that 60% of all pregnant women and under-5yrs children attending antenatal and infant welfare services are seen at the outreach clinics”, Dr Isatou Touray said.

According to her, the ambulances that would be deployed to hospitals and health centres across the country will facilitate effective evacuation, training and communication in order to save lives of women and children.

The Country Director of Riders for Health, Mrs Therese Drammeh, expressed delight at the commissioning and assures a stronger partnership with the ministry. She explained that their services have become model for other African countries, including Kenya, Mozambique, Lesotho, and Zimbabwe. The model also attracts students of economics from reputable universities across the world in their study into effective public-private-partnership.

Source: State House.

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 17 Sep 2018 14:16:21
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 17 Sep 2018 :  20:30:20  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I had the privilege of meeting some of Riders for Health.at a car park at a Petrol Station some time ago,these motor cyclists were being shown around Gambian villages to give them first hand insight as to need for an ambulance to convey the sick to a health facility a long way from the village,let's face it a donkey cart is useless in these circumstances,these Riders can be in a much better position to fundraise having seen the way of life that exists in Rural Gambia.

Gambian mechanics are taught the correct way of maintaining vehicles by Riders for Health.,
It is an unfortunate fact that there are SOME Gambians who call themselves mechanics, they are excellent at dismantling machinery but OFTEN have difficulty in putting items back together in the right place,which could leave the car owner with a BIG problem driving on the road simply because the "mechanic" has never been taught how to do things in a safe and proper manner by a fully trained mechanic.

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 17 Sep 2018 20:36:03
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2018 :  11:00:12  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"However, what is not clear to this columnist is how are the ambulances will be fueled? Will they be fueled by patients or the health facility they are attached to? "
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September 18, 2018
This Column is meant to monitor and report on issues that concerns the people of the rural communities, in terms of how their development is hindered or facilitated. Rural development is a process that aims to improve the standard of living of people, living in the rural communities.

According to Robert chambers, rural development is a strategy that enables a specific group of people, poor rural women and men, gain for themselves and their children, more of what they want and need.

It involves helping the poorest among those who seek a livelihood in rural communities, to demand and control more of the benefits of rural development. The group includes small scale farmers, tenants and the landless.

Thus, the term rural development may be used, to imply any one of the above-mentioned connotations. To avoid the ineffective floundering among the myriad definitions, we shall define rural development as a process leading to sustainable improvement in the quality of life of rural people, especially the poor.

According to Lamin Sambou Kinteh, for rural development to be meaningful and realizable, the trinity of development must be present such as electricity, water and rural infrastructural development like roads, industries, schools, health facilities etc.

In part ten, we highlighted the women in rural Gambia, decrying the high cost of transport to reach a health facilities by women in labour, and call on the authorities to come to their aid.

According to the women who spoke to this reporter, they encounter lots of financial challenges to reach the nearest health facility in Farafeni, which is eleven kilometers away from Belligo in Illiassa District and twenty three kilometres from Maka Balla Manneh to Essau Lower health facility.

The women asserted that due to the poor condition of the road, transports do not frequently ply the area and as such, one needs to hire the services of a donkey cart, if one suffers from illness not associated to pregnancy; that in case of pregnancy, one has to hire the service of a vehicle which is expensive, because the service of animal drawn cart is risky.

After the publication, President Barrow on Friday, September 14, 2018, commissioned a fleet of new ambulances earmarked for fourteen rural communities, at a ceremony held at State House grounds in Banjul.

Speaking at the ceremony, the President emphasized that the health and well-being of the population remain his Government’s top priority; that transportation is an integral part of health care service delivery, particularly in the case of referrals, outreach, monitoring, and other related services.

“These brand new fourteen ambulances are expected to replace the last batch of ambulances procured in 2009. I therefore urge the drivers to handle them professionally, and with utmost care. I challenge RFH to continue to maintain the ambulances effectively. These ambulances will contribute immensely to the effective referral services for the Gambian community,” Barrow said.

The President indicated that availability, reliability and well-maintained vehicles, contribute to health promotion, lauding the long-standing partnership between the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and RFH.

‘‘This is laudable and I hope that the ambulances will serve their purpose,’’ he concludes.

However, what is not clear to this columnist is how are the ambulances will be fueled? Will they be fueled by patients or the health facility they are attached to?

http://foroyaa.gm/life-of-the-rural-people-gambia-53-makng-rural-gambia-conducive-for-human-habitation-part-eleven-high-cost-of-transport-to-reach-a-health-facility/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 16 Oct 2018 :  22:15:02  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The contents of this article in Foroyaa contain facts and observations that are well known to politicians and aid agencies worldwide,The answers to solve all these problems are very elusive to say the least and no one has found an answer.
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October 16, 2018
This Column is meant to monitor and report on issues that concerns people of the rural communities in terms of how their development is hindered or facilitated. Rural development is a process that aims to improve the standard of living of people in the rural communities.

According to Robert chambers, rural development is a strategy to enable a specific group of people, poor rural women and men, gain for themselves and their children more of what they want and need.

It involves helping the poorest among those who seek a livelihood in rural communities, to demand and control more of the benefits of rural development. The group includes small scale farmers, tenants and the landless.

Thus the term rural development, may be used to imply any one of the above-mentioned connotations.

To avoid the ineffective floundering among the myriad definitions, we shall define rural development as a process that leads to sustainable improvement in the quality of life of rural people, especially the poor.

According to Lamin Sambou Kinteh, for rural development to be meaningful and realizable, the trinity of development must be present such as electricity, water and rural infrastructural development like roads, industries, Schools, and health facilities etc.

Yesterday Monday, October 15th 2018, was World Rural Women Day, and today October 16 is World Food Day.

Many people, government agencies, community groups and non-governmental organisations, are currently gathering in Jarra Soma to celebrate the Day.

However, it is significant to remind readers that poverty in the Gambia is predominately a rural phenomenon.

To address rural poverty, the issue of Agriculture needs to be addressed. The United Nations designated 2014 as the International Year of Family Farming. The theme of that year’s World Food Day celebrated the contribution family farms make towards food security and sustainable development. During the celebration, Madam Victoria Ginja, World Food Programme Country Director at the time, indicated that family farms are the cornerstone to the country’s agricultural production, making a vital contribution to economic prosperity and food security across the world; that in The Gambia, approximately 75% work in farming sector to support themselves and their families; that to put farmers first, “we must ensure access to tools they need to pursue new practices, new technologies, and capture new markets for sustainable growth.”

This she said, will in turn enable farmers to improve their incomes, support their families, and feed The Gambia.

Omar Badjie Action Aid’s Executive Director said Family farming faces many more challenges such as environmental degradation, salt intrusion, soil erosion, deforestation, poor access to other production inputs, and rural/urban migration; that all these contribute towards the decline in productivity and production levels; that family farms are smaller in size, scattered and difficult to mechanize and the management of small ruminants under the free-range systems pose significant management challenges in family farming.

Action Aid Executive Director pointed out the need for investment in technologies and innovations that can help family farming prosper beyond subsistence level is amply manifested. Family farming he said, must be economically profitable, intellectually stimulating, and environmentally sustainable.

“To support family farms, governments, international organizations as well as community based organisation need to focus on improving farm production and productivity through the use of climate resilient sustainable agriculture approaches” he concluded.

Perpetua Katepal Kalala FAO Country Director indicated that in The Gambia over 90 percent of farms are run by families, they provide 60°/o of the food for the family, care and protect our natural resources. Yet she said many family farmers, especially subsistence producers, are part of the 70 percent of the world’s food­ insecure population who live in rural areas.

http://foroyaa.gm/life-of-the-rural-people-gambia-53-makng-rural-gambia-conducive-for-human-habitation-part-fifteen-world-rural-women-day/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.

Edited by - toubab1020 on 16 Oct 2018 22:26:40
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 23 Oct 2018 :  22:14:50  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
October 23, 2018

(WORLD RURAL WOMEN DAY)

This Column is meant to monitor and report on issues that concerns people of the rural communities, in terms of how their development is hindered or facilitated. Rural development is a process that aims to improve the standard of living of people in rural communities.

According to Robert chambers, rural development is a strategy that enables a specific group of people, poor rural women and men, gain for themselves and their children, more of what they want and need.

It involves helping the poorest among those who seek a livelihood in rural communities, to demand and control more of the benefits of rural development. The group includes small scale farmers, tenants and the landless.

Thus the term rural development, may be used to imply any one of the above-mentioned connotations.

To avoid the ineffective floundering among the myriad definitions, we shall define rural development as a process that leads to sustainable improvement in the quality of life of rural people, especially the poor.

According to Lamin Sambou Kinteh, for rural development to be meaningful and realizable, the trinity of development must be present such as electricity, water and rural infrastructural development like roads, industries, Schools, and health facilities etc.

The Sustainable Development Goals are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all.

They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change and environmental degradation, prosperity, peace and justice.

The Goals are interconnect and in order not to leave any behind, it is important that we achieve each Goal and target by 2030.

In this edition, we shall highlight the sixth Sustainable Development Goal which deals with Water and Sanitation.

ENSURE ACCESS TO WATER AND SANITATION FOR ALL

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in and there is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. However, due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, millions of people including children die every year from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world. At the current time, more than 2 billion people are living with the risk of reduced access to freshwater resources and by 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water.

Drought in specific afflicts some of the world’s poorest countries, worsening hunger and malnutrition. Fortunately, there has been great progress made in the past decade regarding drinking sources and sanitation, whereby over 90% of the world’s population now has access to improved sources of drinking water.

To improve sanitation and access to drinking water, there needs to be increased investment in management of freshwater ecosystems and sanitation facilities on a local level in several developing countries within Sub-Saharan Africa, Central Asia, Southern Asia, Eastern Asia and South-Eastern Asia.

What is the current situation in the Gambia with regard to this Sustainable Development Goal? Follow the ‘‘Life of the Rural People’’ Column for answers!!!

http://foroyaa.gm/life-of-the-rural-people-gambia-53-makng-rural-gambia-conducive-for-human-habitation-part-fifteen/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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toubab1020



9541 Posts

Posted - 13 Nov 2018 :  15:36:34  Show Profile Send toubab1020 a Private Message  Reply with Quote

November 13, 2018

This Column is meant to monitor and report on issues that concerns the people of rural communities in terms of how their development is hindered or facilitated.

Rural development is a process that aims to improve the standard of living of people, living in rural communities.

According to Robert Chambers, rural development is a strategy that enables a specific group of people like poor rural women and men, gain for themselves and their children, more of what they want and need. He said it involves helping the poorest among those who seek a livelihood in rural communities to demand and control more of the benefits of rural development; that the group includes small scale farmers, tenants and the landless.

Thus, the term rural development may be used to imply any one of the above-mentioned connotations.

To avoid the ineffective floundering among the myriad definitions, we shall define rural development as a process leading to sustainable improvement in the quality of life of rural people, especially the poor.

According to Lamin Sambou Kinteh, for rural development to be meaningful and realizable, the trinity of development must be present and such as electricity, water and rural infrastructural development like roads, industries, schools, health facilities etc.

The Sustainable Development Goals are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, the climate, environmental degradation, prosperity, peace and justice. The goals interconnect and in order to leave none behind, it is important that we achieve each goal and target by 2030.

The sixth SDG which deals with water and sanitation indicated among other things that “portable water for all, is an essential part of the world we want to live in and there is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this”. However, due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, millions of people including children die every year from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and proper hygiene.

The sixth SDG went on to indicate that water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation, negatively impacts on food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world; that at the current time, more than two billion people live with the risk of reduced access to freshwater resources; that by 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water.

In the last edition, we highlighted the water issue of Njaley Samba. In this edition, we shall highlight the water crisis in Jamali Babou.

Jamali Babou, a village in Niani District Central River Region North of the Gambia has been hit with water crisis for a long time as their only hand-pump well broke down.

According to residents of the village, the situation still persist and they have to travel two kilometers daily to get water from other villages.

According to Njoba Khan, the water crisis in the village is caused by the broken hand-pump of the well which is the only available one in the village as a source of water; that up to the time he was speaking to this reporter, nothing was done to maintain it. She said the hand-pump well was dug in 2001.

“This long trek in search of this essential commodity daily, is increasing on our drudgery and suffering. This has been going on for so long and we are not seeing any end to it,” she concluded.

Rohey Ndow on her part said the water crisis in the village, still persist and is impacting negatively on their health as water is essential to ensure sanitary hygiene.

According to her, apart from their domestic consumption of water from the well, they use the well to water their domestic animals.

Other villagers who spoke to this columnist, shared the same view with the previous speakers and called on Government and Non-governmental Organisations to help them address the problem, which has been going on for long.

http://foroyaa.gm/life-of-the-rural-people-gambia-53-makng-rural-gambia-conducive-for-human-habitation-part-eighteen-focus-on-sdgs/

"Simple is good" & I strongly dislike politics. You cannot defend the indefensible.
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